• We report on the surprisingly high metallicity measured in two absorption systems at high redshift, detected in the Very Large Telescope spectrum of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 090323. The two systems, at redshift z=3.5673 and z=3.5774 (separation Delta v ~ 660 km/s), are dominated by the neutral gas in the interstellar medium of the parent galaxies. From the singly ionized zinc and sulfur, we estimate oversolar metallicities of [Zn/H] =+0.29+/-0.10 and [S/H] = +0.67+/- 0.34, in the blue and red absorber, respectively. These are the highest metallicities ever measured in galaxies at z>3. We propose that the two systems trace two galaxies in the process of merging, whose star formation and metallicity are heightened by the interaction. This enhanced star formation might also have triggered the birth of the GRB progenitor. As typically seen in star-forming galaxies, the fine-structure absorption SiII* is detected, both in G0 and G1. From the rest-frame UV emission in the GRB location, we derive a relatively high, not corrected for dust extinction, star-formation rate SFR ~ 6 Msun/yr. These properties suggest a possible connection between some high-redshift GRB host galaxies and high-z massive sub-millimeter galaxies, which are characterized by disturbed morphologies and high metallicities. Our result provides additional evidence that the dispersion in the chemical enrichment of the Universe at high redshift is substantial, with the existence of very metal rich galaxies less than two billion years after the Big Bang.
  • We present the results of a comprehensive study of the gamma-ray burst 080928 and of its afterglow. GRB 080928 was a long burst detected by Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. It is one of the exceptional cases where optical emission had already been detected when the GRB itself was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. For nearly 100 seconds simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray data provide a coverage of the spectral energy distribution of the transient source from about 1 eV to 150 keV. In particular, we show that the SED during the main prompt emission phase agrees with synchrotron radiation. We constructed the optical/near-infrared light curve and the spectral energy distribution based on Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIa (Australia), and GROND (La Silla) data and compared it to the X-ray light curve retrieved from the Swift/XRT repository. We show that its bumpy shape can be modeled by multiple energy-injections into the forward shock.Furthermore, we investigate whether the temporal and spectral evolution of the tail emission of the first strong flare seen in the early X-ray light curve can be explained by large-angle emission (LAE). We find that a nonstandard LAE model is required to explain the observations. Finally, we report on the results of our search for the GRB host galaxy, for which only a deep upper limit can be provided.
  • We present the observed-frame optical, near- and mid-infrared properties of X-ray selected AGN in the Lockman Hole. Using a likelihood ratio method on optical, near-infrared or mid-infrared catalogues, we assigned counterparts to 401 out of the 409 X-ray sources of the XMM-Newton catalogue. Accurate photometry was collected for all the sources from U to 24um. We used X-ray and optical criteria to remove any normal galaxies, galactic stars, or X-ray clusters among them and studied the multi-wavelength properties of the remaining 377 AGN. We used a mid-IR colour-colour selection to understand the AGN contribution to the optical and infrared emission. Using this selection, we identified different behaviours of AGN-dominated and host-dominated sources in X-ray-optical-infrared colour-colour diagrams. More specifically, the AGN dominated sources show a clear trend in the f_x/f_R vs. R-K and f_24um/f_R vs. R-K diagrams, while the hosts follow the behaviour of non X-ray detected galaxies. In the optical-near-infrared colour-magnitude diagram we see that the known trend of redder objects being more obscured in X-rays is stronger for AGN-dominated than for host-dominated systems. This is an indication that the trend is more related to the AGN contaminating the overall colours than any evolutionary effects. Finally, we find that a significant fraction (~30%) of the reddest AGN are not obscured in X-rays.
  • We present the results of a program to acquire high-quality optical spectra of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S and its central area. New spectroscopic redshifts are measured for 283 counterparts to Chandra sources with deep exposures (t~2-9 hr per pointing) using multi-slit facilities on both the VLT and Keck thus bringing the total number of spectroscopically-identified X-ray sources to over 500 in this survey field. We provide a comprehensive catalog of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S including the optical and near-infrared counterparts, and redshifts (both spectroscopic and photometric) that incorporate published spectroscopic catalogs thus resulting in a final sample with a high fraction (80%) of X-ray sources having secure identifications. We demonstrate the remarkable coverage of the Lx-z plane now accessible from our data while emphasizing the detection of AGNs that contribute to the faint end of the luminosity function at 1.5<z<3. Our redshift catalog includes 17 type 2 QSOs that significantly increases such samples (2x). With our deepest VIMOS observation, we identify "elusive" optically-faint galaxies (R~25) at z~2-3 based upon the detection of interstellar absorption lines; we highlight one such case, an absorption-line galaxy at z=3.208 having no obvious signs of an AGN in its optical spectrum. In addition, we determine distances to eight galaxy groups with extended X-ray emission. Finally, we measure the physical extent of known large-scale structures (z~0.7) evident in the CDF-S. While a thick sheet (radial size of 67.7 Mpc) at z~0.67 extends over the full field, the z~0.73 structure is thin (18.8 Mpc) and filamentary as traced by both AGNs and galaxy groups. In the appendix, we provide spectroscopic redshifts for 49 counterparts to fainter X-ray sources detected only in the 1 and 2 Ms catalogs, and 48 VLA radio sources not detected in X-rays.
  • We used the large binocular camera (LBC) mounted on the large binocular telescope (LBT) to observe the Lockman Hole in the U, B, and V bands. Our observations cover an area of 925 sq.arcmin. We reached depths of 26.7, 26.3, and 26.3 mag(AB) in the three bands, respectively, in terms of 50% source detection efficiency, making this survey the deepest U-band survey and one of the deepest B and V band surveys with respect to its covered area. We extracted a large number of sources (~89000), detected in all three bands and examined their surface density, comparing it with models of galaxy evolution. We find good agreement with previous claims of a steep faint-end slope of the luminosity functions, caused by late-type and irregular galaxies at z>1.5. A population of dwarf star-forming galaxies at 1.5<z<2.5 is needed to explain the U-band number counts. We also find evidence of strong supernova feedback at high redshift. This survey is complementary to the r, i, and z Lockman Hole survey conducted with the Subaru telescope and provides the essential wavelength coverage to derive photometric redshifts and select different types of sources from the Lockman Hole for further study.
  • X-ray flashes (XRFs) are a class of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, Ep, below 30 keV, whereas classical GRBs have Ep of a few hundreds keV. Apart from Ep and the lower luminosity, the properties of XRFs are typical of the classical GRBs. Yet, the nature of XRFs and the differences from that of GRBs are not understood. In addition, there is no consensus on the interpretation of the shallow decay phase observed in most X-ray afterglows of both XRFs and GRBs. We examine in detail the case of XRF 080330 discovered by Swift at the redshift of 1.51. This burst is representative of the XRF class and exhibits an X-ray shallow decay. The rich and broadband (from NIR to UV) photometric data set we collected across this phase makes it an ideal candidate to test the off-axis jet interpretation proposed to explain both the softness of XRFs and the shallow decay phase. We present prompt gamma-ray, early and late IR/visible/UV and X-ray observations of the XRF 080330. We derive a SED from NIR to X-ray bands across the plateau phase with a power-law index of 0.79 +- 0.01 and negligible rest-frame dust extinction. The multi-wavelength evolution of the afterglow is achromatic from ~10^2 s out to ~8x10^4 s. We describe the temporal evolution of the multi-wavelength afterglow within the context of the standard afterglow model and show that a single-component jet viewed off-axis explains the observations (abriged).
  • The detection of GeV photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has important consequences for the interpretation and modelling of these most-energetic cosmological explosions. The full exploitation of the high-energy measurements relies, however, on the accurate knowledge of the distance to the events. Here we report on the discovery of the afterglow and subsequent redshift determination of GRB 080916C, the first GRB detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with high significance detection of photons at >0.1 GeV. Observations were done with 7-channel imager GROND at the 2.2m MPI/ESO telescope, the SIRIUS instrument at the Nagoya-SAAO 1.4m telescope in South Africa, and the GMOS instrument at Gemini-S. The afterglow photometric redshift of z=4.35+-0.15, based on simultaneous 7-filter observations with the Gamma-Ray Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND), places GRB 080916C among the top 5% most distant GRBs, and makes it the most energetic GRB known to date. The detection of GeV photons from such a distant event is rather surprising. The observed gamma-ray variability in the prompt emission together with the redshift suggests a lower limit for the Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic ejecta of Gamma > 1090. This value rivals any previous measurements of Gamma in GRBs and strengthens the extreme nature of GRB 080916C.
  • We report the discovery of the most-distant double-peaked emitter, CXOECDFS J033115.0-275518, at z=1.369. A Keck/DEIMOS spectrum shows a clearly double-peaked broad Mg II $\lambda2799$ emission line, with FWHM 11000 km/s for the line complex. The line profile can be well fit by an elliptical relativistic Keplerian disk model. This is one of a handful of double-peaked emitters known to be a luminous quasar, with excellent multiwavelength coverage and a high-quality X-ray spectrum. CXOECDFS J033115.0-275518 is a radio-loud quasar with two radio lobes (FR II morphology) and a radio loudness of f_{5 GHz}/f_{4400 \AA}~429. The X-ray spectrum can be modeled by a power law with photon index 1.72 and no intrinsic absorption; the rest-frame 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity is $5.0\times10^{44}$ erg/s. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of CXOECDFS J033115.0-275518 has a shape typical for radio-loud quasars and double-peaked emitters at lower redshift. The local viscous energy released from the line-emitting region of the accretion disk is probably insufficient to power the observed line flux, and external illumination of the disk appears to be required. The presence of a big blue bump in the SED along with the unexceptional X-ray spectrum suggest that the illumination cannot arise from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.
  • We report on GROND observations of a 40 sec duration (rest-frame) optical flare from GRB 080129 at redshift 4.349. The rise- and decay time follow a power law with indices +12 and -8, respectively, inconsistent with a reverse shock and a factor 10$^5$ faster than variability caused by ISM interaction. While optical flares have been seen in the past (e.g. GRB 990123, 041219B, 060111B and 080319B), for the first time, our observations not only resolve the optical flare into sub-components, but also provide a spectral energy distribution from the optical to the near-infrared once every minute. The delay of the flare relative to the GRB, its spectral energy distribution as well as the ratio of pulse widths suggest it to arise from residual collisions in GRB outflows \cite{liw08}.If this interpretation is correct and can be supported by more detailed modelling or observation in further GRBs, the delay measurement provides an independent, determination of the Lorentz factor of the outflow.
  • We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to lambda = 9400 A, and zero flux for 7500 A < lambda<9400 A, which we interpret as the onset of a Gunn-Peterson trough at z=6.695+-0.025 (95.5% conf. level), making GRB 080913 the highest redshift GRB to date, and more distant than the highest-redshift QSO. We note that many redshift indicators which are based on promptly available burst or afterglow properties have failed for GRB 080913. We report on our follow-up campaign and compare the properties of GRB 080913 with bursts at lower redshift. In particular, since the afterglow of this burst is fainter than typical for GRBs, we show that 2m-class telescopes can identify most high-redshift GRBs.
  • Aims: The AGILE gamma-ray burst GRB 080514B is the first burst with detected emission above 30 MeV and an optical afterglow. However, no spectroscopic redshift for this burst is known. Methods: We compiled ground-based photometric optical/NIR and millimeter data from several observatories, including the multi-channel imager GROND, as well as ultraviolet \swift UVOT and X-ray XRT observations. The spectral energy distribution of the optical/NIR afterglow shows a sharp drop in the \swift UVOT UV filters that can be utilized for the estimation of a redshift. Results: Fitting the SED from the \swift UVOT $uvw2$ band to the $H$ band, we estimate a photometric redshift of $z=1.8^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$, consistent with the pseudo redshift reported by Pelangeon & Atteia (2008) based on the gamma-ray data. Conclusions: The afterglow properties of GRB 080514B do not differ from those exhibited by the global sample of long bursts, supporting the view that afterglow properties are basically independent of prompt emission properties.
  • We present an analysis of 109 moderate-luminosity (41.9 < Log L{0.5-8.0 keV} < 43.7) AGN in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South survey, which is drawn from 5,549 galaxies from the COMBO-17 and GEMS surveys having 0.4 < z < 1.1. These obscured or optically-weak AGN facilitate the study of their host galaxies since the AGN provide an insubstantial amount of contamination to the galaxy light. We find that the color distribution of AGN host galaxies is highly dependent upon (1) the strong color-evolution of luminous (M_V < -20.7) galaxies, and (2) the influence of ~10 Mpc scale structures. When excluding galaxies within the redshift range 0.63 < z < 0.76, a regime dominated by sources in large-scale structures at z=0.67 and z=0.73, we observe a bimodality in the host galaxy colors. Galaxies hosting AGN at z > 0.8 preferentially have bluer (rest-frame U-V < 0.7) colors than their z <~ 0.6 counterparts (many of which fall along the red sequence). The fraction of galaxies hosting AGN peaks in the ``green valley'' (0.5 < U-V < 1.0); this is primarily due to enhanced AGN activity in the redshift interval 0.63 < z < 0.76. The AGN fraction in this redshift and color interval is 12.8% (compared to its `field' value of 7.8%) and reaches a maximum of 14.8% at U-V~0.8. We further find that blue, bulge-dominated (Sersic index n>2.5) galaxies have the highest fraction of AGN (21%) in our sample. We explore the scenario that the evolution of AGN hosts is driven by galaxy mergers and illustrate that an accurate assessment requires a larger area survey since only three hosts may be undergoing a merger with timescales <1 Gyr following a starburst phase.
  • We describe the construction of GROND, a 7-channel imager, primarily designed for rapid observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. It allows simultaneous imaging in the Sloan g'r'i'z' and near-infrared $JHK$ bands. GROND was commissioned at the MPI/ESO 2.2m telescope at La Silla (Chile) in April 2007, and first results of its performance and calibration are presented.
  • The Lockman Hole field represents the sky area of lowest Galactic line-of-sight column density N_H=5.7X10^19 cm^-2. It was observed by the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory in 18 pointings for a total of 1.16 Msec (raw EPIC pn observing time) constituting the deepest XMM-Newton exposure so far. We present a catalogue of the X-ray sources detected in the central 0.196 deg^2 of the field and discuss the derived number counts and X-ray colours. In the 0.5--2.0 keV band, a sensitivity limit (defined as the faintest detectable source)of 1.9X10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1 was reached. The 2.0--10.0 keV band and 5.0--10.0 keV band sensitivity limits were 9X10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1 and 1.8X10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1, respectively.A total of 409 sources above a detection likelihood of 10 (3.9 sigma) were found within a radius of 15' off the field centre, of which 340, 266, and 98 sources were detected in the soft, hard, and very hard bands, respectively. The number counts in each energy band are in close agreement with results from previous surveys and with the synthesis models of the X-ray background. A 6% of Compton-thick source candidates have been selected from the X-ray colour-colour diagram. This fraction is consistent with the most recent predictions of X-ray background population synthesis models at our flux limits. We also estimated, for the first time, the logN-logS relation for Compton-thick AGN.
  • We present the XMM-Newton Medium sensitivity Survey (XMS), including a total of 318 X-ray sources found among the serendipitous content of 25 XMM-Newton target fields. The XMS comprises four largely overlapping source samples selected at soft (0.5-2 keV), intermediate (0.5-4.5 keV), hard (2-10 keV) and ultra-hard (4.5-7.5 keV) bands, the first three of them being flux-limited. We report on the optical identification of the XMS samples, complete to 85-95%. At the intermediate flux levels sampled by the XMS we find that the X-ray sky is largely dominated by Active Galactic Nuclei. The fraction of stars in soft X-ray selected samples is below 10%, and only a few per cent for hard selected samples. We find that the fraction of optically obscured objects in the AGN population stays constant at around 15-20% for soft and intermediate band selected X-ray sources, over 2 decades of flux. The fraction of obscured objects amongst the AGN population is larger (~35-45%) in the hard or ultra-hard selected samples, and constant across a similarly wide flux range. The distribution in X-ray-to-optical flux ratio is a strong function of the selection band, with a larger fraction of sources with high values in hard selected samples. Sources with X-ray-to-optical flux ratios in excess of 10 are dominated by obscured AGN, but with a significant contribution from unobscured AGN.
  • Measuring the population of obscured quasars is one of the key issues to understand the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). With a redshift completeness of 99%, the X-ray sources detected in Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) provide the best sample for this issue. In this letter we study the population of obscured quasars in CDF-S by choosing the 4 -- 7 keV selected sample, which is less biased by the intrinsic X-ray absorption. The 4 -- 7 keV band selected samples also filter out most of the X-ray faint sources with too few counts, for which the measurements of N_H and L_X have very large uncertainties. Simply adopting the best-fit L_2-10keV and N_H, we find 71% (20 out of 28) of the quasars (with intrinsic L_2-10keV > 10^44 erg/s) are obscured with N_H > 10^22 cm^-2. Taking account of the uncertainties in the measurements of both N_H and L_X, conservative lower and upper limits of the fraction are 54% (13 out 24) and 84% (31 out 37). In Chandra Deep Field North, the number is 29%, however, this is mainly due to the redshift incompleteness. We estimate a fraction of ~ 50% - 63% after correcting the redshift incompleteness with a straightforward approach. Our results robustly confirm the existence of a large population of obscured quasars.
  • We present a detailed X-ray spectral analysis of the sources in the 1Ms catalog of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) taking advantage of optical spectroscopy and photometric redshifts for 321 sources. As a default spectral model, we adopt a power law with slope Gamma with an intrinsic redshifted absorption N_H, a fixed Galactic absorption and an unresolved Fe emission line. For 82 X-ray bright sources, we perform the X-ray spectral analysis leaving both Gamma and N_H free. The weighted mean value is <Gamma>~ 1.75+-0.02, with an intrinsic dispersion of sigma~0.30. We do not find hints of a correlation between Gamma and the N_H. We detect the presence of a scattered component at soft energies in 8 sources, and a pure reflection spectrum, typical of Compton-thick AGN, in 14 sources (Compton-thick AGN candidates). The intrinsic N_H distribution shows a lognormal shape, peaking around log(N_H)~23.1 and with sigma~1.1. We find that the fraction of absorbed sources (with N_H>10^{22} cm^{-2}) in the sample is constant (at the level of about 75%) or moderately increasing with redshift. Finally, we compare the optical classification to the X-ray spectral properties, confirming that the correspondence of unabsorbed (absorbed) X-ray sources to optical Type I (Type II) AGN is accurate for at least 80% of the sources with spectral identification (1/3 of the total X-ray sample).
  • In this letter we report the detection of a strong and extremely blueshifted X-ray absorption feature in the 1 Ms Chandra spectrum of CXO CDFS J033260.0-274748, a quasar at z = 2.579 with L_2-10keV ~ 4x10^44 ergs/s. The broad absorption feature at ~ 6.3 keV in the observed frame can be fitted either as an absorption edge at 20.9 keV or as a broad absorption line at 22.2 keV rest frame. The absorber has to be extremely ionized with an ionization parameter \xi ~ 10^4, and a high column density N_H >5x10^23 cm^-2. We reject the possibility of a statistical or instrumental artifact. The most likely interpretation is an extremely blueshifted broad absorption line or absorption edge, due to H or He--like iron in a relativistic jet-like outflow with bulk velocity of ~ 0.7-0.8 c. Similar relativistic outflows have been reported in the X-ray spectra of several other AGNs in the past few years.
  • We present Chandra point-source catalogs for the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S) survey. The E-CDF-S consists of four contiguous 250 ks Chandra observations covering an approximately square region of total solid angle ~0.3 deg^2, which flank the existing ~1 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S). The survey reaches sensitivity limits of 1.1 X 10^-16 erg/cm^2/s and 6.7 X 10^-16 erg/cm^2/s for the 0.5-2.0 keV and 2-8 keV bands, respectively. We detect 762 distinct X-ray point sources within the E-CDF-S exposure; 589 of these sources are new (i.e., not previously detected in the ~1 Ms CDF-S). This brings the total number of X-ray point sources detected in the E-CDF-S region to 915 (via the E-CDF-S and ~1 Ms CDF-S observations). Source positions are determined using matched-filter and centroiding techniques; the median positional uncertainty is ~0.35". The basic X-ray and optical properties of these sources indicate a variety of source types, although absorbed active galactic nuclei (AGNs) seem to dominate. In addition to our main Chandra catalog, we constructed a supplementary source catalog containing 33 lower significance X-ray point sources that have bright optical counterparts (R<23). These sources generally have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios expected for normal and starburst galaxies, which lack a strong AGN component. We present basic number-count results for our main Chandra catalog and find good agreement with the ~1 Ms CDF-S for sources with 0.5-2.0 keV and 2-8 keV fluxes greater than 3 X 10^-16 erg/cm^2/s and 1 X 10^-15 erg/cm^2/s, respectively. Furthermore, three extended sources are detected in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, which are found to be likely associated with galaxy groups or poor clusters at z ~ 0.1-0.7; these have typical rest-frame 0.5-2.0 keV luminosities of (1-5) X 10^42 erg/s.
  • We provide important new constraints on the nature and redshift distribution of optically faint (R>25) X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field South Survey. We show that we can derive accurate photometric redshifts for the spectroscopically unidentified sources thus maximizing the redshift completeness for the whole X-ray sample. Our new redshift distribution for the X-ray source population is in better agreement with that predicted by X-ray background synthesis models; however, we still find an overdensity of low redshift (z<1) sources. The optically faint sources are mainly X-ray absorbed AGN, as determined from direct X-ray spectral analysis and other diagnostics. Many of these optically faint sources have high (>10) X-ray-to-optical flux ratios. We also find that ~71% of them are well fitted with the SED of an early-type galaxy with <z_phot>~1.9 and the remaining 29% with irregular or starburst galaxies mainly at z_phot>3. We estimate that 23% of the optically faint sources are X-ray absorbed QSOs. The overall population of X-ray absorbed QSOs contributes a ~15% fraction of the [2-10] keV X-ray Background (XRB) whereas current XRB synthesis models predict a ~38% contribution.
  • We present a study of the galaxy population in the cluster RX J1053.7+5735, one of the most distant X-ray selected clusters of galaxies, which also shows an unusual double-lobed X-ray morphology, indicative of a possible equal-mass cluster merger. Using Keck-DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the 2x1.5 arcmin region surrounding RX J1053.7+5735, we secured redshifts for six galaxies in the range 1.129 < z < 1.139, with a mean redshift <z>=1.134. The mean redshift agrees well with the cluster X-ray redshift previously estimated from the cluster X-ray Fe-K line, confirming the presence of a cluster at z~1.135. Galaxies with concordant redshifts are located in both eastern and western sub-clusters of the double cluster structure, indicating that both sub-clusters are at similar redshifts. This result is also consistent with a previous claim that both eastern and western X-ray lobes have similar X-ray redshifts. Based on their separation of ~ 250 kpc/h, these results support the interpretation that RX J1053.7+5735 is an equal-mass cluster merger taken place at z ~ 1, although further direct evidence for dynamical state of the cluster is needed for a more definitive statement about the cluster merging state. The six galaxies have a line-of-sight velocity dispersion = 650 km/s. All six galaxies show clear absorption features of CaII H & K, and several Balmer lines, typical of early galaxies at the present epoch, in agreement with their I-K colors. A color-magnitude diagram, constructed from deep optical/NIR observations of the RX J1053.7+5735 field, shows a clear red color sequence. There is an indication that the red sequence in RX J1053.7+5735 lies ~ 0.3 to the blue of the Coma line, qualitatively consistent with previous studies investigating other clusters at z ~ 1.
  • Based on the photometry of 10 near-UV, optical, and near-infrared bands of the Chandra Deep Field South, we estimate the photometric redshifts for 342 X-ray sources, which constitute ~99% of all the detected X-ray sources in the field. The models of spectral energy distribution are based on galaxies and a combination of power-law continuum and emission lines. Color information is useful for source classifications: Type-I AGN show non-thermal spectral features that are distinctive from galaxies and Type-II AGN. The hardness ratio in X-ray and the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio are also useful discriminators. Using rudimentary color separation techniques, we are able to further refine our photometric redshift estimations. Among these sources, 137 have reliable spectroscopic redshifts, which we use to verify the accuracy of photometric redshifts and to modify the model inputs. The average relative dispersion in redshift distribution is ~8%, among the most accurate for photometric surveys. The high reliability of our results is attributable to the high quality and broad coverage of data as well as the applications of several independent methods and a careful evaluation of every source. We apply our redshift estimations to study the effect of redshift on broadband colors and to study the redshift distribution of AGN. Our results show that both the hardness ratio and U-K color decline with redshift, which may be the result of a K-correction. The number of Type-II AGN declines significantly at z>2 and that of galaxies declines at z>1. However, the distribution of Type-I AGN exhibits less redshift dependence. As well, we observe a significant peak in the redshift distribution at z=0.6. We demonstrate that our photometric redshift estimation produces a reliable database for the study of X-ray luminosity of galaxies and AGN.
  • We present the COMBO-17 object catalogue of the Chandra Deep Field South for public use, covering a field which is 31.5' x 30' in size. This catalogue lists astrometry, photometry in 17 passbands from 350 to 930 nm, and ground-based morphological data for 63,501 objects. The catalogue also contains multi-colour classification into the categories 'Star', 'Galaxy' and 'Quasar' as well as photometric redshifts. We include restframe luminosities in Johnson, SDSS and Bessell passbands and estimated errors. The redshifts are most reliable at R<24, where the sample contains approximately 100 quasars, 1000 stars and 10000 galaxies. We use nearly 1000 spectroscopically identified objects in conjunction with detailed simulations to characterize the performance of COMBO-17. We show that the selection of quasars, more generally type-1 AGN, is nearly complete and minimally contaminated at z=[0.5,5] for luminosities above M_B=-21.7. Their photometric redshifts are accurate to roughly 5000 km/sec. Galaxy redshifts are accurate to 1% in dz/(1+z) at R<21. They degrade in quality for progressively fainter galaxies, reaching accuracies of 2% for galaxies with R~222 and of 10% for galaxies with R>24. The selection of stars is complete to R~23, and deeper for M stars. We also present an updated discussion of our classification technique with maps of survey completeness, and discuss possible failures of the statistical classification in the faint regime at R>24.
  • We describe the initial results of a programme to detect and identify extended X-ray sources found serendipitously in XMM-Newton observations. We have analysed 186 EPIC-PN images at high galactic latitude with a limiting flux of $1\times 10^{-14}$ \ergcms and found 62 cluster candidates. Thanks to the enhanced sensitivity of the XMM-Newton telescopes, the new clusters found in this pilot study are on the average fainter, more compact, and more distant than those found in previous X-ray surveys. At our survey limit the surface density of clusters is about 5 deg$^{-2}$. We also present the first results of an optical follow-up programme aiming at the redshift measurement of a large sample of clusters. The results of this pilot study give a first glimpse on the potential of serendipitous cluster science with XMM-Newton based on real data. The largest, yet to be fulfilled promise is the identification of a large number of high-redshift clusters for cosmological studies up to $z=1$ or 1.5.
  • In this letter we report the detection of an extremely strong X-ray emission line in the 940ks chandra ACIS-I spectrum of CXO CDFS J033225.3-274219. The source was identified as a Type1 AGN at redshift of z = 1.617, with 2.0 -- 10.0 keV rest frame X-ray luminosity of ~ 10^44 ergs s^-1. The emission line was detected at 6.2^{+0.2}_{-0.1} keV, with an equivalent width (EW) of 4.4^{+3.2}_{-1.4} keV, both quantities referring to the observed frame. In the rest frame, the line is at 16.2^{+0.4}_{-0.3} keV with an EW of 11.5^{+8.3}_{-3.7} keV. An X-ray emission line at similar energy (~ 17 keV, rest frame) in QSO PKS 2149-306 was discovered before using ASCA data. We reject the possibility that the line is due to a statistical or instrumental artifact. The line is most likely due to blueshifted Fe-K emission from an relativistic outflow, probably an inner X-ray jet, with velocities of the order of ~ 0.6-0.7c. Other possible explanations are also discussed.