• We present results from high-resolution, optical to near-IR imaging of host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), identified in the original Kepler field. Part of the data were obtained under the Kepler imaging follow-up observation program over seven years (2009 - 2015). Almost 90% of stars that are hosts to planet candidates or confirmed planets were observed. We combine measurements of companions to KOI host stars from different bands to create a comprehensive catalog of projected separations, position angles, and magnitude differences for all detected companion stars (some of which may not be bound). Our compilation includes 2297 companions around 1903 primary stars. From high-resolution imaging, we find that ~10% (~30%) of the observed stars have at least one companion detected within 1" (4"). The true fraction of systems with close (< ~4") companions is larger than the observed one due to the limited sensitivities of the imaging data. We derive correction factors for planet radii caused by the dilution of the transit depth: assuming that planets orbit the primary stars or the brightest companion stars, the average correction factors are 1.06 and 3.09, respectively. The true effect of transit dilution lies in between these two cases and varies with each system. Applying these factors to planet radii decreases the number of KOI planets with radii smaller than 2 R_Earth by ~2-23% and thus affects planet occurrence rates. This effect will also be important for the yield of small planets from future transit missions such as TESS.
  • We present Spitzer 4.5\micron\ light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO~8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by \citet{vaneyken12} and \citet{barnes13} predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of $300 - 600$ days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events ($>3$ years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the $M_\star = 0.34\ M_\odot$ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO~8-8695b.
  • We have determined the angular diameters of two metal-poor stars, HD 122563 and Gmb 1830, using CHARA and Palomar Testbed Interferometer observations. For the giant star HD 122563, we derive an angular diameter theta_3D = 0.940 +- 0.011 milliarcseconds (mas) using limb-darkening from 3D convection simulations and for the dwarf star Gmb 1830 (HD 103095) we obtain a 1D limb-darkened angular diameter theta_1D = 0.679 +- 0.007 mas. Coupling the angular diameters with photometry yields effective temperatures with precisions better than 55 K (Teff = 4598 +- 41 K and 4818 +- 54 K --- for the giant and the dwarf star, respectively). Including their distances results in very well-determined luminosities and radii (L = 230 +- 6 L_sun, R = 23.9 +- 1.9 R_sun and L = 0.213 +- 0.002 L_sun, R = 0.664 +- 0.015 R_sun, respectively). We used the CESAM2k stellar structure and evolution code in order to produce models that fit the observational data. We found values of the mixing-length parameter alpha (which describes 1D convection) that depend on the mass of the star. The masses were determined from the models with precisions of <3% and with the well-measured radii excellent constraints on the surface gravity are obtained (log g = 1.60 +- 0.04, 4.59 +- 0.02, respectively). The very small errors on both log g and Teff provide stringent constraints for spectroscopic analyses given the sensitivity of abundances to both of these values. The precise determination of Teff for the two stars brings into question the photometric scales for metal-poor stars.
  • The bright star 55 Cancri is known to host five planets, including a transiting super-Earth. We use the CHARA Array to directly determine the following of 55 Cnc's stellar astrophysical parameters: $R=0.943 \pm 0.010 R_{\odot}$, $T_{\rm EFF} = 5196 \pm 24$ K. Planet 55 Cnc f ($M \sin i = 0.155 M_{Jupiter}$) spends the majority of the duration of its elliptical orbit in the circumstellar habitable zone (0.67--1.32 AU) where, with moderate greenhouse heating, it could harbor liquid water. Our determination of 55 Cancri's stellar radius allows for a model-independent calculation of the physical diameter of the transiting super-Earth 55 Cnc e ($\simeq 2.1 R_{\earth}$), which, depending on the assumed literature value of planetary mass, implies a bulk density of 0.76 $\rho_{\earth}$ or 1.07 $\rho_{\earth}$.
  • We present angular diameters for 42 luminosity class I stars and 32 luminosity class II stars that have been interferometrically determined with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer. Derived values of radius and effective temperature are established for these objects, and an empirical calibration of these parameters for supergiants will be presented as a functions of spectral type and colors. For the effective temperature versus $(V-K)_0$ color, we find an empirical calibration with a median deviation of $\Delta T = 70$K in the range of $0.7 < (V-K)_0 < 5.1$ for LC I stars; for LC II, the median deviation is $\Delta T = 120$K from $0.4 < (V-K)_0 < 4.3$. Effective temperature as a function of spectral type is also calibrated from these data, but shows significantly more scatter than the $T_{\rm EFF}$ versus $(V-K)_0$ relationship. No deviation of $T_{\rm EFF}$ versus spectral type is seen for these high luminosity objects relative to luminosity class II giants. Directly determined diameters range up to $400 R_\odot$, though are limited by poor distance determinations, which dominate the error estimates. These temperature and radii measures reflect a direct calibration of these parameters for supergiants from empirical means.
  • The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) archive of observations between 1998 and 2005 is examined for objects appropriate for calibration of optical long-baseline interferometer observations - stars that are predictably point-like and single. Approximately 1,400 nights of data on 1,800 objects were examined for this investigation. We compare those observations to an intensively studied object that is a suitable calibrator, HD217014, and statistically compare each candidate calibrator to that object by computing both a Mahalanobis distance and a Principal Component Analysis. Our hypothesis is that the frequency distribution of visibility data associated with calibrator stars differs from non-calibrator stars such as binary stars. Spectroscopic binaries resolved by PTI, objects known to be unsuitable for calibrator use, are similarly tested to establish detection limits of this approach. From this investigation, we find more than 350 observed stars suitable for use as calibrators (with an additional $\approx 140$ being rejected), corresponding to $\gtrsim 95%$ sky coverage for PTI. This approach is noteworthy in that it rigorously establishes calibration sources through a traceable, empirical methodology, leveraging the predictions of spectral energy distribution modeling but also verifying it with the rich body of PTI's on-sky observations.
  • We have measured the angular diameter of the transiting extrasolar planet host star HD 189733 using the CHARA O/IR interferometric array. Combining our new angular diameter of 0.377+/-0.024 mas with the Hipparcos parallax leads to a linear radius for the host star of 0.779+/-0.052 Rsol and a radius for the planet of 1.19+/-0.08 RJup. Adopting the mass of the planet as derived by its discoverers, we derive a mean density of the planet of 0.91+/-0.18 g cm-3. This is the first determination of the diameter of an extrasolar planet through purely direct means.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope photometry of six short-period polars, EF Eri, V347 Pav, VV Pup, V834 Cen, GG Leo, and MR Ser. We have combined the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (3.6 -8.0 microns) data with the 2MASS J, H, K_s photometry to construct the spectral energy distributions of these systems from the near- to mid-IR (1.235 - 8 microns). We find that five out of the six polars have flux densities in the mid-IR that are substantially in excess of the values expected from the stellar components alone. We have modeled the observed SEDs with a combination of contributions from the white dwarf, secondary star, and either cyclotron emission or a cool, circumbinary dust disk to fill in the long-wavelength excess. We find that a circumbinary dust disk is the most likely cause of the 8 micron excess in all cases, but we have been unable to rule out the specific (but unlikely) case of completely optically thin cyclotron emission as the source of the observed 8 micron flux density. While both model components can generate enough flux at 8 microns, neither dust nor cyclotron emission alone can match the excess above the stellar components at all wavelengths. A model combining both cyclotron and dust contributions, possibly with some accretion-generated flux in the near-IR, is probably required, but our observed SEDs are not sufficiently well-sampled to constrain such a complicated model. If the 8 micron flux density is caused by the presence of a circumbinary dust disk, then our estimates of the masses of these disks are many orders of magnitude below the mass required to affect CV evolution.
  • We present observations of the A7IV-V star Alderamin ($\alpha$ Cep, HR 8162, HD 203280) from the Georgia State University CHARA Array. These infrared interferometric angular size measurements indicate a non-circular projected disk brightness distribution for this known rapid rotator. The interferometric observations are modeled as arising from an elongated rigid atmosphere, with apparent polar and equatorial radii of $r_p=0.6753^{+0.0119}_{-0.0135}$ milliarcseconds (mas) and $r_e=0.8767^{+0.0293}_{-0.0183}$ mas, respectively, for a difference of $201\pm 32$ microarcseconds ($\mu$as), and with an axial ratio of $r_e/r_p =1.298\pm 0.051$. Using the Hipparcos distance of $14.96\pm 0.11$ pc, these angular measures translate to $2.18\pm0.05$ and $2.82\pm0.10$ $R_\odot$. The inclination of Alderamin to the line of sight indicated by this modeling is effectively edge-on ($i=88.2^{+1.8}_{-13.3}$). The star has a true rotational velocity of $283\pm 10$ km/s ($\sim83$% of breakup velocity), and a polar temperature of roughly 8400 K. Significantly, a necessary aspect of this modeling is a determination of the gravity darkening coefficient, which at a value of $\beta=0.084^{+0.026}_{-0.049}$ is consistent with a convective photosphere, as expected for an A7IV-V star. Our detailed characterization of this object allows us to investigate various scenarios for the angular momentum history of Alderamin and the appropriateness of certain stellar evolution models.
  • We present angular size measurements of 22 oxygen-rich Mira variable stars. These data are part of a long term observational program using the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) to characterize the observable behavior of these stars. Complementing the infrared angular size measurements, values for variable star phase, spectral type, bolometric flux and distance were established for stars in the sample; flux and distance led to values for effective temperature, and linear radius, respectively. Additionally, values for the K-[12] color excess were established for these stars, which is indicative of dusty mass loss. Stars with higher color excess are shown to be systematically 120 solar radii larger than their low color excess counterparts, regardless of period. This analysis appears to present a solution to a long-standing question presented by the evidence that some Mira angular diameters are indicative of first overtone pulsation, while other diameters are more consistent with fundamental pulsation. A simple examination of the resultant sizes of these stars in the context of pulsation mode is consistent with at least some of these objects pulsating in the fundamental mode.