• We conduct a small-scale pathfinding survey designed to identify the average polarization properties of the diffuse ISM locally at the lowest dust content regions. We perform deep optopolarimetric surveys within three $\sim 15' \times 15'$ regions located at $b > 48^\circ$, using the RoboPol instrument. The observed samples of stars are photometrically complete to $\sim$16 mag in the R-band. The selected regions exhibit low dust emission at 353 GHz and low total reddening compared to the majority of high-latitude sightlines. We measure the level of systematic uncertainty for all observing epochs and find it to be 0.1\% in fractional linear polarization, $p$. The majority of individual stellar measurements are non-detections. However, our survey strategy enables us to locate the mean fractional linear polarization $p_{mean}$ in each of the three regions. The region with lowest dust content yields $p_{mean}=(0.054 \pm 0.038) \%$, not significantly different from zero. We find significant detections for the remaining two regions of: $p_{mean}=(0.113 \pm 0.036) \%$ and $p_{mean}=(0.208 \pm 0.044) \%$. Using a Bayesian approach we provide upper limits on the intrinsic spread of the small-scale distributions of $q$ and $u$. At the detected $p_{mean}$ levels, the determination of the systematic uncertainty is critical for the reliability of the measurements. We verify the significance of our detections with statistical tests, accounting for all sources of uncertainty. Using publicly available HI emission data, we identify the velocity components that most likely account for the observed $p_{mean}$ and find their morphologies to be misaligned with the orientation of the mean plane-of-sky magnetic field at a spatial resolution of 10$\arcmin$. We find indications that the standard upper envelope of $p$ with reddening underestimates the maximum $p$ at very low E(B-V) ($\leq 0.01$ mag).
  • Filaments in Herschel molecular cloud images are found to exhibit a "characteristic width". This finding is in tension with spatial power spectra of the data, which show no indication of this characteristic scale. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is a result of the methodology adopted for measuring filament widths. First, we perform the previously used analysis technique on artificial scale-free data, and obtain a peaked width distribution of filament-like structures. Next, we repeat the analysis on three Herschel maps and reproduce the narrow distribution of widths found in previous studies $-$ when considering the average width of each filament. However, the distribution of widths measured at all points along a filament spine is broader than the distribution of mean filament widths, indicating that the narrow spread (interpreted as a "characteristic" width) results from averaging. Furthermore, the width is found to vary significantly from one end of a filament to the other. Therefore, the previously identified peak at 0.1 pc cannot be understood as representing the typical width of filaments. We find an alternative explanation by modelling the observed width distribution as a truncated power-law distribution, sampled with uncertainties. The position of the peak is connected to the lower truncation scale and is likely set by the choice of parameters used in measuring filament widths. We conclude that a "characteristic" width of filaments is not supported by the available data.
  • We present average R-band optopolarimetric data, as well as variability parameters, from the first and second RoboPol observing season. We investigate whether gamma- ray--loud and gamma-ray--quiet blazars exhibit systematic differences in their optical polarization properties. We find that gamma-ray--loud blazars have a systematically higher polarization fraction (0.092) than gamma-ray--quiet blazars (0.031), with the hypothesis of the two samples being drawn from the same distribution of polarization fractions being rejected at the 3{\sigma} level. We have not found any evidence that this discrepancy is related to differences in the redshift distribution, rest-frame R-band lu- minosity density, or the source classification. The median polarization fraction versus synchrotron-peak-frequency plot shows an envelope implying that high synchrotron- peaked sources have a smaller range of median polarization fractions concentrated around lower values. Our gamma-ray--quiet sources show similar median polarization fractions although they are all low synchrotron-peaked. We also find that the random- ness of the polarization angle depends on the synchrotron peak frequency. For high synchrotron-peaked sources it tends to concentrate around preferred directions while for low synchrotron-peaked sources it is more variable and less likely to have a pre- ferred direction. We propose a scenario which mediates efficient particle acceleration in shocks and increases the helical B-field component immediately downstream of the shock.
  • We investigate the optical polarization properties of high-energy BL Lac objects using data from the RoboPol blazar monitoring program and the Nordic Optical Telescope. We wish to understand if there are differences in the BL Lac objects that are detected with the current-generation TeV instruments compared to those that have not yet been detected. The mean polarization fraction of the TeV-detected BL Lacs is 5% while the non-TeV sources show a higher mean polarization fraction of 7%. This difference in polarization fraction disappears when the dilution by the unpolarized light of the host galaxy is accounted for. The TeV sources show somewhat lower fractional polarization variability amplitudes than the non-TeV sources. Also the fraction of sources with a smaller spread in the Q/I - U/I -plane and a clumped distribution of points away from the origin, possibly indicating a preferred polarization angle, is larger in the TeV than in the non-TeV sources. These differences between TeV and non-TeV samples seems to arise from differences between intermediate and high spectral peaking sources instead of the TeV detection. When the EVPA variations are studied, the rate of EVPA change is similar in both samples. We detect significant EVPA rotations in both TeV and non-TeV sources, showing that rotations can occur in high spectral peaking BL Lac objects when the monitoring cadence is dense enough. Our simulations show that we cannot exclude a random walk origin for these rotations. These results indicate that there are no intrinsic differences in the polarization properties of the TeV-detected and non-TeV-detected high-energy BL Lac objects. This suggests that the polarization properties are not directly related to the TeV-detection, but instead the TeV loudness is connected to the general flaring activity, redshift, and the synchrotron peak location. (Abridged)
  • We present a new set of optical polarization plane rotations in blazars, observed during the third year of operation of RoboPol. The entire set of rotation events discovered during three years of observations is analysed with the aim of determining whether these events are inherent in all blazars. It is found that the frequency of the polarization plane rotations varies widely among blazars. This variation cannot be explained either by a difference in the relativistic boosting or by selection effects caused by a difference in the average fractional polarization. We conclude that the rotations are characteristic of a subset of blazars and that they occur as a consequence of their intrinsic properties.
  • In diffuse molecular clouds, possible precursors of star-forming clouds, the effect of the magnetic field is unclear. In this work we compare the orientations of filamentary structures in the Polaris Flare, as seen through dust emission by Herschel, to the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field orientation ($\rm B_{pos}$) as revealed by stellar optical polarimetry with RoboPol. Dust structures in this translucent cloud show a strong preference for alignment with $\rm B_{pos}$. 70 % of field orientations are consistent with those of the filaments (within 30$^\circ$). We explore the spatial variation of the relative orientations and find it to be uncorrelated with the dust emission intensity and correlated to the dispersion of polarization angles. Concentrating in the area around the highest column density filament, and in the region with the most uniform field, we infer the $\rm B_{pos}$ strength to be 24 $-$ 120 $\mu$G. Assuming that the magnetic field can be decomposed into a turbulent and an ordered component, we find a turbulent-to-ordered ratio of 0.2 $-$ 0.8, implying that the magnetic field is dynamically important, at least in these two areas. We discuss implications on the 3D field properties, as well as on the distance estimate of the cloud.
  • We have carried out a search for filamentary structures in the Taurus molecular cloud using $\rm^{13}CO$ line emission data from the FCRAO survey of $\rm \sim100 \, deg^2$. We have used the topological analysis tool, DisPerSe, and post-processed its results to include a more strict definition of filaments that requires an aspect ratio of at least 3:1 and cross section intensity profiles peaked on the spine of the filament. In the velocity-integrated intensity map only 10 of the hundreds of filamentary structures identified by DisPerSe comply with our criteria. Unlike Herschel analyses, which find a characteristic width for filaments of $\rm \sim0.1 \, pc$, we find a much broader distribution of profile widths in our structures, with a peak at 0.4 pc. Furthermore, even if the identified filaments are cylindrical objects, their complicated velocity structure and velocity dispersions imply that they are probably gravitationally unbound. Analysis of velocity channel maps reveals the existence of hundreds of `velocity-coherent' filaments. The distribution of their widths is peaked at lower values (0.2 pc) while the fluctuation of their peak intensities is indicative of stochastic origin. These filaments are suppressed in the integrated intensity map due to the blending of diffuse emission from different velocities. Conversely, integration over velocities can cause filamentary structures to appear. Such apparent filaments can also be traced, using the same methodology, in simple simulated maps consisting of randomly placed cores. They have profile shapes similar to observed filaments and contain most of the simulated cores.
  • We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realised in nature.