• The occurrence of charge-density-wave (CDW) order in underdoped cuprates is now well established, although the precise nature of the CDW and its relationship with superconductivity is not. Theoretical proposals include contrasting ideas such as that pairing may be driven by CDW fluctuations or that static CDWs may intertwine with a spatially-modulated superconducting wave function. We test the dynamics of CDW order in La$_{1.825}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_4$ by using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) at the CDW wave vector, detected resonantly at the Cu $L_3$-edge. We find that the CDW domains are strikingly static, with no evidence of significant fluctuations up to 2\,\nicefrac{3}{4} hours. We discuss the implications of these results for some of the competing theories.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • We address the controversy over the proximity effect between topological materials and high T$_{c}$ superconductors. Junctions are produced between Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+\delta}$ and materials with different Fermi surfaces (Bi$_{2}$Te$_{3}$ \& graphite). Both cases reveal tunneling spectra consistent with Andreev reflection. This is confirmed by magnetic field that shifts features via the Doppler effect. This is modeled with a single parameter that accounts for tunneling into a screening supercurrent. Thus the tunneling involves Cooper pairs crossing the heterostructure, showing the Fermi surface mis-match does not hinder the ability to form transparent interfaces, which is accounted for by the extended Brillouin zone and different lattice symmetries.
  • Recently there has been reinvigorated interest in the superconducting proximity effect, driven by predictions of the emergence of Majorana fermions. To help guide this search, we have developed a phenomenological model for the tunneling spectra in anisotropic superconductor-normal metal proximity devices. We combine successful approaches used in s-wave proximity and standard d-wave tunneling to reproduce tunneling spectra in d-wave proximity devices, and clarify the origin of various features. Different variations of the pair potential are considered, resulting from the proximity-induced superconductivity. Furthermore, the effective pair potential felt by the quasiparticles is momentum-dependent in contrast to s-wave superconductors. The probabilities of reflection and transmission are calculated by solving the Bogoliubov equations. Our results are consistent with experimental observations of the unconventional proximity effect and provide important experimental parameters such as the size and length scale of the proximity induced gap, as well as the conditions needed to observe the reduced and full superconducting gaps.
  • We report $^{139}$La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La$_{1.875}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_4$ single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal $\rightarrow$ low-temperature orthorhombic $\rightarrow$ low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The $^{139}$La spin-lattice relaxation rate $T_1^{-1}$ sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature $T_\text{CO}$ = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the $T_1^{-1}$ below the spin-ordering temperature $T_\text{SO}$ = 40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for $H \parallel [001]$, which are completely suppressed for large fields along the CuO$_2$ planes. Our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.
  • The key ingredients in any superconductor are the Cooper pairs, in which two electrons combine to form a composite boson. In all conventional superconductors the pairing strength alone sets the majority of the physical properties including the superconducting transition temperature T$_c$. In the cuprate high temperature superconductors, no such link has yet been found between the pairing interactions and T$_c$. Using a new variant of photoelectron spectroscopy we measure both the pair-forming ($\Delta$) and a self energy/pair-breaking term ($\Gamma_s$) as a function of sample type and sample temperature, and we make the measurements over a wide range of doping and temperatures within and outside of the pseudogap/competing order doping regimes. In all cases we find that T$_c$ is approximately set by a crossover between the pair-forming strength $\Delta$ and 3 times the self-energy term $\Gamma_s$ - a new paradigm for superconductivity. In addition to departing from conventional superconductivity in which the pairing alone sets T$_c$, these results indicate the zero-order importance of the near-nodal self-energy effects compared to competing order/pseudogap effects.
  • We report femtosecond resonant soft X-ray diffraction measurements of the dynamics of the charge order and of the crystal lattice in non-superconducting, stripe-ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4. Excitation of the in-plane Cu-O stretching phonon with a mid-infrared pulse has been previously shown to induce a transient superconducting state in the closely related compound La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO4. In La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, we find that the charge stripe order melts promptly on a sub-picosecond time scale. Surprisingly, the low temperature tetragonal distortion is only weakly reduced, reacting on significantly longer time scales that do not correlate with light-induced superconductivity. This experiment suggests that charge modulations alone, and not the LTT distortion, prevent superconductivity in equilibrium.
  • High-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta/Bi2Te2Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.
  • Perfect fluids are characterized as having the smallest ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, {\eta}/s, consistent with quantum uncertainty and causality. So far, nearly perfect fluids have only been observed in the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and in unitary atomic Fermi gases (UFG), exotic systems that are amongst the hottest and coldest objects in the known universe, respectively. We use Angle Resolve Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to measure the temperature dependence of an electronic analogue of {\eta}/s in an optimally doped cuprate high temperature superconductor, finding it too is a nearly perfect fluid around, and above, its superconducting transition temperature Tc.
  • Heavily electron-doped surfaces of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ have been studied by spin and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Upon doping, electrons occupy a series of {\bf k}-split pairs of states above the topological surface state. The {\bf k}-splitting originates from the large spin-orbit coupling and results in a Rashba-type behavior, unequivocally demonstrated here via the spin analysis. The spin helicities of the lowest laying Rashba doublet and the adjacent topological surface state alternate in a left-right-left sequence. This spin configuration sets constraints to inter-band scattering channels opened by electron doping. A detailed analysis of the scattering rates suggests that intra-band scattering dominates with the largest effect coming from warping of the Fermi surface.
  • The Fermi surface topologies of underdoped samples the high-Tc superconductor Bi2212 have been measured with angle resolved photoemission. By examining thermally excited states above the Fermi level, we show that the Fermi surfaces in the pseudogap phase of underdoped samples are actually composed of fully enclosed hole pockets. The spectral weight of these pockets is vanishingly small at the anti-ferromagnetic zone boundary, which creates the illusion of Fermi "arcs" in standard photoemission measurements. The area of the pockets as measured in this study is consistent with the doping level, and hence carrier density, of the samples measured. Furthermore, the shape and area of the pockets is well reproduced by a phenomenological model of the pseudogap phase as a spin liquid.
  • Conventional superconductors are characterized by a single energy scale, the superconducting gap, which is proportional to the critical temperature Tc . In hole-doped high-Tc copper oxide superconductors, previous experiments have established the existence of two distinct energy scales for doping levels below the optimal one. The origin and significance of these two scales are largely unexplained, although they have often been viewed as evidence for two gaps, possibly of distinct physical origins. By measuring the temperature dependence of the electronic Raman response of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d (Bi-2212) and HgBa2CuO4+d (Hg-1201) crystals with different doping levels, we establish that these two scales are associated with coherent excitations of the superconducting state which disappears at Tc. Using a simple model, we show that these two scales do not require the existence of two gaps. Rather, a single d-wave superconducting gap with a loss of Bogoliubov quasiparticle spectral weight in the antinodal region is shown to reconcile spectroscopic and transport measurements.
  • Laser based photoemission with photons of energy 6 eV is used to examine the fine details of the very low energy electron dispersion and associated dynamics in the nodal region of optimally doped Bi2212. A "kink" in the dispersion in the immediate vicinity of the Fermi energy is associated with scattering from an optical phonon previously identified in Raman studies. The identification of this phonon as the appropriate mode is confirmed by comparing the scattering rates observed experimentally with the results of calculated scattering rates based on the properties of the phonon mode.
  • We present new x-ray and neutron scattering measurements of stripe order in La(1.875)Ba(0.125)CuO(4), along with low-field susceptibility, thermal conductivity, and specific heat data. We compare these with previously reported results for resistivity and thermopower. Temperature-dependent features indicating transitions (or crossovers) are correlated among the various experimental quantities. Taking into account recent spectroscopic studies, we argue that the most likely interpretation of the complete collection of results is that an unusual form of two-dimensional superconducting correlations appears together with the onset of spin-stripe order. Recent theoretical proposals for a sinusoidally-modulated superconducting state compatible with stripe order provide an intriguing explanation of our results and motivate further experimental tests. We also discuss evidence for one-dimensional pairing correlations that appear together with the charge order. With regard to the overall phenomenology, we consider the degree to which similar behavior may have been observed in other cuprates, and describe possible connections to various puzzling phenomena in cuprate superconductors.
  • We have carried out a detailed investigation of the magnetic field dependence of charge ordering in La2-xBaxCuO4 (x~1/8) utilizing high-resolution x-ray scattering. We find that the charge order correlation length increases as the magnetic field greater than ~5T is applied in the superconducting phase (T=2K). The observed unusual field dependence of the charge order correlation length suggests that the static charge stripe order competes with the superconducting ground state in this sample.
  • Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the Cu-O bond-stretching vibrations in optimally doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 (Tc = 35 K) and in two other cuprates showing static stripe order at low temperatures, i.e. La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4 and La1.875Ba0.125CuO4. All three compounds exhibit a very similar phonon anomaly, which is not predicted by conventional band theory. It is argued that the phonon anomaly reflects a coupling to charge inhomogeneities in the form of stripes, which remain dynamic in superconducting La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 down to the lowest temperatures. These results show that the phonon effect indicating stripe formation is not restricted to a narrow region of the phase diagram around the so-called 1/8 anomaly but occurs in optimally doped samples as well.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission to unravel the quasiparticle decoherence process in the high-$T_c$ cuprates. The coherent band is highly renormalized, and the incoherent part manifests itself as a nearly vertical ``dive'' in the $E$-$k$ intensity plot that approaches the bare band bottom. We find that the coherence-incoherence crossover energies in the hole- and electron-doped cuprates are quite different, but scale to their corresponding bare bandwidth. This rules out antiferromagnetic fluctuations as the main source for decoherence. We also observe the coherent band bottom at the zone center, whose intensity is strongly suppressed by the decoherence process. Consequently, the coherent band dispersion for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates is obtained, and is qualitatively consistent with the framework of Gutzwiller projection.
  • In conventional metals, electron-phonon coupling, or the phonon-mediated interaction between electrons, has long been known to be the pairing interaction responsible for the superconductivity. The strength of this interaction essentially determines the superconducting transition temperature TC. One manifestation of electron-phonon coupling is a mass renormalization of the electronic dispersion at the energy scale associated with the phonons. This renormalization is directly observable in photoemission experiments. In contrast, there remains little consensus on the pairing mechanism in cuprate high temperature superconductors. The recent observation of similar renormalization effects in cuprates has raised the hope that the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity may finally be resolved. The focus has been on the low energy renormalization and associated "kink" in the dispersion at around 50 meV. However at that energy scale, there are multiple candidates including phonon branches, structure in the spin-fluctuation spectrum, and the superconducting gap itself, making the unique identification of the excitation responsible for the kink difficult. Here we show that the low-energy renormalization at ~50 meV is only a small component of the total renormalization, the majority of which occurs at an order of magnitude higher energy (~350 meV). This high energy kink poses a new challenge for the physics of the cuprates. Its role in superconductivity and relation to the low-energy kink remains to be determined.
  • The attempt to understand cuprate superconductors is complicated by the presence of multiple strong interactions. While many believe that antiferromagnetism is important for the superconductivity, there has been revived interest in the role of electron-lattice coupling. The recently studied conventional superconductor MgB2 has a very strong electron-lattice coupling, involving a particular vibrational mode (phonon), that was predicted by standard theory and confirmed quantitatively by experiment. Here we present inelastic scattering measurements that show a similarly strong anomaly in the Cu-O bond-stretching phonon in the cuprate superconductors La2-xSrxCuO4 (with x=0.07, 0.15). This is in contrast to conventional theory, which does not predict such behavior. The anomaly is strongest in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 and La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4, compounds that exhibit spatially modulated charge and magnetic order, often called stripe order. It occurs at a wave vector corresponding to the charge order. These results suggest that this giant electron-phonon anomaly, which is absent in undoped and over-doped non-superconductors, is associated with charge inhomogeneity. It follows that electron-phonon coupling may be important to our understanding of superconductivity, although its contribution to the mechanism is likely to be indirect.
  • Heterodyne polarometry is used to measure the frequency dependence in the mid IR from 900 to 1100 cm$^-1$ and temperature dependence from 35 to 330 K of the normal state Hall transport in single crystal, optimally doped Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$. The results show a simple Drude behavior in the Hall conductivity $\sigma_{xy}$ which stands in contrast to the more complex, extended Drude behavior for the longitudinal conductivity $\sigma_{xx}$. The mid IR Hall scattering rate $\gamma_{xy}$ increases linearly with temperature and has a small, positive, projected intercept at T=0. The longitudinal scatter rate, in contrast, is much larger and exhibits very little temperature dependnece. The Hall frequency indicates a carrier mass which is 6.7 times the band mass and which decreases slighly with increasing frequency. These disparate behaviors are consistent with calculations based on the fluctuation-exchange interaction using current vertex corrections.
  • Muon spin relaxation ($\mu$SR) measurements in high transverse magnetic fields ($\parallel \hat c$) revealed strong field-induced quasi-static magnetism in the underdoped and Eu doped (La,Sr)$_{2}$CuO$_{4}$ and La$_{1.875}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_{4}$, existing well above $T_{c}$ and $T_{N}$. The susceptibility-counterpart of Cu spin polarization, derived from the muon spin relaxation rate, exhibits a divergent behavior towards $T \sim 25$ K. No field-induced magnetism was detected in overdoped La$_{1.81}$Sr$_{0.19}$CuO$_{4}$, optimally doped Bi2212, and Zn-doped YBa$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{7}$.
  • We use 300 K reflectance data to investigate the normal-state electrodynamics of the high temperature superconductor Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+\delta}$ over a wide range of doping levels. The data show that at this temperature the free carriers are coupled to a continuous spectrum of fluctuations. Assuming the Marginal Fermi Liquid (MFL) form as a first approximation for the fluctuation spectrum, the doping-dependent coupling constant $\lambda (p)$ can be estimated directly from the slope of the reflectance spectrum. We find that $\lambda (p)$ decreases smoothly with the hole doping level, from underdoped samples with $ p=0.103$ ($T_c = 67$ K) where $\lambda (p)= 0.93$ to overdoped samples with $p=0.226$, ($T_c= 60$ K) where $\lambda(p)= 0.53$. An analysis of the intercept and curvature of the reflectance spectrum shows deviations from the MFL spectrum symmetrically placed at the optimal doping point $p=0.16$. The Kubo formula for the conductivity gives a better fit to the experiments with the MFL spectrum up to 2000 cm$^{-1}$ and with an additional Drude component or an additional Lorentz component up to 7000 cm$^{-1}$. By comparing three different model fits we conclude that the MFL channel is necessary for a good fit to the reflectance data. Finally, we note that the monotonic variation of the reflectance slope with doping provides us with an independent measure of the doping level for the Bi-2212 system.
  • We have recently used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the magnetic excitation spectrum of La(1.875)Ba(0.125)CuO(4) up to 200 meV. This particular cuprate is of interest because it exhibits static charge and spin stripe order. The observed spectrum is remarkably similar to that found in superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6+x) and La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4); the main differences are associated with the spin gap. We suggest that essentially all observed features of the magnetic scattering from cuprate superconductors can be described by a universal magnetic excitation spectrum multiplied by a spin gap function with a material-dependent spin-gap energy.
  • We present a new method of extracting electron-boson spectral function $\alpha^2$F($\omega$) from infrared and photoemission data. This procedure is based on inverse theory and will be shown to be superior to previous techniques. Numerical implementation of the algorithm is presented in detail and then used to accurately determine the doping and temperature dependence of the spectral function in several families of high-T$_c$ superconductors. Principal limitations of extracting $\alpha^2$F($\omega$) from experimental data will be pointed out. We directly compare the IR and ARPES $\alpha^2$F($\omega$) and discuss the resonance structure in the spectra in terms of existing theoretical models.
  • The fundamental mechanism that gives rise to high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity in the copper oxide materials has been debated since the discovery of the phenomenon. Recent work has focussed on a sharp 'kink' in the kinetic energy spectra of the electrons as a possible signature of the force that creates the superconducting state. The kink has been related to a magnetic resonance and also to phonons. Here we report that infrared spectra of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+d), (Bi-2212) show that this sharp feature can be separated from a broad background and, interestingly, weakens with doping before disappearing completely at a critical doping level of 0.23 holes per copper atom. Superconductivity is still strong in terms of the transition temperature (Tc approx 55 K), so our results rule out both the magnetic resonance peak and phonons as the principal cause of high-Tc superconductivity. The broad background, on the other hand, is a universal property of the copper oxygen plane and a good candidate for the 'glue' that binds the electrons.