• Large-area PhotoMultiplier Tubes (PMT) allow to efficiently instrument Liquid Scintillator (LS) neutrino detectors, where large target masses are pivotal to compensate for neutrinos' extremely elusive nature. Depending on the detector light yield, several scintillation photons stemming from the same neutrino interaction are likely to hit a single PMT in a few tens/hundreds of nanoseconds, resulting in several photoelectrons (PEs) to pile-up at the PMT anode. In such scenario, the signal generated by each PE is entangled to the others, and an accurate PMT charge reconstruction becomes challenging. This manuscript describes an experimental method able to address the PMT charge reconstruction in the case of large PE pile-up, providing an unbiased charge estimator at the permille level up to 15 detected PEs. The method is based on a signal filtering technique (Wiener filter) which suppresses the noise due to both PMT and readout electronics, and on a Fourier-based deconvolution able to minimize the influence of signal distortions ---such as an overshoot. The analysis of simulated PMT waveforms shows that the slope of a linear regression modeling the relation between reconstructed and true charge values improves from $0.769 \pm 0.001$ (without deconvolution) to $0.989 \pm 0.001$ (with deconvolution), where unitary slope implies perfect reconstruction. A C++ implementation of the charge reconstruction algorithm is available online at http://www.fe.infn.it/CRA .
  • The excess of solar-neutrino events above 13 MeV that has been recently observed by Superkamiokande can be explained by vacuum oscillations (VO). If the boron neutrino flux is 20% smaller than the standard solar model (SSM) prediction and the chlorine signal is assumed 30% (or 3.5 sigmas) higher than the measured one, there exists a VO solution that reproduces both the observed boron neutrino spectrum, including the high energy distortion, and the other measured neutrino rates. This solution might already be testable by the predicted anomalous seasonal variation of the gallium signal. Its most distinct signature, a large anomalous seasonal variation of Be7 neutrino flux, can be easily observed by the future detectors, BOREXINO and LENS.
  • The anisotropy of the positrons emitted in the reaction $\bar{\nu}_{e}+p\to n+e^{+}$ has to be taken into account for extracting an antineutrino signal in Superkamiokande. For the Sun, this effect allows a sensitivity to $\nu_{e}\to\bar{\nu}_{e}$ transition probability at the 3% level already with the statistics collected in the first hundred days. For a supernova in the Galaxy, the effect is crucial for extracting the correct ratio of $\nu-e$ to $\bar\nu_{e}-p$ events.
  • After a short survey of the physics of solar neutrinos, giving an overview of hydrogen burning reactions, predictions of standard solar models and results of solar neutrino experiments, we discuss the solar-model-independent indications in favour of non-standard neutrino properties. The experimental results look to be in contradiction with each other, even disregarding some experiment: unless electron neutrinos disappear in their trip from the sun to the earth, the fluxes of intermediate energy neutrinos (those from 7Be electron capture and from the CNO cycle) result to be unphysically negative, or anyway extremely reduced with respect to standard solar model predictions. Next we review extensively non-standard solar models built as attempts to solve the solar neutrino puzzle. The dependence of the central solar temperature on chemical composition, opacity, age and on the values of the astrophysical S-factors for hydrogen-burning reactions is carefully investigated. Also, possible modifications of the branching among the various pp-chains in view of nuclear physics uncertainties are examined. Assuming standard neutrinos, all solar models examined fail in reconciling theory with experiments, even when the physical and chemical inputs are radically changed with respect to present knowledge and even if some of the experimental results are discarded.
  • Recent solar neutrino results together with the assumption of a stationary Sun imply severe constraints on the individual components of the total neutrino flux : $\Phi_{Be} \leq 0.7 \cdot 10^{9} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, \Phi_{CNO} \leq 0.6 \cdot 10^{9} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and $64 \cdot 10^{9} cm^{-2} s^{-1} \leq \Phi_{pp+pep} \leq 65 \cdot 10^{9} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ (at 1$ \sigma$ level), the constraint on $\nu_{Be}$ being in strong disagreement with $\Phi_{Be}^{SSM} = 5 \cdot 10^{9} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. We study a large variety of non-standard solar models with low inner temperatures, finding that the temperature profiles T(m) follow the homology relationship: T(m)=k$T(m)^{SSM}$, so that they are specified just by the central temperature $T_{c}$. There is no value of $T_{c}$ which can account for all the available experimental results and also if we restrict to consider just Gallium and Kamiokande results the fit is poor. Finally we discuss what can be learned from new generation experiments, planned for the detection of monochromatic solar neutrinos, about the properties of neutrinos and of the Sun.