• SS~433 is an X-ray binary and the source of sub-relativistic, precessing, baryonic jets. We present high-resolution spectrograms of SS 433 in the infrared H and K bands. The spectrum is dominated by hydrogen and helium emission lines. The precession phase of the emission lines from the jet continues to be described by a constant period, P_jet= 162.375 d. The limit on any secularly changing period is $|\dot P| \lesssim 10^{-5}$. The He I 2.0587 micron line has complex and variable P Cygni absorption features produced by an inhomogeneous wind with a maximum outflow velocity near 900 km/s. The He II emission lines in the spectrum also arise in this wind. The higher members of the hydrogen Brackett lines show a double-peaked profile with symmetric wings extending more than +/-1500 km/s from the line center. The lines display radial velocity variations in phase with the radial velocity variation expected of the compact star, and they show a distortion during disk eclipse that we interpret as a rotational distortion. We fit the line profiles with a model in which the emission comes from the surface of a symmetric, Keplerian accretion disk around the compact object. The outer edge of the disk has velocities that vary from 110 to 190 km/s. These comparatively low velocities place an important constraint on the mass of the compact star: Its mass must be less than 2.2 M_solar and is probably less than 1.6 M_solar.
  • The young system RX J0529.3+1210 was initially identified as a single-lined spectroscopic binary. Using high-resolution infrared spectra, acquired with NIRSPEC on Keck II, we measured radial velocities for the secondary. The method of using the infrared regime to convert single-lined spectra into double-lined spectra, and derive the mass ratio for the binary system, has been successfully used for a number of young, low-mass binaries. For RX J0529.3+1210, a long- period(462 days) and highly eccentric(0.88) binary system, we determine the mass ratio to be 0.78+/-0.05 using the infrared double-lined velocity data alone, and 0.73+/-0.23 combining visible light and infrared data in a full orbital solution. The large uncertainty in the latter is the result of the sparse sampling in the infrared and the high eccentricity: the stars do not have a large velocity separation during most of their ~1.3 year orbit. A mass ratio close to unity, consistent with the high end of the one sigma uncertainty for this mass ratio value, is inconsistent with the lack of a visible light detection of the secondary component. We outline several scenarios for a color difference in the two stars, such as one heavily spotted component, higher order multiplicity, or a unique evolutionary stage, favoring detection of only the primary star in visible light, even in a mass ratio ~1 system. However, the evidence points to a lower ratio. Although RX J0529.3+1210 exhibits no excess at near-infrared wavelengths, a small 24 micron excess is detected, consistent with circumbinary dust. The properties of this binary and its membership in Lambda Ori versus a new nearby stellar moving group at ~90 pc are discussed. We speculate on the origin of this unusual system and on the impact of such high eccentricity on the potential for planet formation.