• We summarize the status of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) in galaxy clusters. The observed acceleration is typically larger than the acceleration threshold of MOND in the central regions, implying that some dark matter is necessary to explain the mass discrepancy there. A plausible resolution of this issue is that the unseen mass in MOND is in the form of ordinary neutrinos with masses just below the experimentally detectable limit. In particular, we show that the lensing mass reconstructions of the clusters 1E0657-56 (the bullet cluster) and Cl0024+17 (the ring) do not pose a new challenge to this scenario. However, the mass discrepancy for cool X-ray emitting groups, in which neutrinos cannot cluster, pose a more serious problem, meaning that dark baryons could present a more satisfactory solution to the problem of unseen mass in MOND clusters.
  • The self-binding energy and stability of a galaxy in MOND-based gravity are curiously decreasing functions of its center of mass acceleration towards neighbouring mass concentrations. A tentative indication of this breaking of the Strong Equivalence Principle in field galaxies is the RAVE-observed escape speed in the Milky Way. Another consequence is that satellites of field galaxies will move on nearly Keplerian orbits at large radii (100 - 500 kpc), with a declining speed below the asymptotically constant naive MOND prediction. But consequences of an environment-sensitive gravity are even more severe in clusters, where member galaxies accelerate fast: no more Dark-Halo-like potential is present to support galaxies, meaning that extended axisymmetric disks of gas and stars are likely unstable. These predicted reappearance of asymptotic Keplerian velocity curves and disappearance of "stereotypic galaxies" in clusters are falsifiable with targeted surveys.