• We carried out an extensive observational study of the Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) star, HD 25558. The ~2000 spectra obtained at different observatories, the ground-based and MOST satellite light curves revealed that this object is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of about 9 years. The observations do not allow the inference of an orbital solution. We determined the physical parameters of the components, and found that both lie within the SPB instability strip. Accordingly, both show line-profile variations due to stellar pulsations. Eleven independent frequencies were identified in the data. All the frequencies were attributed to one of the two components based on Pixel-by-pixel variability analysis of the line profiles. Spectroscopic and photometric mode identification was also performed for the frequencies of both stars. These results suggest that the inclination and rotation of the two components are rather different. The primary is a slow rotator with ~6 d period, seen at ~60 deg inclination, while the secondary rotates fast with ~1.2 d period, and is seen at ~20 inclination. Spectropolarimetric measurements revealed that the secondary component has a magnetic field with at least a few hundred Gauss strength, while no magnetic field can be detected in the primary.
  • We model the photometry of RS CVn star $\sigma$ Geminorum to obtain new information on the changes of the surface starspot distribution, i.e., activity cycles, differential rotation and active longitudes. We use the previously published Continuous Periods Search-method (CPS) to analyse V-band differential photometry obtained between the years 1987 and 2010 with the T3 0.4 m Automated Telescope at the Fairborn Observatory. The CPS-method divides data into short subsets and then models the light curves with Fourier-models of variable orders and provides estimates of the mean magnitude, amplitude, period and light curve minima. These light curve parameters are then analysed for signs of activity cycles, differential rotation and active longitudes. We confirm the presence of two previously found stable active longitudes, synchronised with the orbital period $P_{\rm{orb}}=19.60$d and find eight events where the active longitudes are disrupted. The epochs of the primary light curve minima rotate with a shorter period $P_{\rm{min,1}}=19.47$d than the orbital motion. If the variations in the photometric rotation period were to be caused by differential rotation, this would give a differential rotation coefficient of $\alpha \ge 0.103$. The presence of two slightly different periods of active regions may indicate a superposition of two dynamo modes, one stationary in the orbital frame and the other one propagating in the azimuthal direction. Our estimate of the differential rotation is much higher than previous results. However, simulations show that this can be caused by insufficient sampling in our data.
  • Our aim was to study the light curve periodicity of the solar analogue V352 CMa and in particular show that the presence or absence of periodicity in low amplitude light curves can be modelled with the Continuous Period Search (CPS) method. We applied the CPS method to 14 years of V-band photometry of V352 CMa and obtained estimates for the mean, amplitude, period and minima of the light curves in the selected datasets. We also applied the Power Spectrum Method (PSM) to these datasets and compared the performance of this frequently applied method to that of CPS. We detected signs of a $11.7 \pm 0.5$ year cycle in in the mean brightness. The long-term average photometric rotation period was $7.24 \pm 0.22$ days. The lower limit for the differential rotation coefficient would be $|k| > 0.12$, if the law of solar surface differential rotation were valid for V352 CMa and the period changes traced this phenomenon. Signs of stable active longitudes rotating with a period of $7.157 \pm 0.002$ days were detected from the epochs of the light minima with the Kuiper method. CPS performed better than the traditional PSM, because the latter always used a sinusoidal model for the data even when this was clearly not the correct model.
  • We analyze photometric data of the active RS CVn--type star HR 1099 for the years 1975--2006 with an inversion technique and reveal the nature of two activity cycles of 15--16 yr and 5.3$\pm$0.1 yr duration. The 16 yr cycle is related to variations of the total spot area and is coupled with the differential rotation, while the 5.3 yr cycle is caused by the symmetric redistribution of the spotted area between the opposite stellar hemispheres (flip-flop cycle). We recover long-lived active regions comprising two active longitudes that migrate in the orbital reference frame with a variable rate because of the differential rotation along with changes in the mean spot latitudes. The migration pattern is periodic with the 16 yr cycle. Combining the longitudinal migration of the active regions with a previously measured differential rotation law, we recover the first stellar butterfly diagram without an assumption about spot shapes. We find that mean latitudes of active regions at opposite longitudes change antisymmetrically in the course of the 16 yr cycle: while one active region migrates to the pole, the other approaches the equator. This suggests a precession of the global magnetic field with respect to the stellar rotational axis.
  • We report the results of a globally coordinated photometric campaign to search for transits by the P ~ 30 d and P ~ 60 d outer planets of the 3-planet system orbiting the nearby M-dwarf Gl 876. These two planets experience strong mutual perturbations, which necessitate use of a dynamical (four-body) model to compute transit ephemerides for the system. Our photometric data have been collected from published archival sources, as well as from our photometric campaigns that were targeted to specific transit predictions. Our analysis indicates that transits by planet "c" (P ~ 30 d) do not currently occur, in concordance with the best-fit i = 50 degree co-planar configuration obtained by dynamical fits to the most recent radial velocity data for the system. Transits by planet "b" (P ~ 60 d) are not entirely ruled out by our observations, but our data indicate that it is very unlikely that they occur. Our experience with the Gl 876 system suggests that a distributed ground-based network of small telescopes can be used to search for transits of very low mass M-stars by terrestrial-sized planets.