• We study the possibility of the LHeC facility to disentangle different new physics contributions to the production of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos in the lepton number violating channel $e^{-}p\rightarrow l_{j}^{+} + 3 jets$ ($l_j\equiv e ,\mu $). This is done investigating the angular and polarization trails of effective operators with distinct Dirac-Lorentz structure contributing to the Majorana neutrino production, which parameterize new physics from a higher energy scale. We study an asymmetry in the angular distribution of the final anti-lepton and the initial electron polarization effect on the number of signal events produced by the vectorial and scalar effective interactions, finding both analyses could well separate their contributions.
  • We show that the semidirect product of a group $C$ by $A*_D B$ is isomorphic to the free product of $A\rtimes C$ and $B\rtimes C$ amalgamated at $D\rtimes C$, where $A$, $B$ and $C$ are arbitrary groups. Moreover, we apply this theorem to prove that any group $G$ that acts without inversion on a tree $T$ that possesses a segment $\Gamma$ for its quotient graph, such that, if the stabilizers of the vertex set $\{\,P,Q\,\}$ and edge $y$ of a lift of $\, \Gamma$ in $T$ are of the form $G_{P}\!\rtimes H$, $G_{Q}\!\rtimes H$ and $G_{y}\! \rtimes H$, then $G$ is isomorphic to the semidirect product of $H$ by $(\,G_P \,*_{G_y} \,G_Q \,)$. Using our results we conclude with a non-standard verification of the isomorphism between $GL_2(\mathbb{Z})$ and the free product of the dihedral groups $D_4$ and $D_6$ amalgamated at their Klein-four group.
  • We study the effects produced by sterile Majorana neutrinos on the $\nu_{\tau}$ flux traversing the Earth, considering the interaction between the Majorana neutrinos and the standard matter as modeled by an effective theory. The surviving tau-neutrino flux is calculated using transport equations including Majorana neutrino production and decay. We compare our results with the pure Standard Model interactions, computing the surviving flux for different values of the effective lagrangian couplings, considering the detected flux by IceCube for an operation time of ten years, and Majorana neutrinos with mass $m_N \thicksim m_{\tau}$.
  • There are several public key establishment protocols as well as complete public key cryptosystems based on allegedly hard problems from combinatorial (semi)group theory known by now. Most of these problems are search problems, i.e., they are of the following nature: given a property P and the information that there are objects with the property P, find at least one particular object with the property P. So far, no cryptographic protocol based on a search problem in a non-commutative (semi)group has been recognized as secure enough to be a viable alternative to established protocols (such as RSA) based on commutative (semi)groups, although most of these protocols are more efficient than RSA is. In this paper, we suggest to use decision problems from combinatorial group theory as the core of a public key establishment protocol or a public key cryptosystem. By using a popular decision problem, the word problem, we design a cryptosystem with the following features: (1) Bob transmits to Alice an encrypted binary sequence which Alice decrypts correctly with probability "very close" to 1; (2) the adversary, Eve, who is granted arbitrarily high (but fixed) computational speed, cannot positively identify (at least, in theory), by using a "brute force attack", the "1" or "0" bits in Bob's binary sequence. In other words: no matter what computational speed we grant Eve at the outset, there is no guarantee that her "brute force attack" program will give a conclusive answer (or an answer which is correct with overwhelming probability) about any bit in Bob's sequence.
  • After some excitement generated by recently suggested public key exchange protocols due to Anshel-Anshel-Goldfeld and Ko-Lee et al., it is a prevalent opinion now that the conjugacy search problem is unlikely to provide sufficient level of security if a braid group is used as the platform. In this paper we address the following questions: (1) whether choosing a different group, or a class of groups, can remedy the situation; (2) whether some other "hard" problem from combinatorial group theory can be used, instead of the conjugacy search problem, in a public key exchange protocol. Another question that we address here, although somewhat vague, is likely to become a focus of the future research in public key cryptography based on symbolic computation: (3) whether one can efficiently disguise an element of a given group (or a semigroup) by using defining relations.