• We study the size and the specific angular momentum of galaxies in a state-of-the-art semi-analytic model. Our model includes a specific treatment for the exchange of angular momentum between different galactic components. Disk scale radii are estimated from the angular momentum of the gaseous/stellar disk, while bulge sizes are estimated using energy conservation arguments. The predicted size-mass and angular momentum-mass relations are in good agreement with observational measurements in the local Universe, provided a treatment for gas dissipation during major mergers is included. Our treatment for disk instability leads to unrealistically small radii of bulges formed predominantly through disk instability, and predicts an offset between the size-mass relations predicted for central and satellite early-type galaxies, that is not observed in real samples. The model reproduces well the observed dependence on morphology, and predicts a strong correlation between the specific angular momentum of galaxies and their cold gas content. We find that this correlation is a natural consequence of galaxy evolution: gas-rich galaxies form in smaller halos, and form stars gradually until present day, while gas-poor ones reside in large halos, and form most of their stars at early epochs, when the angular momentum of their parent halos is low. The dynamical and structural properties of galaxies in the local Universe can be strongly affected by a different treatment for stellar feedback, as this would modify the star formation history of model galaxies. A higher angular momentum for gas accreted through rapid mode does not affect significantly the properties of massive galaxies today, but has a more important effect on low-mass galaxies and at higher redshift.
  • A major question in galaxy formation is how the gas supply that fuels activity in galaxies is modulated by their environment. We use spectroscopy of a set of well characterized clusters and groups at $0.4<z<0.8$ from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) and compare it to identically selected field galaxies. Our spectroscopy allows us to isolate galaxies that are dominated by old stellar populations. Here we study a stellar-mass limited sample ($\log(M_*/M_\odot)>10.4$) of these old galaxies with weak [OII] emission. We use line ratios and compare to studies of local early type galaxies to conclude that this gas is likely excited by post-AGB stars and hence represents a diffuse gas component in the galaxies. For cluster and group galaxies the fraction with EW([OII])$>5$\AA\ is $f_{[OII]}=0.08^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ and $f_{[OII]}=0.06^{+0.07}_{-0.04}$ respectively. For field galaxies we find $f_{[OII]}=0.27^{+0.07}_{-0.06}$, representing a 2.8$\sigma$ difference between the [OII] fractions for old galaxies between the different environments. We conclude that a population of old galaxies in all environments has ionized gas that likely stems from stellar mass loss. In the field galaxies also experience gas accretion from the cosmic web and in groups and clusters these galaxies have had their gas accretion shut off by their environment. Additionally, galaxies with emission preferentially avoid the virialized region of the cluster in position-velocity space. We discuss the implications of our results, among which is that gas accretion shutoff is likely effective at group halo masses (log~${\cal M}/$\msol$>12.8$) and that there are likely multiple gas removal processes happening in dense environments.
  • We update our recently published model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA), to include a self-consistent treatment of the partition of cold gas in atomic and molecular hydrogen. Our model provides significant improvements with respect to previous ones used for similar studies. In particular, GAEA (i) includes a sophisticated chemical enrichment scheme accounting for non-instantaneous recycling of gas, metals, and energy; (ii) reproduces the measured evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function; (iii) reasonably reproduces the observed correlation between galaxy stellar mass and gas metallicity at different redshifts. These are important prerequisites for models considering a metallicity dependent efficiency of molecular gas formation. We also update our model for disk sizes and show that model predictions are in nice agreement with observational estimates for the gas, stellar and star forming disks at different cosmic epochs. We analyse the influence of different star formation laws including empirical relations based on the hydro-static pressure of the disk, analytic models, and prescriptions derived from detailed hydro-dynamical simulations. We find that modifying the star formation law does not affect significantly the global properties of model galaxies, neither their distributions. The only quantity showing significant deviations in different models is the cosmic molecular-to-atomic hydrogen ratio, particularly at high redshift. Unfortunately, however, this quantity also depends strongly on the modelling adopted for additional physical processes. Useful constraints on the physical processes regulating star formation can be obtained focusing on low mass galaxies and/or at higher redshift. In this case, self-regulation has not yet washed out differences imprinted at early time.
  • We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at $1<z<1.5$, selected to span a factor $>10$ in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over $\lambda\sim 0.6$--$1.05\mu$m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes $z^{\prime}<24.25$ and [3.6]$\mu$m$<22.5$, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses $M_\ast\gtrsim10^{10.3}M_\odot$, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning $u$ through $K$, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6$\mu$m. The spectroscopy is $\sim 50$ per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of $\sim 500$ new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • We study galaxy mass assembly and cosmic star formation rate (SFR) at high-redshift (z$\gt$4), by comparing data from multiwavelength surveys with predictions from the GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA) model. GAEA implements a stellar feedback scheme partially based on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, that features strong stellar driven outflows and mass-dependent timescale for the re-accretion of ejected gas. In previous work, we have shown that this scheme is able to correctly reproduce the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) up to $z\sim3$. We contrast model predictions with both rest-frame Ultra-Violet (UV) and optical luminosity functions (LF), which are mostly sensible to the SFR and stellar mass, respectively. We show that GAEA is able to reproduce the shape and redshift evolution of both sets of LFs. We study the impact of dust on the predicted LFs and we find that the required level of dust attenuation is in qualitative agreement with recent estimates based on the UV continuum slope. The consistency between data and model predictions holds for the redshift evolution of the physical quantities well beyond the redshift range considered for the calibration of the original model. In particular, we show that GAEA is able to recover the evolution of the GSMF up to z$\sim$7 and the cosmic SFR density up to z$\sim$10.
  • We present a clustering comparison of 12 galaxy formation models (including Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs) and Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models) all run on halo catalogues and merger trees extracted from a single {\Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. We compare the results of the measurements of the mean halo occupation numbers, the radial distribution of galaxies in haloes and the 2-Point Correlation Functions (2PCF). We also study the implications of the different treatments of orphan (galaxies not assigned to any dark matter subhalo) and non-orphan galaxies in these measurements. Our main result is that the galaxy formation models generally agree in their clustering predictions but they disagree significantly between HOD and SAMs for the orphan satellites. Although there is a very good agreement between the models on the 2PCF of central galaxies, the scatter between the models when orphan satellites are included can be larger than a factor of 2 for scales smaller than 1 Mpc/h. We also show that galaxy formation models that do not include orphan satellite galaxies have a significantly lower 2PCF on small scales, consistent with previous studies. Finally, we show that the 2PCF of orphan satellites is remarkably different between SAMs and HOD models. Orphan satellites in SAMs present a higher clustering than in HOD models because they tend to occupy more massive haloes. We conclude that orphan satellites have an important role on galaxy clustering and they are the main cause of the differences in the clustering between HOD models and SAMs.
  • We take advantage of our recently published model for Galaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA) to study the origin of the observed correlation between [$\alpha$/Fe] and galaxy stellar mass. In particular, we analyse the role of radio mode AGN feedback, that recent work has identified as a crucial ingredient to reproduce observations. In GAEA, this process introduces the observed trend of star formation histories extending over shorter time-scales for more massive galaxies, but does not provide a sufficient condition to reproduce the observed $\alpha$ enhancements of massive galaxies. In the framework of our model, this is possible only assuming that any residual star formation is truncated for galaxies more massive than $10^{10.5}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$. This results, however, in even shorter star formation time-scales for the most massive galaxies, that translate in total stellar metallicities significantly lower than observed. Our results demonstrate that (i) trends of [$\alpha$/Fe] ratios cannot be simply converted in relative time-scale indicators, and (ii) AGN feedback cannot explain alone the positive correlation between [$\alpha$/Fe] and galaxy mass/velocity dispersion. Reproducing simultaneously the mass-metallicity relation and the $\alpha$ enhancements observed poses a challenge for hierarchical models, unless more exotic solutions are adopted such as metal-rich winds or a variable IMF.
  • In this work, we study the basic statistical properties of HI-selected galaxies extracted from six different semi-analytic models, all run on the same cosmological N-body simulation. One model includes an explicit treatment for the partition of cold gas into atomic and molecular hydrogen. All models considered agree nicely with the measured HI mass function in the local Universe, with the measured scaling relations between HI and galaxy stellar mass, and with the predicted 2-point correlation function for HI rich galaxies. One exception is given by one model that predicts very little HI associated with galaxies in haloes above 10^12 Msun: we argue this is due to a too efficient radio-mode feedback for central galaxies, and to a combination of efficient stellar feedback and instantaneous stripping of hot gas for satellites. We demonstrate that treatment of satellite galaxies introduces large uncertainties at low HI masses. While models assuming non instantaneous stripping of hot gas tend to form satellite galaxies with HI masses slightly smaller than those of centrals with the same stellar mass, instantaneous gas stripping does not translate necessarily in lower HI masses. In fact, the adopted stellar feedback and star formation affect the satellites too. We analyze the relation between HI content and spin of simulated haloes: low spin haloes tend to host HI poor galaxies while high spin haloes are populated by galaxies in a wide range of HI mass. In our simulations, this is due to a correlation between the initial gas disk size and the halo spin.
  • One major problem of current theoretical models of galaxy formation is given by their inability to reproduce the apparently `anti-hierarchical' evolution of galaxy assembly: massive galaxies appear to be in place since $z\sim 3$, while a significant increase of the number densities of low mass galaxies is measured with decreasing redshift. In this work, we perform a systematic analysis of the influence of different stellar feedback schemes, carried out in the framework of GAEA, a new semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. It includes a self-consistent treatment for the timings of gas, metal and energy recycling, and for the chemical yields. We show this to be crucial to use observational measurements of the metallicity as independent and powerful constraints for the adopted feedback schemes. The observed trends can be reproduced in the framework of either a strong ejective or preventive feedback model. In the former case, the gas ejection rate must decrease significantly with cosmic time (as suggested by parametrizations of the cosmological `FIRE' simulations). Irrespective of the feedback scheme used, our successful models always imply that up to 60-70 per cent of the baryons reside in an `ejected' reservoir and are unavailable for cooling at high redshift. The same schemes predict physical properties of model galaxies (e.g. gas content, colour, age, and metallicity) that are in much better agreement with observational data than our fiducial model. The overall fraction of passive galaxies is found to be primarily determined by internal physical processes, with environment playing a secondary role.
  • We present a detailed study of the colours in late-type galaxy discs for ten of the EDisCS galaxy clusters with 0.5 < z < 0.8. Our cluster sample contains 172 spiral galaxies, and our control sample is composed of 96 field disc galaxies. We deconvolve their ground-based V and I images obtained with FORS2 at the VLT with initial spatial resolutions between 0.4 and 0.8 arcsec to achieve a final resolution of 0.1 arcsec with 0.05 arcsec pixels, which is close to the resolution of the ACS at the HST. After removing the central region of each galaxy to avoid pollution by the bulges, we measured the V-I colours of the discs. We find that 50% of cluster spiral galaxies have disc V-I colours redder by more than 1 sigma of the mean colours of their field counterparts. This is well above the 16% expected for a normal distribution centred on the field disc properties. The prominence of galaxies with red discs depends neither on the mass of their parent cluster nor on the distance of the galaxies to the cluster cores. Passive spiral galaxies constitute 20% of our sample. These systems are not abnormally dusty. They are are made of old stars and are located on the cluster red sequences. Another 24% of our sample is composed of galaxies that are still active and star forming, but less so than galaxies with similar morphologies in the field. These galaxies are naturally located in the blue sequence of their parent cluster colour-magnitude diagrams. The reddest of the discs in clusters must have stopped forming stars more than ~5 Gyr ago. Some of them are found among infalling galaxies, suggesting preprocessing. Our results confirm that galaxies are able to continue forming stars for some significant period of time after being accreted into clusters, and suggest that star formation can decline on seemingly long (1 to 5 Gyr) timescales.
  • The growth of galaxies is a key problem in understanding the structure and evolution of the universe. Galaxies grow their stellar mass by a combination of star formation and mergers, with a relative importance that is redshift dependent. Theoretical models predict quantitatively different contributions from the two channels; measuring these from the data is a crucial constraint. Exploiting the UltraVISTA catalog and a unique sample of progenitors of local ultra massive galaxies selected with an abundance matching approach, we quantify the role of the two mechanisms from z=2 to 0. We also compare our results to two independent incarnations of semi-analytic models. At all redshifts, progenitors are found in a variety of environments, ranging from being isolated to having 5-10 companions with mass ratio at least 1:10 within a projected radius of 500 kpc. In models, progenitors have a systematically larger number of companions, entailing a larger mass growth for mergers than in observations, at all redshifts. Generally, in both observations and models, the inferred and the expected mass growth roughly agree, within the uncertainties. Overall, our analysis confirms the model predictions, showing how the growth history of massive galaxies is dominated by in situ star formation at z~2, both star-formation and mergers at 1<z<2, and by mergers alone at z<1. Nonetheless, detailed comparisons still point out to tensions between the expected mass growth and our results, which might be due to either an incorrect progenitors-descendants selection, uncertainties on star formation rate and mass estimates, or the adopted assumptions on merger rates.
  • We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investigate a common approach to model calibration. This paper provides a unified description for all participating models and presents the initial, uncalibrated comparison as a baseline for our future studies where we will develop a common calibration framework and address the extent to which that reduces the scatter in the model predictions seen here.
  • In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass--size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the $0.4 < z < 0.8$ redshift range from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) using HST images. We analyse two mass-selected samples, one defined using photometric redshifts ($10.2 \le \log M_\ast/M_{\odot} \le 12.0$), and a smaller more robust subsample using spectroscopic redshifts ($10.6 \le \log M_\ast/M_{\odot} \le 11.8$). We find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of a given morphology. Similarly, we find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of similar rest-frame $B-V$ colours. We rule out average size differences larger than $10$--$20$\% in both cases. Consistent conclusions are found with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. These results have important consequences for the physical process(es) responsible for the size evolution of galaxies, and in particular the effect of the environment. The remarkable growth in galaxy size observed from $z\sim2.5$ has been reported to depend on the environment at higher redshifts ($z>1$), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-$z$ is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by $z\sim1$. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.
  • We compute and study the infrared and sub-mm properties of high redshift ($z \gtrsim 1$) simulated clusters and proto-clusters. The results of a large set of hydro-dynamical zoom-in simulations including active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, have been treated with the recently developed radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D, which accounts for the effect of dust reprocessing in an arbitrary geometry. Here, we have slightly generalized the code to adapt it to the present purpose. Then we have post-processed boxes of physical size 2 Mpc encompassing each of the 24 most massive clusters identified at z=0, at several redshifts between 0.5 and 3, producing IR and sub-mm mock images of these regions and SEDs of the radiation coming out from them. While this field is in its infancy from the observational point of view, rapid development is expected in the near future thanks to observations performed in the far IR and sub-mm bands. Notably, we find that in this spectral regime our prediction are little affected by the assumption required by this post-processing, and the emission is mostly powered by star formation rather than accretion onto super massive black hole (SMBH). The comparison with the little observational information currently available, highlights that the simulated cluster regions never attain the impressive star formation rates suggested by these observations. This problem becomes more intriguing taking into account that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the same simulations turn out to be too massive. It seems that the interplay between the feedback schemes and the star formation model should be revised, possibly incorporating a positive feedback mode.
  • A well calibrated method to describe the environment of galaxies at all redshifts is essential for the study of structure formation. Such a calibration should include well understood correlations with halo mass, and the possibility to identify galaxies which dominate their potential well (centrals), and their satellites. Focusing on z = 1 and 2 we propose a method of environmental calibration which can be applied to the next generation of low to medium resolution spectroscopic surveys. Using an up-to-date semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we measure the local density of galaxies in fixed apertures on different scales. There is a clear correlation of density with halo mass for satellite galaxies, while a significant population of low mass centrals is found at high densities in the neighbourhood of massive haloes. In this case the density simply traces the mass of the most massive halo within the aperture. To identify central and satellite galaxies, we apply an observationally motivated stellar mass rank method which is both highly pure and complete, especially in the more massive haloes where such a division is most meaningful. Finally we examine a test case for the recovery of environmental trends: the passive fraction of galaxies and its dependence on stellar and halo mass for centrals and satellites. With careful calibration, observationally defined quantities do a good job of recovering known trends in the model. This result stands even with reduced redshift accuracy, provided the sample is deep enough to preserve a wide dynamic range of density.
  • We develop a new method to account for the finite lifetimes of stars and trace individual abundances within a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. At variance with previous methods, based on the storage of the (binned) past star formation history of model galaxies, our method projects the information about the metals produced by each simple stellar population (SSP) in the future. Using this approach, an accurate accounting of the timings and properties of the individual SSPs composing model galaxies is possible. We analyse the dependence of our chemical model on various ingredients, and apply it to six simulated haloes of roughly Milky Way mass and with no massive close neighbour at z=0. For all models considered, the [Fe/H] distributions of the stars in the disc component are in good agreement with Milky Way data, while for the spheroid component (whose formation we model only through mergers) these are offset low with respect to observational measurements for the Milky Way bulge. This is a consequence of narrow star formation histories, with relatively low rates of star formation. The slow recycling of gas and energy from supernovae in our chemical model has important consequences on the predicted star formation rates, which are systematically lower than the corresponding rates in the same physical model but with an instantaneous recycling approximation. The halo that resembles most our Galaxy in terms of its global properties also reproduces the observed relation between the average metallicity and luminosity of the Milky Way satellites, albeit with a slightly steeper slope.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the influence of the environment and of the environmental history on quenching star formation in central and satellite galaxies in the local Universe. We take advantage of publicly available galaxy catalogues obtained from applying a galaxy formation model to the Millennium simulation. In addition to halo mass, we consider the local density of galaxies within various fixed scales. Comparing our model predictions to observational data (SDSS), we demonstrate that the models are failing to reproduce the observed density dependence of the quiescent galaxy fraction in several aspects: for most of the stellar mass ranges and densities explored, models cannot reproduce the observed similar behaviour of centrals and satellites, they slightly under-estimate the quiescent fraction of centrals and significantly over-estimate that of satellites. We show that in the models, the density dependence of the quiescent central galaxies is caused by a fraction of "backsplash" centrals which have been satellites in the past (and were thus suffering from environmental processes). Turning to satellite galaxies, the density dependence of their quiescent fractions reflects a dependence on the time spent orbiting within a parent halo of a particular mass, correlating strongly with halo mass and distance from the halo centre. Comparisons with observational estimates suggest relatively long gas consumption time scales of roughly 5 Gyr in low mass satellite galaxies. The quenching time scales decrease with increasing satellite stellar mass. Overall, a change in modelling both internal processes (star formation and feedback) and environmental processes (e.g. making them dependent on dynamical friction time-scales and preventing the re-accretion of gas onto backsplash galaxies) is required for improving currently used galaxy formation models.
  • In April 2013, a workshop entitled "What Regulates Galaxy Evolution" was held at the Lorentz Center. The aim of the workshop was to bring together the observational and theoretical community working on galaxy evolution, and to discuss in depth of the current problems in the subject, as well as to review the most recent observational constraints. A total of 42 astrophysicists attended the workshop. A significant fraction of the time was devoted to identifying the most interesting "open questions" in the field, and to discuss how progress can be made. This review discusses the four questions (one for each day of the workshop) that, in our opinion, were the focus of the most intense debate. We present each question in its context, and close with a discussion of what future directions should be pursued in order to make progress on these problems.
  • We study the evolution of disc galaxies in group environments under the effect of both the global tidal field and close-encounters between galaxies, using controlled N-body simulations of isolated mergers. We find that close-range encounters between galaxies are less frequent and less damaging to disc galaxies than originally expected, since they mostly occur when group members have lost a significant fraction of their initial mass to tidal stripping. We also find that group members mostly affect disc galaxies indirectly by modifying their common global tidal field. Different initial orbital parameters of group members introduce a significant "scatter" in the evolution of general properties of disc galaxies around a "median" evolution that is similar to when only the effect of the global tidal field is included. Close-encounters introduce a high variability in the properties of disc galaxies, even slowing their evolution in some cases, and could wash out correlations between galaxy properties and the group total mass. The combined effect of the global tidal field and close-encounters appears to be inefficient at forming/enhancing central stellar bulges. This implies that bulges of S0 galaxies should be mostly composed by young stars, which is consistent with recent observations.
  • Assembly bias describes the finding that the clustering of dark matter haloes depends on halo formation time at fixed halo mass. In this paper, we analyse the influence of assembly bias on galaxy clustering using both semi-analytical models (SAMs) and observational data. At fixed stellar mass, SAMs predict that the clustering of {\it central} galaxies depends on the specific star formation rate (sSFR), with more passive galaxies having a higher clustering amplitude. We find similar trends using SDSS group catalogues, and verify that these are not affected by possible biases due to the group finding algorithm. Low mass central galaxies reside in narrow bins of halo mass, so the observed trends of higher clustering amplitude for galaxies with lower sSFR is not driven by variations of the parent halo mass. We argue that the clustering dependence on sSFR represent a direct detection of assembly bias. In addition, contrary to what expected based on clustering of dark matter haloes, we find that low-mass central galaxies in SAMs with larger host halo mass have a {\it lower} clustering amplitude than their counter-parts residing in lower mass haloes. This results from the fact that, at fixed stellar mass, assembly bias has a stronger influence on clustering than the dependence on the parent halo mass.
  • The empirical HOD model of Wang et al. 2006 fits, by construction, both the stellar mass function and correlation function of galaxies in the local Universe. In contrast, the semi-analytical models of De Lucia & Blazoit 2007 (DLB07) and Guo et al. 2011 (Guo11), built on the same dark matter halo merger trees than the empirical model, still have difficulties in reproducing these observational data simultaneously. We compare the relations between the stellar mass of galaxies and their host halo mass in the three models, and find that they are different. When the relations are rescaled to have the same median values and the same scatter as in Wang et al., the rescaled DLB07 model can fit both the measured galaxy stellar mass function and the correlation function measured in different galaxy stellar mass bins. In contrast, the rescaled Guo11 model still over-predicts the clustering of low-mass galaxies. This indicates that the detail of how galaxies populate the scatter in the stellar mass -- halo mass relation does play an important role in determining the correlation functions of galaxies. While the stellar mass of galaxies in the Wang et al. model depends only on halo mass and is randomly distributed within the scatter, galaxy stellar mass depends also on the halo formation time in semi-analytical models. At fixed value of infall mass, galaxies that lie above the median stellar mass -- halo mass relation reside in haloes that formed earlier, while galaxies that lie below the median relation reside in haloes that formed later. This effect is much stronger in Guo11 than in DLB07, which explains the over-clustering of low mass galaxies in Guo11. Our results illustrate that the assumption of random scatter in the relation between stellar and halo mass as employed by current HOD and abundance matching models may be problematic in case a significant assembly bias exists in the real Universe.
  • In this study, we have carried out a detailed, statistical analysis of isolated model galaxies, taking advantage of publicly available hierarchical galaxy formation models. To select isolated galaxies, we employ 2D methods widely used in the observational literature, as well as a more stringent 3D isolation criterion that uses the full 3D-real space information. In qualitative agreement with observational results, isolated model galaxies have larger fractions of late-type, star forming galaxies with respect to randomly selected samples of galaxies with the same mass distribution. We also find that the samples of isolated model galaxies typically contain a fraction of less than 15 per cent of satellite galaxies, that reside at the outskirts of their parent haloes where the galaxy number density is low. Projection effects cause a contamination of 2D samples of about 18 per cent, while we estimate a typical completeness of 65 per cent. Our model isolated samples also include a very small (few per cent) fraction of bulge dominated galaxies (B/T > 0.8) whose bulges have been built mainly by minor mergers. Our study demonstrates that about 65-70 per cent of 2D isolated galaxies that are classified as isolated at z = 0 have indeed been completely isolated since z = 1 and only 7 per cent have had more than 3 neighbours within a comoving radius of 1 Mpc. Irrespectively of the isolation criteria, roughly 45 per cent of isolated galaxies have experienced at least one merger event in the past (most of the mergers are minor, with mass ratios between 1:4 and 1:10). The latter point validates the approximation that isolated galaxies have been mainly influenced by internal processes.
  • We compare three analytical prescriptions for merger times available from the literature to simulations of isolated mergers. We probe three different redshifts, and several halo concentrations, mass ratios, orbital circularities and orbital energies of the satellite. We find that prescriptions available in the literature significantly under-predict long timescales for mergers at high redshift. We argue that these results have not been highlighted previously either because the evolution of halo concentration of satellite galaxies has been neglected (in previous isolated merger simulations), or because long merger times and mergers with high initial orbital circularities are under-represented (for prescriptions based on cosmological simulations). Motivated by the evolution of halo concentration at fixed mass, an explicit dependence on redshift added as t_merger,modified(z) = (1+z)^0.44 t_merger to the prescription based on isolated mergers gives a significant improvement in the predicted merger times up to ~20 t_dyn in the redshift range 0<z<2. When this modified prescription is used to compute galaxy stellar mass functions, we find that it leads up to a 25 per cent increase in the number of low mass galaxies surviving at z=0, and a 10 per cent increase for more massive galaxies. This worsen the known over-prediction in the number of low mass galaxies by hierarchical models of galaxy formation.
  • We present the analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function in different environments at intermediate redshift (0.3<z<0.8) for two mass-limited galaxy samples. We use the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS), at masses M_ast >10^(10.5) M_sun, to study cluster, group, and field galaxies at z=0.3-0.45, and the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), at masses M_ast > 10^(10.2) M_sun, to investigate cluster and group galaxies at z=0.4-0.8. Therefore, in our analysis we include galaxies that are slightly less massive than the Milky Way. Having excluded the brightest cluster galaxies, we show thatthe shape of the mass distribution does not seem to depend on global environment. Our two main results are: (1) Galaxies in the virialized regions of clusters, in groups, and in the field follow a similar mass distribution. (2) Comparing both ICBS and EDisCS mass functions to mass functions in the local Universe, we find evolution from z~0.4-0.6 to z~0.07. The population of low-mass galaxies has proportionally grown with time with respect to that of massive galaxies. This evolution is independent of environment -- the same for clusters and the field. Furthermore, considering only clusters, we find that no differences can be detected neither within the virialized regions, nor when we compare galaxies within and outside the virial radius. Subdividing galaxies in terms of color, in clusters, groups, and field red and blue galaxies are regulated by different mass functions, but comparing separately the blue and red mass functions in different environments, no differences are detected in their shape.
  • We combine the six high-resolution Aquarius dark matter simulations with a semi-analytic galaxy formation model to investigate the properties of the satellites of Milky Way-like galaxies. We find good correspondence with the observed luminosity function, luminosity-metallicity relation and radial distribution of the Milky Way satellites. The star formation histories of the dwarf galaxies in our model vary widely, in accordance with what is seen observationally. Ram-pressure stripping of hot gas from the satellites leaves a clear imprint of the environment on the characteristics of a dwarf galaxy. We find that the fraction of satellites dominated by old populations of stars matches observations well. However, the internal metallicity distributions of the model satellites appear to be narrower than observed. This may indicate limitations in our treatment of chemical enrichment, which is based on the instantaneous recycling approximation. Our model works best if the dark matter halo of the Milky Way has a mass of ~8 x 10^11 Msun, in agreement with the lower estimates from observations. The galaxy that resembles the Milky Way the most also has the best matching satellite luminosity function, although it does not contain an object as bright as the SMC or LMC. Compared to other semi-analytic models and abundance matching relations we find that central galaxies reside in less massive haloes, but the halo mass-stellar mass relation in our model is consistent both with hydrodynamical simulations and with recent observations.