• We address the two fundamental problems of spatial field reconstruction and sensor selection in het- erogeneous sensor networks. We consider the case where two types of sensors are deployed: the first consists of expensive, high quality sensors; and the second, of cheap low quality sensors, which are activated only if the intensity of the spatial field exceeds a pre-defined activation threshold (eg. wind sensors). In addition, these sensors are powered by means of energy harvesting and their time varying energy status impacts on the accuracy of the measurement that may be obtained. We account for this phenomenon by encoding the energy harvesting process into the second moment properties of the additive noise, resulting in a spatial heteroscedastic process. We then address the following two important problems: (i) how to efficiently perform spatial field reconstruction based on measurements obtained simultaneously from both networks; and (ii) how to perform query based sensor set selection with predictive MSE performance guarantee. We first show that the resulting predictive posterior distribution, which is key in fusing such disparate observations, involves solving intractable integrals. To overcome this problem, we solve the first problem by developing a low complexity algorithm based on the spatial best linear unbiased estimator (S-BLUE). Next, building on the S-BLUE, we address the second problem, and develop an efficient algorithm for query based sensor set selection with performance guarantee. Our algorithm is based on the Cross Entropy method which solves the combinatorial optimization problem in an efficient manner. We present a comprehensive study of the performance gain that can be obtained by augmenting the high-quality sensors with low-quality sensors using both synthetic and real insurance storm surge database known as the Extreme Wind Storms Catalogue.
  • We offer a novel way of thinking about the modelling of the time-varying distributions of financial asset returns. Borrowing ideas from symbolic data analysis, we consider data representations beyond scalars and vectors. Specifically, we consider a quantile function as an observation, and develop a new class of dynamic models for quantile-function-valued (QF-valued) time series. In order to make statistical inferences and account for parameter uncertainty, we propose a method whereby a likelihood function can be constructed for QF-valued data, and develop an adaptive MCMC sampling algorithm for simulating from the posterior distribution. Compared to modelling realised measures, modelling the entire quantile functions of intra-daily returns allows one to gain more insight into the dynamic structure of price movements. Via simulations, we show that the proposed MCMC algorithm is effective in recovering the posterior distribution, and that the posterior means are reasonable point estimates of the model parameters. For empirical studies, the new model is applied to analysing one-minute returns of major international stock indices. Through quantile scaling, we further demonstrate the usefulness of our method by forecasting one-step-ahead the Value-at-Risk of daily returns.
  • Cohort effects are important factors in determining the evolution of human mortality for certain countries. Extensions of dynamic mortality models with cohort features have been proposed in the literature to account for these factors under the generalised linear modelling framework. In this paper we approach the problem of mortality modelling with cohort factors incorporated through a novel formulation under a state-space methodology. In the process we demonstrate that cohort factors can be formulated naturally under the state-space framework, despite the fact that cohort factors are indexed according to year-of-birth rather than year. Bayesian inference for cohort models in a state-space formulation is then developed based on an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler, allowing for the quantification of parameter uncertainty in cohort models and resulting mortality forecasts that are used for life expectancy and life table constructions. The effectiveness of our approach is examined through comprehensive empirical studies involving male and female populations from various countries. Our results show that cohort patterns are present for certain countries that we studied and the inclusion of cohort factors are crucial in capturing these phenomena, thus highlighting the benefits of introducing cohort models in the state-space framework. Forecasting of cohort models is also discussed in light of the projection of cohort factors.
  • Recently, Basel Committee for Banking Supervision proposed to replace all approaches, including Advanced Measurement Approach (AMA), for operational risk capital with a simple formula referred to as the Standardised Measurement Approach (SMA). This paper discusses and studies the weaknesses and pitfalls of SMA such as instability, risk insensitivity, super-additivity and the implicit relationship between SMA capital model and systemic risk in the banking sector. We also discuss the issues with closely related operational risk Capital-at-Risk (OpCar) Basel Committee proposed model which is the precursor to the SMA. In conclusion, we advocate to maintain the AMA internal model framework and suggest as an alternative a number of standardization recommendations that could be considered to unify internal modelling of operational risk. The findings and views presented in this paper have been discussed with and supported by many OpRisk practitioners and academics in Australia, Europe, UK and USA, and recently at OpRisk Europe 2016 conference in London.
  • This paper explores and develops alternative statistical representations and estimation approaches for dynamic mortality models. The framework we adopt is to reinterpret popular mortality models such as the Lee-Carter class of models in a general state-space modelling methodology, which allows modelling, estimation and forecasting of mortality under a unified framework. Furthermore, we propose an alternative class of model identification constraints which is more suited to statistical inference in filtering and parameter estimation settings based on maximization of the marginalized likelihood or in Bayesian inference. We then develop a novel class of Bayesian state-space models which incorporate apriori beliefs about the mortality model characteristics as well as for more flexible and appropriate assumptions relating to heteroscedasticity that present in observed mortality data. We show that multiple period and cohort effect can be cast under a state-space structure. To study long term mortality dynamics, we introduce stochastic volatility to the period effect. The estimation of the resulting stochastic volatility model of mortality is performed using a recent class of Monte Carlo procedure specifically designed for state and parameter estimation in Bayesian state-space models, known as the class of particle Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrate the framework we have developed using Danish male mortality data, and show that incorporating heteroscedasticity and stochastic volatility markedly improves model fit despite an increase of model complexity. Forecasting properties of the enhanced models are examined with long term and short term calibration periods on the reconstruction of life tables.
  • This paper discusses different classes of loss models in non-life insurance settings. It then overviews the class Tukey transform loss models that have not yet been widely considered in non-life insurance modelling, but offer opportunities to produce flexible skewness and kurtosis features often required in loss modelling. In addition, these loss models admit explicit quantile specifications which make them directly relevant for quantile based risk measure calculations. We detail various parameterizations and sub-families of the Tukey transform based models, such as the g-and-h, g-and-k and g-and-j models, including their properties of relevance to loss modelling. One of the challenges with such models is to perform robust estimation for the loss model parameters that will be amenable to practitioners when fitting such models. In this paper we develop a novel, efficient and robust estimation procedure for estimation of model parameters in this family Tukey transform models, based on L-moments. It is shown to be more robust and efficient than current state of the art methods of estimation for such families of loss models and is simple to implement for practical purposes.
  • Nonlinear non-Gaussian state-space models arise in numerous applications in statistics and signal processing. In this context, one of the most successful and popular approximation techniques is the Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm, also known as particle filtering. Nevertheless, this method tends to be inefficient when applied to high dimensional problems. In this paper, we focus on another class of sequential inference methods, namely the Sequential Markov Chain Monte Carlo (SMCMC) techniques, which represent a promising alternative to SMC methods. After providing a unifying framework for the class of SMCMC approaches, we propose novel efficient strategies based on the principle of Langevin diffusion and Hamiltonian dynamics in order to cope with the increasing number of high-dimensional applications. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithms achieve significantly better performance compared to existing algorithms.
  • Real-time urban climate monitoring provides useful information that can be utilized to help monitor and adapt to extreme events, including urban heatwaves. Typical approaches to the monitoring of climate data include weather station monitoring and remote sensing. However, climate monitoring stations are very often distributed spatially in a sparse manner, and consequently, this has a significant impact on the ability to reveal exposure risks due to extreme climates at an intra-urban scale. Additionally, traditional remote sensing data sources are typically not received and analyzed in real-time which is often required for adaptive urban management of climate extremes, such as sudden heatwaves. Fortunately, recent social media, such as Twitter, furnishes real-time and high-resolution spatial information that might be useful for climate condition estimation. The objective of this study is utilizing geo-tagged tweets (participatory sensing data) for urban temperature analysis. We first detect tweets relating hotness (hot-tweets). Then, we study relationships between monitored temperatures and hot-tweets via a statistical model framework based on copula modelling methods. We demonstrate that there are strong relationships between "hot-tweets" and temperatures recorded at an intra-urban scale. Subsequently, we then investigate the application of "hot-tweets" informing spatio-temporal Gaussian process interpolation of temperatures as an application example of "hot-tweets". We utilize a combination of spatially sparse weather monitoring sensor data and spatially and temporally dense lower quality twitter data. Here, a spatial best linear unbiased estimation technique is applied. The result suggests that tweets provide some useful auxiliary information for urban climate assessment. Lastly, effectiveness of tweets toward a real-time urban risk management is discussed based on the results.
  • Financial exchanges provide incentives for limit order book (LOB) liquidity provision to certain market participants, termed designated market makers or designated sponsors. While quoting requirements typically enforce the activity of these participants for a certain portion of the day, we argue that liquidity demand throughout the trading day is far from uniformly distributed, and thus this liquidity provision may not be calibrated to the demand. We propose that quoting obligations also include requirements about the speed of liquidity replenishment, and we recommend use of the Threshold Exceedance Duration (TED) for this purpose. We present a comprehensive regression modelling approach using GLM and GAMLSS models to relate the TED to the state of the LOB and identify the regression structures that are best suited to modelling the TED. Such an approach can be used by exchanges to set target levels of liquidity replenishment for designated market makers.
  • The internet era has generated a requirement for low cost, anonymous and rapidly verifiable transactions to be used for online barter, and fast settling money have emerged as a consequence. For the most part, e-money has fulfilled this role, but the last few years have seen two new types of money emerge. Centralised virtual currencies, usually for the purpose of transacting in social and gaming economies, and crypto-currencies, which aim to eliminate the need for financial intermediaries by offering direct peer-to-peer online payments. We describe the historical context which led to the development of these currencies and some modern and recent trends in their uptake, in terms of both usage in the real economy and as investment products. As these currencies are purely digital constructs, with no government or local authority backing, we then discuss them in the context of monetary theory, in order to determine how they may be have value under each. Finally, we provide an overview of the state of regulatory readiness in terms of dealing with transactions in these currencies in various regions of the world.
  • In this article we investigate a state-space representation of the Lee-Carter model which is a benchmark stochastic mortality model for forecasting age-specific death rates. Existing relevant literature focuses mainly on mortality forecasting or pricing of longevity derivatives, while the full implications and methods of using the state-space representation of the Lee-Carter model in pricing retirement income products is yet to be examined. The main contribution of this article is twofold. First, we provide a rigorous and detailed derivation of the posterior distributions of the parameters and the latent process of the Lee-Carter model via Gibbs sampling. Our assumption for priors is slightly more general than the current literature in this area. Moreover, we suggest a new form of identification constraint not yet utilised in the actuarial literature that proves to be a more convenient approach for estimating the model under the state-space framework. Second, by exploiting the posterior distribution of the latent process and parameters, we examine the pricing range of annuities, taking into account the stochastic nature of the dynamics of the mortality rates. In this way we aim to capture the impact of longevity risk on the pricing of annuities. The outcome of our study demonstrates that an annuity price can be more than 4% under-valued when different assumptions are made on determining the survival curve constructed from the distribution of the forecasted death rates. Given that a typical annuity portfolio consists of a large number of policies with maturities which span decades, we conclude that the impact of longevity risk on the accurate pricing of annuities is a significant issue to be further researched. In addition, we find that mis-pricing is increasingly more pronounced for older ages as well as for annuity policies having a longer maturity.
  • With the rise of cheap small-cells in wireless cellular networks, there are new opportunities for third party providers to service local regions via sharing arrangements with traditional operators. In fact, such arrangements are highly desirable for large facilities---such as stadiums, universities, and mines---as they already need to cover property costs, and often have fibre backhaul and efficient power infrastructure. In this paper, we propose a new network sharing arrangement between large facilities and traditional operators. Our facility network sharing arrangement consists of two aspects: leasing of core network access and spectrum from traditional operators; and service agreements with users. Importantly, our incorporation of a user service agreement into the arrangement means that resource allocation must account for financial as well as physical resource constraints. This introduces a new non-trivial dimension into wireless network resource allocation, which requires a new evaluation framework---the data rate is no longer the only main performance metric. Moreover, despite clear economic incentives to adopt network sharing for facilities, a business case is lacking. As such, we develop a general socio-technical evaluation framework based on ruin-theory, where the key metric for the sharing arrangement is the probability that the facility has less than zero revenue surplus. We then use our framework to evaluate our facility network sharing arrangement, which offers guidance for leasing and service agreement negotiations, as well as design of the wireless network architecture, taking into account network revenue streams.
  • In many problems, complex non-Gaussian and/or nonlinear models are required to accurately describe a physical system of interest. In such cases, Monte Carlo algorithms are remarkably flexible and extremely powerful approaches to solve such inference problems. However, in the presence of a high-dimensional and/or multimodal posterior distribution, it is widely documented that standard Monte-Carlo techniques could lead to poor performance. In this paper, the study is focused on a Sequential Monte-Carlo (SMC) sampler framework, a more robust and efficient Monte Carlo algorithm. Although this approach presents many advantages over traditional Monte-Carlo methods, the potential of this emergent technique is however largely underexploited in signal processing. In this work, we aim at proposing some novel strategies that will improve the efficiency and facilitate practical implementation of the SMC sampler specifically for signal processing applications. Firstly, we propose an automatic and adaptive strategy that selects the sequence of distributions within the SMC sampler that minimizes the asymptotic variance of the estimator of the posterior normalization constant. This is critical for performing model selection in modelling applications in Bayesian signal processing. The second original contribution we present improves the global efficiency of the SMC sampler by introducing a novel correction mechanism that allows the use of the particles generated through all the iterations of the algorithm (instead of only particles from the last iteration). This is a significant contribution as it removes the need to discard a large portion of the samples obtained, as is standard in standard SMC methods. This will improve estimation performance in practical settings where computational budget is important to consider.
  • In this paper we consider classes of models that have been recently developed for quantitative finance that involve modelling a highly complex multivariate, multi-attribute stochastic process known as the Limit Order Book (LOB). The LOB is the primary data structure recorded each day intra-daily for all assets on every electronic exchange in the world in which trading takes place. As such, it represents one of the most important fundamental structures to study from a stochastic process perspective if one wishes to characterize features of stochastic dynamics for price, volume, liquidity and other important attributes for a traded asset. In this paper we aim to adopt the model structure which develops a stochastic model framework for the LOB of a given asset and to explain how to perform calibration of this stochastic model to real observed LOB data for a range of different assets.
  • In this paper we address the challenging problem of multiple source localization in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). We develop an efficient statistical algorithm, based on the novel application of Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler methodology, that is able to deal with an unknown number of sources given quantized data obtained at the fusion center from different sensors with imperfect wireless channels. We also derive the Posterior Cram\'er-Rao Bound (PCRB) of the source location estimate. The PCRB is used to analyze the accuracy of the proposed SMC sampler algorithm and the impact that quantization has on the accuracy of location estimates of the sources. Extensive experiments show that the benefits of the proposed scheme in terms of the accuracy of the estimation method that are required for model selection (i.e., the number of sources) and the estimation of the source characteristics compared to the classical importance sampling method.
  • This paper poses a few fundamental questions regarding the attributes of the volume profile of a Limit Order Books stochastic structure by taking into consideration aspects of intraday and interday statistical features, the impact of different exchange features and the impact of market participants in different asset sectors. This paper aims to address the following questions: 1. Is there statistical evidence that heavy-tailed sub-exponential volume profiles occur at different levels of the Limit Order Book on the bid and ask and if so does this happen on intra or interday time scales ? 2.In futures exchanges, are heavy tail features exchange (CBOT, CME, EUREX, SGX and COMEX) or asset class (government bonds, equities and precious metals) dependent and do they happen on ultra-high (<1sec) or mid-range (1sec -10min) high frequency data? 3.Does the presence of stochastic heavy-tailed volume profile features evolve in a manner that would inform or be indicative of market participant behaviors, such as high frequency algorithmic trading, quote stuffing and price discovery intra-daily? 4. Is there statistical evidence for a need to consider dynamic behavior of the parameters of models for Limit Order Book volume profiles on an intra-daily time scale ? Progress on aspects of each question is obtained via statistically rigorous results to verify the empirical findings for an unprecedentedly large set of futures market LOB data. The data comprises several exchanges, several futures asset classes and all trading days of 2010, using market depth (Type II) order book data to 5 levels on the bid and ask.
  • We investigate aspects of semimartingale decompositions, approximation and the martingale representation for multidimensional correlated Markov processes. A new interpretation of the dependence among processes is given using the martingale approach. We show that it is possible to represent, in both continuous and discrete space, that a multidimensional correlated generalized diffusion is a linear combination of processes that originate from the decomposition of the starting multidimensional semimartingale. This result not only reconciles with the existing theory of diffusion approximations and decompositions, but defines the general representation of infinitesimal generators for both multidimensional generalized diffusions and as we will demonstrate also for the specification of copula density dependence structures. This new result provides immediate representation of the approximate solution for correlated stochastic differential equations. We demonstrate desirable convergence results for the proposed multidimensional semimartingales decomposition approximations.
  • In this paper we assume a multivariate risk model has been developed for a portfolio and its capital derived as a homogeneous risk measure. The Euler (or gradient) principle, then, states that the capital to be allocated to each component of the portfolio has to be calculated as an expectation conditional to a rare event, which can be challenging to evaluate in practice. We exploit the copula-dependence within the portfolio risks to design a Sequential Monte Carlo Samplers based estimate to the marginal conditional expectations involved in the problem, showing its efficiency through a series of computational examples.
  • In this work we propose and examine Location Verification Systems (LVSs) for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) in the realistic setting of Rician fading channels. In our LVSs, a single authorized Base Station (BS) equipped with multiple antennas aims to detect a malicious vehicle that is spoofing its claimed location. We first determine the optimal attack strategy of the malicious vehicle, which in turn allows us to analyze the optimal LVS performance as a function of the Rician $K$-factor of the channel between the BS and a legitimate vehicle. Our analysis also allows us to formally prove that the LVS performance limit is independent of the properties of the channel between the BS and the malicious vehicle, provided the malicious vehicle's antenna number is above a specified value. We also investigate how tracking information on a vehicle quantitatively improves the detection performance of an LVS, showing how optimal performance is obtained under the assumption of the tracking length being randomly selected. The work presented here can be readily extended to multiple BS scenarios, and therefore forms the foundation for all optimal location authentication schemes within the context of Rician fading channels. Our study closes important gaps in the current understanding of LVS performance within the context of VANETs, and will be of practical value to certificate revocation schemes within IEEE 1609.2.
  • In this work we examine the performance of a Location Spoofing Detection System (LSDS) for vehicular networks in the realistic setting of Rician fading channels. In the LSDS, an authorized Base Station (BS) equipped with multiple antennas utilizes channel observations to identify a malicious vehicle, also equipped with multiple antennas, that is spoofing its location. After deriving the optimal transmit power and the optimal directional beamformer of a potentially malicious vehicle, robust theoretical analysis and detailed simulations are conducted in order to determine the impact of key system parameters on the LSDS performance. Our analysis shows how LSDS performance increases as the Rician K-factor of the channel between the BS and legitimate vehicles increases, or as the number of antennas at the BS or legitimate vehicle increases. We also obtain the counter-intuitive result that the malicious vehicle's optimal number of antennas conditioned on its optimal directional beamformer is equal to the legitimate vehicle's number of antennas. The results we provide here are important for the verification of location information reported in IEEE 1609.2 safety messages.
  • The verification of the location information utilized in wireless communication networks is a subject of growing importance. In this work we formally analyze, for the first time, the performance of a wireless Location Verification System (LVS) under the realistic setting of spatially correlated shadowing. Our analysis illustrates that anticipated levels of correlated shadowing can lead to a dramatic performance improvement of a Received Signal Strength (RSS)-based LVS. We also analyze the performance of an LVS that utilizes Differential Received Signal Strength (DRSS), formally proving the rather counter-intuitive result that a DRSS-based LVS has identical performance to that of an RSS-based LVS, for all levels of correlated shadowing. Even more surprisingly, the identical performance of RSS and DRSS-based LVSs is found to hold even when the adversary does not optimize his true location. Only in the case where the adversary does not optimize all variables under her control, do we find the performance of an RSS-based LVS to be better than a DRSS-based LVS. The results reported here are important for a wide range of emerging wireless communication applications whose proper functioning depends on the authenticity of the location information reported by a transceiver.
  • We develop the first basic Operational Risk perspective on key risk management issues associated with the development of new forms of electronic currency in the real economy. In particular, we focus on understanding the development of new risks types and the evolution of current risk types as new components of financial institutions arise to cater for an increasing demand for electronic money, micro-payment systems, Virtual money and cryptographic (Crypto) currencies. In particular, this paper proposes a framework of risk identification and assessment applied to Virtual and Crypto currencies from a banking regulation perspective. In doing so, it addresses the topical issues of understanding important key Operational Risk vulnerabilities and exposure risk drivers under the framework of the Basel II/III banking regulation, specifically associated with Virtual and Crypto currencies. This is critical to consider should such alternative currencies continue to grow in utilisation to the point that they enter into the banking sector, through commercial banks and financial institutions who are beginning to contemplate their recognition in terms of deposits, transactions and exchangeability for fiat currencies. We highlight how some of the features of Virtual and Crypto currencies are important drivers of Operational Risk, posing both management and regulatory challenges that must start to be considered and addressed both by regulators, central banks and security exchanges. In this paper we focus purely on the Operational Risk perspective of banks operating in an environment where such electronic Virtual currencies are available. Some aspects of this discussion are directly relevant now, whilst others can be understood as discussions to raise awareness of issues in Operational Risk that will arise as Virtual currency start to interact more widely in the real economy.
  • Currency carry trade is the investment strategy that involves selling low interest rate currencies in order to purchase higher interest rate currencies, thus profiting from the interest rate differentials. This is a well known financial puzzle to explain, since assuming foreign exchange risk is uninhibited and the markets have rational risk-neutral investors, then one would not expect profits from such strategies. That is, according to uncovered interest rate parity (UIP), changes in the related exchange rates should offset the potential to profit from such interest rate differentials. However, it has been shown empirically, that investors can earn profits on average by borrowing in a country with a lower interest rate, exchanging for foreign currency, and investing in a foreign country with a higher interest rate, whilst allowing for any losses from exchanging back to their domestic currency at maturity. This paper explores the financial risk that trading strategies seeking to exploit a violation of the UIP condition are exposed to with respect to multivariate tail dependence present in both the funding and investment currency baskets. It will outline in what contexts these portfolio risk exposures will benefit accumulated portfolio returns and under what conditions such tail exposures will reduce portfolio returns.
  • We develop quantile regression models in order to derive risk margin and to evaluate capital in non-life insurance applications. By utilizing the entire range of conditional quantile functions, especially higher quantile levels, we detail how quantile regression is capable of providing an accurate estimation of risk margin and an overview of implied capital based on the historical volatility of a general insurers loss portfolio. Two modelling frameworks are considered based around parametric and nonparametric quantile regression models which we develop specifically in this insurance setting. In the parametric quantile regression framework, several models including the flexible generalized beta distribution family, asymmetric Laplace (AL) distribution and power Pareto distribution are considered under a Bayesian regression framework. The Bayesian posterior quantile regression models in each case are studied via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling strategies. In the nonparametric quantile regression framework, that we contrast to the parametric Bayesian models, we adopted an AL distribution as a proxy and together with the parametric AL model, we expressed the solution as a scale mixture of uniform distributions to facilitate implementation. The models are extended to adopt dynamic mean, variance and skewness and applied to analyze two real loss reserve data sets to perform inference and discuss interesting features of quantile regression for risk margin calculations.
  • The currency carry trade is the investment strategy that involves selling low interest rate currencies in order to purchase higher interest rate currencies, thus profiting from the interest rate differentials. This is a well known financial puzzle to explain, since assuming foreign exchange risk is uninhibited and the markets have rational risk-neutral investors, then one would not expect profits from such strategies. That is uncovered interest rate parity (UIP), the parity condition in which exposure to foreign exchange risk, with unanticipated changes in exchange rates, should result in an outcome that changes in the exchange rate should offset the potential to profit from such interest rate differentials. The two primary assumptions required for interest rate parity are related to capital mobility and perfect substitutability of domestic and foreign assets. Given foreign exchange market equilibrium, the interest rate parity condition implies that the expected return on domestic assets will equal the exchange rate-adjusted expected return on foreign currency assets. However, it has been shown empirically, that investors can actually earn arbitrage profits by borrowing in a country with a lower interest rate, exchanging for foreign currency, and investing in a foreign country with a higher interest rate, whilst allowing for any losses (or gains) from exchanging back to their domestic currency at maturity. Therefore trading strategies that aim to exploit the interest rate differentials can be profitable on average. The intention of this paper is therefore to reinterpret the currency carry trade puzzle in light of heavy tailed marginal models coupled with multivariate tail dependence features in the analysis of the risk-reward for the currency portfolios with high interest rate differentials and low interest rate differentials.