• The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) concept requires an optical coronagraph that provides deep starlight suppression over a broad spectral bandwidth, high throughput for point sources at small angular separation, and insensitivity to temporally-varying, low-order aberrations. Vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that perform optimally on off-axis, monolithic telescopes and may also be designed for segmented telescopes with minor losses in performance. We describe the key advantages of vortex coronagraphs on off-axis telescopes: 1) Unwanted diffraction due to aberrations is passively rejected in several low-order Zernike modes relaxing the wavefront stability requirements for imaging Earth-like planets from <10 to >100 pm rms. 2) Stars with angular diameters >0.1 $\lambda/D$ may be sufficiently suppressed. 3) The absolute planet throughput is >10%, even for unfavorable telescope architectures. 4) Broadband solutions ($\Delta\lambda/\lambda>0.1$) are readily available for both monolithic and segmented apertures. The latter make use of grayscale apodizers in an upstream pupil plane to provide suppression of diffracted light from amplitude discontinuities in the telescope pupil without inducing additional stroke on the deformable mirrors. We set wavefront stability requirements on the telescope, based on a stellar irradiance threshold set at an angular separation of 3$\pm$0.5 $\lambda/D$ from the star, and discuss how some requirements may be relaxed by trading robustness to aberrations for planet throughput.
  • As planning for the next generation of high contrast imaging instruments (e.g. WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR, TMT-PFI, EELT-EPICS) matures, and second-generation ground-based extreme adaptive optics facilities (e.g. VLT-SPHERE, Gemini-GPI) are halfway through their principal surveys, it is imperative that the performance of different designs, post-processing algorithms, observing strategies, and survey results be compared in a consistent, statistically robust framework. In this paper, we argue that the current industry standard for such comparisons -- the contrast curve -- falls short of this mandate. We propose a new figure of merit, the "performance map," that incorporates three fundamental concepts in signal detection theory: the true positive fraction (TPF), false positive fraction (FPF), and detection threshold. By supplying a theoretical basis and recipe for generating the performance map, we hope to encourage the widespread adoption of this new metric across subfields in exoplanet imaging.
  • The detection of molecular species in the atmospheres of earth-like exoplanets orbiting nearby stars requires an optical system that suppresses starlight and maximizes the sensitivity to the weak planet signals at small angular separations. Achieving sufficient contrast performance on a segmented aperture space telescope is particularly challenging due to unwanted diffraction within the telescope from amplitude and phase discontinuities in the pupil. Apodized vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that theoretically meet the performance needs for high contrast imaging with future segmented space telescopes. We investigate the sensitivity of apodized vortex coronagraphs to the expected aberrations, including segment co-phasing errors in piston and tip/tilt as well as other low-order and mid-spatial frequency aberrations. Coronagraph designs and their associated telescope requirements are identified for conceptual HabEx and LUVOIR telescope designs.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets or circumstellar disk material requires extreme contrast at the 10-6 to 10-12 levels at < 100 mas angular separation from the star. Focal-plane mask (FPM) coronagraphic imaging has played a key role in this field, taking advantage of progress in Adaptive Optics on ground-based 8+m class telescopes. However, large telescope entrance pupils usually consist of complex, sometimes segmented, non-ideal apertures, which include a central obstruction for the secondary mirror and its support structure. In practice, this negatively impacts wavefront quality and coronagraphic performance, in terms of achievable contrast and inner working angle. Recent theoretical works on structured darkness have shown that solutions for FPM phase profiles, optimized for non-ideal apertures, can be numerically derived. Here we present and discuss a first experimental validation of this concept, using reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulators as adaptive FPM coronagraphs.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets presents a formidable technical challenge owing to the small angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High Dispersion Coronagraphy (HDC) is a pathway to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to Earth-like planets in the habitable zone. Here, we present a framework to simulate HDC observations and data analyses. The goal of these simulations is to perform a detailed analysis of the trade-off between raw star light suppression and spectral resolution for various instrument configurations, target types, and science cases. We predict the performance of an HDC instrument at Keck observatory for characterizing directly imaged gas-giant planets in near infrared bands. We also simulate HDC observations of an Earth-like planet using next-generation ground-based (TMT) and spaced-base telescopes (HabEx and LUVOIR). We conclude that ground-based ELTs are more suitable for HDC observations of an Earth-like planet than future space-based missions owing to the considerable difference in collecting area. For ground-based telescopes, HDC observations can detect an Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around an M dwarf star at 10$^{-4}$ starlight suppression level. Compared to the 10$^{-7}$ planet/star contrast, HDC relaxes the starlight suppression requirement by a factor of 10$^3$. For space-based telescopes, detector noise will be a major limitation at spectral resolutions higher than 10$^4$. Considering detector noise and speckle chromatic noise, R=400 (1600) is the optimal spectral resolutions for HabEx(LUVOIR). The corresponding starlight suppression requirement to detect a planet with planet/star contrast=$6.1\times10^{-11}$ is relaxed by a factor of 10 (100) for HabEx (LUVOIR).
  • High-dispersion coronagraphy (HDC) optimally combines high contrast imaging techniques such as adaptive optics/wavefront control plus coronagraphy to high spectral resolution spectroscopy. HDC is a critical pathway towards fully characterizing exoplanet atmospheres across a broad range of masses from giant gaseous planets down to Earth-like planets. In addition to determining the molecular composition of exoplanet atmospheres, HDC also enables Doppler mapping of atmosphere inhomogeneities (temperature, clouds, wind), as well as precise measurements of exoplanet rotational velocities. Here, we demonstrate an innovative concept for injecting the directly-imaged planet light into a single-mode fiber, linking a high-contrast adaptively-corrected coronagraph to a high-resolution spectrograph (diffraction-limited or not). Our laboratory demonstration includes three key milestones: close-to-theoretical injection efficiency, accurate pointing and tracking, on-fiber coherent modulation and speckle nulling of spurious starlight signal coupling into the fiber. Using the extreme modal selectivity of single-mode fibers, we also demonstrated speckle suppression gains that outperform conventional image-based speckle nulling by at least two orders of magnitude.
  • The masses, atmospheric makeups, spin-orbit alignments, and system architectures of extrasolar planets can be best studied when the planets orbit bright stars. We report the discovery of three bodies orbiting HD 106315, a bright (V = 8.97 mag) F5 dwarf targeted by our K2 survey for transiting exoplanets. Two small, transiting planets have radii of 2.23 (+0.30/-0.25) R_Earth and 3.95 (+0.42/-0.39) R_Earth and orbital periods of 9.55 d and 21.06 d, respectively. A radial velocity (RV) trend of 0.3 +/- 0.1 m/s/d indicates the likely presence of a third body orbiting HD 106315 with period >160 d and mass >45 M_Earth. Transits of this object would have depths of >0.1% and are definitively ruled out. Though the star has v sin i = 13.2 km/s, it exhibits short-timescale RV variability of just 6.4 m/s, and so is a good target for RV measurements of the mass and density of the inner two planets and the outer object's orbit and mass. Furthermore, the combination of RV noise and moderate v sin i makes HD 106315 a valuable laboratory for studying the spin-orbit alignment of small planets through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Space-based atmospheric characterization of the two transiting planets via transit and eclipse spectroscopy should also be feasible. This discovery demonstrates again the power of K2 to find compelling exoplanets worthy of future study.
  • Current state-of-the-art high contrast imaging instruments take advantage of a number of elegant coronagraph designs to suppress starlight and image nearby faint objects, such as exoplanets and circumstellar disks. The ideal performance and complexity of the optical systems depends strongly on the shape of the telescope aperture. Unfortunately, large primary mirrors tend to be segmented and have various obstructions, which limit the performance of most conventional coronagraph designs. We present a new family of vortex coronagraphs with numerically-optimized gray-scale apodizers that provide the sensitivity needed to directly image faint exoplanets with large, segmented aperture telescopes, including the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) as well as potential next-generation space telescopes.