• We investigate the dynamical evolution of galaxies in groups with different formation epochs. Galaxy groups have been selected to be in different dynamical states, namely dynamically old and dynamically young, which reflect their early and late formation times, respectively, based on their halo mass assembly. Brightest galaxies in dynamically young groups have suffered their last major galaxy merger typically $\sim 2$ Gyr more recently than their counterparts in dynamically old groups. Furthermore, we study the evolution of velocity dispersion in these two classes and compare them with the analytic models of isolated halos. The velocity dispersion of dwarf galaxies in high mass, dynamically young groups increases slowly in time, while the analogous dispersion in dynamically old high-mass groups is constant. In contrast, the velocity dispersion of giant galaxies in low mass groups decreases rapidly at late times. This increasing velocity bias is caused by dynamical friction, and starts much earlier in the dynamically old groups. The recent Radio-SAGE model of galaxy formation suggests that radio luminosities of central galaxies, considered to be tracers of AGN activity, are linked to the formation history of their halos.
  • In the local Universe, the existence of very young galaxies (VYGs), having formed at least half their stellar mass in the last 1 Gyr, is debated. We predict the present-day fraction of VYGs among central galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass. For this, we apply to high mass resolution Monte-Carlo halo merger trees (MCHMTs) three (one) analytical models of galaxy formation, where the ratio of stellar to halo mass (mass growth rate) is a function of halo mass and redshift. Galaxy merging is delayed until orbital decay by dynamical friction. With starbursts associated with halo mergers, our models predict typically one percent of VYGs up to galaxy masses of $10^{10}$ M$_\odot$, falling rapidly at higher masses, and VYGs are usually associated with recent major mergers of their haloes. Without these starbursts, two of the models have VYG fractions reduced by 1 or 2 dex at low or intermediate stellar masses, and VYGs are rarely associated with major halo mergers. In comparison, the state-of-the-art semi-analytical model (SAM) of Henriques et al. produces only 0.01% of VYGs at intermediate masses. Finally, the Menci et al. SAM run on MCMHTs with Warm Dark Matter cosmology generates 10 times more VYGs at masses below $10^8$ M$_\odot$ than when run with Cold Dark Matter. The wide range in these VYG fractions illustrates the usefulness of VYGs to constrain both galaxy formation and cosmological models.
  • We present a comparison of nine galaxy formation models, eight semi-analytical and one halo occupation distribution model, run on the same underlying cold dark matter simulation (cosmological box of co-moving width 125$h^{-1}$ Mpc, with a dark-matter particle mass of $1.24\times 10^9 h^{-1}$ Msun) and the same merger trees. While their free parameters have been calibrated to the same observational data sets using two approaches, they nevertheless retain some 'memory' of any previous calibration that served as the starting point (especially for the manually-tuned models). For the first calibration, models reproduce the observed z = 0 galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) within 3-{\sigma}. The second calibration extended the observational data to include the z = 2 SMF alongside the z~0 star formation rate function, cold gas mass and the black hole-bulge mass relation. Encapsulating the observed evolution of the SMF from z = 2 to z = 0 is found to be very hard within the context of the physics currently included in the models. We finally use our calibrated models to study the evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) ratio. For all models we find that the peak value of the SHM relation decreases with redshift. However, the trends seen for the evolution of the peak position as well as the mean scatter in the SHM relation are rather weak and strongly model dependent. Both the calibration data sets and model results are publicly available.
  • Dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as their abundance and cusp-core problems, remain a prime challenge in our understanding of galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryonic physics could potentially solve these issues, but the efficiency of stellar feedback is still controversial. We analytically explore the possibility of feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in dwarf galaxies and compare AGN and supernova (SN) feedback. We assume the presence of an intermediate mass black hole within low mass galaxies and standard scaling relations between the relevant physical quantities. We model the propagation and properties of the outflow and explore the critical condition for global gas ejection. Performing the same calculation for SNe, we compare the ability of AGN and SNe to drive gas out of galaxies. We find that a critical halo mass exists below which AGN feedback can remove gas from the host halo and that the critical halo mass for AGN is greater than the equivalent for SNe in a significant part of the parameter space, suggesting that AGN could provide an alternative and more successful source of negative feedback than SNe, even in the most massive dwarf galaxies.
  • [Abridged] We use the WINGS database to select a sample of 67 nearby galaxy clusters with at least 30 spectroscopic members each. 53 of these clusters do not show evidence of substructures in phase-space, while 14 do. We estimate the virial radii and circular velocities of the 67 clusters by a variety of proxies (velocity dispersion, X-ray temperature, and richness) and use these estimates to build stack samples from these 53 and 14 clusters ('Reg' and 'Irr' stacks, respectively). We determine the number-density and velocity-dispersion profiles (VDPs) of E, S0, and Sp+Irr (S) galaxies in the Reg and Irr samples, separately, and fit models to these profiles. The number density profiles of E, S0, and S galaxies are adequately described by either a NFW or a cored King model, both for the Reg and Irr samples, with a slight preference for the NFW model. The spatial distribution concentration increases from the S to the S0 and to the E populations, both in the Reg and the Irr stacks, reflecting the well-known morphology-radius relation. Reg clusters have a more concentrated spatial distribution of E and S0 galaxies than Irr clusters, while the spatial distributions of S galaxies in Reg and Irr clusters are similar. We propose a new phenomenological model that provides acceptable fits to the VDP of all our galaxy samples. The VDPs become steeper and with a higher normalization from E to S0 to S galaxies. The S0 VDP is close to that of E galaxies in Reg clusters, and intermediate between those of E and S galaxies in Irr clusters. Our results suggest that S galaxies are a recently accreted cluster population, that take less than 3 Gyr to evolve into S0 galaxies after accretion, and in doing so modify their phase-space distribution, approaching that of cluster ellipticals. While in Reg clusters this evolutionary process is mostly completed, it is still ongoing in Irr clusters.
  • While the density profiles (DPs) of $\Lambda$CDM haloes obey the NFW law out to roughly one virial radius, $r_{\rm vir}$, the structure of their outer parts is still poorly understood, since the 1-halo term describing the halo itself is dominated by the 2-halo term representing the other haloes picked up. Using a semi-analytical model, we measure the real-space `1-halo' number DP of groups out to $20\,r_{\rm vir}$ by assigning each galaxy to its nearest group with mass above $M_{\rm a}$, in units of the group $r_{\rm vir}$. If $M_{\rm a}$ is small (large), the outer DP of groups falls rapidly (slowly). We find that there is an optimal $M_{\rm a}$ for which the stacked DP resembles the NFW model to $0.1$ dex accuracy out to $\simeq 13\,r_{\rm vir}$. We find similar long-range NFW surface DPs (out to $\simeq 10\,r_{\rm vir}$) in the SDSS observations using a galaxy assignment scheme that combines the non-linear virialized regions of groups with their linear outer parts. The optimal $M_{\rm a}$ scales as the minimum mass of the groups that are stacked to the power $0.25-0.3$. Our results suggest that the NFW model does not solely originate from violent relaxation. Moreover, populating haloes with galaxies using HOD models must proceed out to larger radii than usually done.
  • The gap between first and second ranked galaxy magnitudes in groups is often considered a tracer of their merger histories, which in turn may affect galaxy properties, and also serves to test galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We remeasure the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of the Main Galaxy Sample of the SDSS in an appropriately cleaned subsample of groups from the Yang catalog. We find that, at low group masses, our best-fit CLF have steeper satellite high ends, yet higher ratios of characteristic satellite to central luminosities in comparison with the CLF of Yang et al. (2008). The observed fractions of groups with large and small magnitude gaps as well as the Tremaine & Richstone (1977) statistics, are not compatible with either a single Schechter LF or with a Schechter-like satellite plus lognormal central LF. These gap statistics, which naturally depend on the size of the subsamples, and also on the maximum projected radius, $R_{\rm max}$, for defining the 2nd brightest galaxy, can only be reproduced with two-component CLFs if we allow small gap groups to preferentially have two central galaxies, as expected when groups merge. Finally, we find that the trend of higher gap for higher group velocity dispersion, $\sigma_{\rm v}$, at given richness, discovered by Hearin et al. (2013), is strongly reduced when we consider $\sigma_{\rm v}$ in bins of richness, and virtually disappears when we use group mass instead of $\sigma_{\rm v}$. This limits the applicability of gaps in refining cosmographic studies based on cluster counts.
  • We present a clustering comparison of 12 galaxy formation models (including Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs) and Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models) all run on halo catalogues and merger trees extracted from a single {\Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. We compare the results of the measurements of the mean halo occupation numbers, the radial distribution of galaxies in haloes and the 2-Point Correlation Functions (2PCF). We also study the implications of the different treatments of orphan (galaxies not assigned to any dark matter subhalo) and non-orphan galaxies in these measurements. Our main result is that the galaxy formation models generally agree in their clustering predictions but they disagree significantly between HOD and SAMs for the orphan satellites. Although there is a very good agreement between the models on the 2PCF of central galaxies, the scatter between the models when orphan satellites are included can be larger than a factor of 2 for scales smaller than 1 Mpc/h. We also show that galaxy formation models that do not include orphan satellite galaxies have a significantly lower 2PCF on small scales, consistent with previous studies. Finally, we show that the 2PCF of orphan satellites is remarkably different between SAMs and HOD models. Orphan satellites in SAMs present a higher clustering than in HOD models because they tend to occupy more massive haloes. We conclude that orphan satellites have an important role on galaxy clustering and they are the main cause of the differences in the clustering between HOD models and SAMs.
  • We compare the mean mass assembly histories of compact and fossil galaxy groups in the Millennium dark matter simulation and an associated semi-analytic galaxy formation model. Tracing the halo mass of compact groups (CGs) from z=0 to z=1 shows that, on average, 55 per cent of the halo mass in compact groups is assembled since z~1, compared to 40 per cent of the halo mass in fossil groups (FGs) in the same time interval, indicating that compared to FGs, CGs are relatively younger galaxy systems. At z=0, for a given halo mass, fossil groups tend to have a larger concentration than compact groups. Investigating the evolution of CG's parameters show that they become more compact with time. CGs at z=0.5 see their magnitude gaps increase exponentially, but it takes ~10 Gyr for them to reach a magnitude gap of 2 magnitudes. The slow growth of the magnitude gap leads to only a minority (~41 per cent) of CGs selected at z=0.5 turning into a FG by z=0. Also, while three-quarters of FGs go through a compact phase, most fail to meet the CG isolation criterion, leaving only ~30 per cent of FGs fully satisfying the CG selection criteria. Therefore, there is no strong link of CGs turning into FGs or FGs originating from CGs. The relation between CGs and FGs is thus more complex, and in most cases, FGs and CGs follow different evolutionary tracks.
  • The velocity distribution function (VDF) of dark matter (DM) halos in $\Lambda$CDM dissipationless cosmological simulations, which must be non-separable in its radial and tangential components, is still poorly known. We present the first single-parameter, non-separable, anisotropic model for the VDF in $\Lambda$CDM halos, built from an isotropic $q$-Gaussian (Tsallis) VDF of the isotropic set of dimensionless spherical velocity components (after subtraction of streaming motions), normalized by the respective velocity dispersions. We test our VDF on 90 cluster-mass halos of a dissipationless cosmological simulation. Beyond the virial radius, $r_{\rm vir}$, our model VDF adequately reproduces that measured in the simulated halos, but no $q$-Gaussian model can adequately represent the VDF within $r_{\rm vir}$, as the speed distribution function is then flatter-topped than any $q$-Gaussian can allow. Nevertheless, our VDF fits significantly better the simulations than the commonly used Maxwellian (Gaussian) distribution, at virtually all radii within $5\,r_{\rm vir}$. Within 0.4 (1) $r_{\rm vir}$, the non-Gaussianity index $q$ is (roughly) linearly related to the slope of the density profile and also to the velocity anisotropy profile. We provide a parametrization of the modulation of $q$ with radius for both the median fits and the fit of the stacked halo. At radii of a few percent of $r_{\rm vir}$, corresponding to the Solar position in the Milky Way, our best-fit VDF, although fitting better the simulations than the Gaussian one, overproduces significantly the fraction of high velocity objects, indicating that one should not blindly use these $q$-Gaussian fits to make predictions on the direct detection rate of DM particles.
  • We derive the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) sensitivity to dark matter (DM) annihilation in several primary channels, over a broad range of DM masses. These sensitivities are estimated when CTA is pointed towards a large sample of Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with promising $J$-factors and small statistical uncertainties. This analysis neglects systematic uncertainties, which we estimate at the level of at least 1 dex. We also present sensitivities on the annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 4 dSphs. We assess the CTA sensitivity by: $i)$ using, for each dSph, a recent determination of the $J$-factor and its statistical error; $ii)$ considering the most up-to-date cosmic ray background; and $iii)$ including both spatial and spectral terms in the likelihood analysis. We find that a joint spectral and spatial analysis improves the CTA sensitivity, in particular for primary channels with sharp features in the $\gamma$-ray energy spectrum and for dSphs with steep $J$-factor profiles, as deduced from the internal kinematics. The greatest sensitivities are obtained for observations of Ursa Minor among the classical dSphs and of Ursa Major II for ultra-faint dSphs.
  • The quasar mode of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the high-redshift Universe is routinely observed in gas-rich galaxies together with large-scale AGN-driven winds. It is crucial to understand how photons emitted by the central AGN source couple to the ambient interstellar-medium to trigger large-scale outflows. By means of radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of idealised galactic discs, we study the coupling of photons with the multiphase galactic gas, and how it varies with gas cloud sizes, and the radiation bands included in the simulations, which are ultraviolet (UV), optical, and infrared (IR). We show how a quasar with a luminosity of $10^{46}$ erg/s can drive large-scale winds with velocities of $10^2-10^3$ km/s and mass outflow rates around $10^3$ M$_\odot$/yr for times of order a few million years. Infrared radiation is necessary to efficiently transfer momentum to the gas via multi-scattering on dust in dense clouds. However, IR multi-scattering, despite being extremely important at early times, quickly declines as the central gas cloud expands and breaks up, allowing the radiation to escape through low gas density channels. The typical number of multi-scattering events for an IR photon is only about a quarter of the mean optical depth from the center of the cloud. Our models account for the observed outflow rates of $\sim$500-1000 M$_\odot$/yr and high velocities of $\sim 10^3$ km/s, favouring winds that are energy-driven via extremely fast nuclear outflows, interpreted here as being IR-radiatively-driven winds.
  • We study the internal kinematics of galaxy clusters in the region beyond the sphere of virialization. Galaxies around a virialized cluster are infalling towards the cluster centre with a non-zero mean radial velocity. We develop a new formalism for describing the dynamical state of clusters, by generalizing the standard Jeans formalism with the inclusion of the peculiar infall motions of galaxies and the Hubble expansion as well as the contributions due to background cosmology. Using empirical fits to the radial profiles of density, mean radial velocity and velocity anisotropy of both a stacked cluster-mass halo and two isolated halos of a cosmological dark matter only simulation, we verify that our generalized Jeans equation correctly predicts the radial velocity dispersion out to 4 virial radii. We find that the radial velocity dispersion inferred from the standard Jeans equation is accurate up to 2 virial radii, but overestimated by \approx 20% for the stacked halo and by \approx 40% for the isolated halos, in the range \approx 2-3 virial radii. Our model depends on the logarithmic growth rate of the virial radius (function of halo mass or concentration), which we estimate in 7 different ways, and on the departure from self-similarity of the evolution of the peculiar velocity profile in virial units.
  • Quasars powered by massive black holes (BHs) with mass estimates above a billion solar masses have been identified at redshift 6 and beyond. The existence of such BHs requires almost continuous growth at the Eddington limit for their whole lifetime, of order of one billion years. In this paper, we explore the possibility that positively skewed scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations may ease the assembly of massive BHs. In particular, they produce more low-mass halos at high redshift, thus altering the production of metals and ultra-violet flux, believed to be important factors in BH formation. Additionally, a higher number of progenitors and of nearly equal-mass halo mergers would boost the mass increase provided by BH-BH mergers and merger-driven accretion. We use a set of two cosmological simulations, with either Gaussian or scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations to perform a proof-of-concept experiment to estimate how BH formation and growth are altered. We estimate the BH number density and the fraction of halos where BHs form, for both simulations and for two popular scenarios of BH formation (remnants of the first generation of stars and direct collapse in the absence of metals and molecular hydrogen). We find that the fractions of halos where BHs form are almost identical, but that non-Gaussian primordial perturbations increase the total number density of BHs for the both BH formation scenarios. We also evolve BHs using merger trees extracted from the simulations and find that non-Gaussianities increase both the BH masses and the number of the most massive BHs.
  • We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investigate a common approach to model calibration. This paper provides a unified description for all participating models and presents the initial, uncalibrated comparison as a baseline for our future studies where we will develop a common calibration framework and address the extent to which that reduces the scatter in the model predictions seen here.
  • Feedback in massive galaxies generally involves quenching of star formation, a favored candidate being outflows from a central supermassive black hole. At high redshifts however, explanation of the huge rates of star formation often found in galaxies containing AGN may require a more vigorous mode of star formation than attainable by simply enriching the gas content of galaxies in the usual gravitationally-driven mode that is associated with the nearby Universe. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that AGN-pressure-driven star formation potentially provides the positive feedback that may be required to generate the accelerated star formation rates observed in the distant Universe.
  • [Abridged] Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z > 6 is one of the big challenges of current high redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run 5 N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to M_UV = -14 at redshift 7 < z < 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on < Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth tau_E. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of tau_E still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that tau_E could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations.
  • Primordial non-Gaussianities provide an important test of inflationary models. Although the Planck CMB experiment has produced strong limits on non-Gaussianity on scales of clusters, there is still room for considerable non-Gaussianity on galactic scales. We have tested the effect of local non-Gaussianity on the high redshift galaxy population by running five cosmological N-body simulations down to z=6.5. For these simulations, we adopt the same initial phases, and either Gaussian or scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations, all consistent with the constraints set by Planck on clusters scales. We then assign stellar masses to each halo using the halo - stellar mass empirical relation of Behroozi et al. (2013). Our simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions produce halo mass functions that show clear departures from those obtained from the analogous simulations with Gaussian initial conditions at z>~10. We observe a >0.3 dex enhancement of the low-end of the halo mass function, which leads to a similar effect on the galaxy stellar mass function, which should be testable with future galaxy surveys at z>10. As cosmic reionization is thought to be driven by dwarf galaxies at high redshift, our findings may have implications for the reionization history of the Universe.
  • We study the kinematics of satellites around isolated galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic catalog. Using a model of the phase-space density previously measured for the halos of LCDM dark matter cosmological simulations, we determine the properties of the halo mass distribution and the orbital anisotropy of the satellites as a function of the colour-based morphological type and the stellar mass of the central host galaxy. We place constraints on the halo mass and the concentration parameter of dark matter and the satellite number density profiles. We obtain a concentration-mass relation for galactic dark matter haloes that is consistent with predictions of a standard LCDM cosmological model. At given halo or stellar mass, red galaxies have more concentrated halos than their blue counterparts. The fraction of dark matter within a few effective radii is minimal for 11.25<log M_star<11.5. The number density profile of the satellites appears to be shallower than of dark matter, with the scale radius typically 60 per cent larger than of dark matter. The orbital anisotropy around red hosts exhibits a mild excess of radial motions, in agreement with the typical anisotropy profiles found in cosmological simulations, whereas blue galaxies are found to be consistent with an isotropic velocity distribution. Our new constraints on the halo masses of galaxies are used to provide analytic approximations of the halo-to-stellar mass relation for red and blue galaxies.
  • Following a first study of the central regions of M32 that illustrated the power of integral-field spectroscopy (IFS) in detecting and measuring the [O III]{\lambda}5007 emission of PNe against a strong stellar background, we turn to the very nuclear PN population of M31, within 80 pc of its centre. We show that PNe can also be found in the presence of emission from diffuse gas and further illustrate the excellent sensitivity of IFS in detecting extragalactic PNe through a comparison with narrowband images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the nuclear PNe population of M31 is only marginally consistent with the generally adopted form of the PNe luminosity function (PNLF). In particular, this is due to a lack of PNe with absolute magnitude M5007 brighter than -3, which would only result from a rather unfortunate draw from such a model PNLF. We suggest that the observed lack of bright PNe in the nuclear regions of M31 is due to a horizontal-branch population that is more tilted toward less massive and hotter He-burning stars, so that its progeny consists mostly of UV-bright stars that fail to climb back up the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and only of few, if any, bright PNe powered by central post-AGB stars. These results are also consistent with recent reports on a dearth of bright post-AGB stars towards the nucleus of M31, and lend further support to the idea that the metallicity of a stellar population has an impact on the way the horizontal branch is populated and to the loose anticorrelation between the strength of the UV-upturn and the specific number of PNe that is observed in early-type galaxies. Finally, our investigation also serves to stress the importance of considering the same spatial scales when comparing the PNe population of galaxies with the properties of their stellar populations.
  • The efficiency of recent star formation (SF) in galaxies increases with increasing projected distance from the centre of a cluster out to several times its virial radius (R_v). Using a complete sample of galaxies in 268 clusters from the SDSS DR4, we investigate how, at a given projected radius from the cluster centre, M* and SF properties of a galaxy depend on its absolute line-of-sight velocity in the cluster rest frame, |v_LOS|. We find that for R<0.5 R_v, the fraction of high mass non-BCG galaxies increases towards the centre for low |v_LOS|. At a given projected radius, the fraction of Galaxies with Ongoing or Recent (<1-3 Gyr) Efficient Star Formation (GORES, with EW(H_delta)>2 ang & D_4000>1.5) is slightly but significantly lower for low |v_LOS| galaxies than for their high velocity counterparts. We study these observational trends with the help of a dark matter (DM) cosmological simulation. We find that the backsplash particles account for at least one-third (half) of all particles at projected radii slightly greater than the virial radius and |v_LOS|<sigma_v. The deprojection of the GORES fraction leads to a saturated linear increase with radius. We fit simple models of the fraction of GORES as a function of class only or class and distance to the cluster centre (as in our deprojected fraction). In our best-fitting model GORES account for 13% of galaxies within the virial sphere, 11% of the virial population, 34% of the distant (for projected radii R<2 R_v) infall population and 19% of the backsplash galaxies. Given the 1-3 Gyr lookback time of our GORES indicators, these results suggest that SF in a galaxy is almost completely quenched in a single passage through the cluster.
  • There is a long-standing controversy about the convergence of the dipole moment of the galaxy angular distribution (the so-called clustering dipole). We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies as a function of the limiting flux of the sample from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Contrary to some earlier claims, we find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e. up to 13.5 mag in the near-infrared K_s band (equivalent to an effective distance of 300 Mpc/h). We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional one (i.e., given the velocity of the Local Group relative to the CMB), for the LambdaCDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by WMAP. The observed growth turns out to be within 1-sigma confidence level of its theoretical counterpart once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux-limited catalog is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top-hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges to its final value for a distance of about 300 Mpc/h. By comparing the observational windows, we show that for a given flux limit and a corresponding distance limit, the 2MASS flux-weighted window passes less large-scale signal than the top-hat one. We conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole for effective distances greater than 200 Mpc/h is only apparent. On the other hand, for a distance of 80 Mpc/h (mean depth of the 2MASS Redshift Survey) and the LambdaCDM power spectrum, the true dipole is expected to reach only ~80% of its final value. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate beta = (Omega_m)^0.55 / b. The result is beta = 0.38+-0.04, which leads to an estimate of the density parameter Omega_m = 0.20+-0.08.
  • A simple, 1-equation, galaxy formation model is applied to both the halo merger tree derived from a high-resolution dissipationless cosmological simulation and to 1/4 million Monte-Carlo halo merger trees. The galaxy formation model involves a sharp entropy barrier against the accretion of gas onto low-mass halos, the shock heating of infalling gas far from the central regions of massive halos, and supernova feedback that drives the gas out of shallow halo potential wells. With the first approach, we show that the large majority of galaxies within group- and cluster-mass halos, known to be mainly dwarf ellipticals, have acquired the bulk of their stellar mass through gas accretion and not via galaxy mergers. With the second approach, we qualitatively reproduce the downsizing trend of greater ages at greater masses in stars and predict an upsizing trend of greater ages as one proceeds to masses lower than 10^10 M_Sun. We find that the fraction of galaxies with very young stellar populations (more than half the stellar mass formed within the last 1.5 Gyr) is a function of present-day stellar mass, which peaks at 0.5% at m_crit=10^7.5-9.5 M_Sun, roughly corresponding to the masses of blue compact dwarfs. We predict that the stellar mass function of galaxies should not show a maximum at m_stars > 10^{5.5}, M_Sun, with a power-law stellar mass function with slope approx -1.6 if the IGM temperature in the outskirts of halos before reionization is set by H2 cooling. We speculate on the nature of the lowest mass galaxies.
  • We study the growth of the clustering dipole of galaxies from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). We find that the dipole does not converge before the completeness limit of the 2MASS Extended Source Catalog, i.e. up to about 300 Mpc/h. We compare the observed growth of the dipole with the theoretically expected, conditional growth for the LambdaCDM power spectrum and cosmological parameters constrained by WMAP. The observed growth turns out to be within 1-sigma confidence level of the theoretical one, once the proper observational window of the 2MASS flux dipole is included. For a contrast, if the adopted window is a top hat, then the predicted dipole grows significantly faster and converges to its final value at a distance of about 200 Mpc/h. We study the difference between the top-hat window and the window for the flux-limited 2MASS survey and we conclude that the growth of the 2MASS dipole at effective distances greater than 200 Mpc/h is only apparent. Eventually, since for the window function of 2MASS the predicted growth is consistent with the observed one, we can compare the two to evaluate beta = (Omega_m)^0.55 / b. The result is beta = 0.38+-0.05, which gives a rough estimate of Omega_m = 0.2+-0.1.
  • Traditionally, the mass / velocity anisotropy degeneracy (MAD) inherent in the spherical, stationary, non-streaming Jeans equation has been handled by assuming a mass profile and fitting models to the observed kinematical data. Here, the opposite approach is considered: the equation of anisotropic kinematic projection is inverted for known arbitrary anisotropy to yield the space radial velocity dispersion profile in terms of an integral involving the radial profiles of anisotropy and isotropic dynamical pressure. Then, through the Jeans equation, the mass profile is derived in terms of double integrals of observable quantities. Single integral formulas for both deprojection and mass inversion are provided for several simple anisotropy models (isotropic, radial, circular, general constant, Osipkov-Merritt, Mamon-Lokas and Diemand-Moore-Stadel). Tests of the mass inversion on NFW models with these anisotropy models yield accurate results in the case of perfect observational data, and typically better than 70% (in 4 cases out of 5) accurate mass profiles for the sampling errors expected from current observational data on clusters of galaxies. For the NFW model with mildly increasing radial anisotropy, the mass is found to be insensitive to the adopted anisotropy profile at 7 scale radii and to the adopted anisotropy radius at 3 scale radii. This anisotropic mass inversion method is a useful complementary tool to analyze the mass and anisotropy profiles of spherical systems. It provides the practical means to lift the MAD in quasi-spherical systems such as globular clusters, round dwarf spheroidal and elliptical galaxies, as well as groups and clusters of galaxies, when the anisotropy of the tracer is expected to be linearly related to the slope of its density.