• We compare the physical and morphological properties of z ~ 2 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) identified in the HETDEX Pilot Survey and narrow band studies with those of z ~ 2 optical emission line galaxies (oELGs) identified via HST WFC3 infrared grism spectroscopy. Both sets of galaxies extend over the same range in stellar mass (7.5 < logM < 10.5), size (0.5 < R < 3.0 kpc), and star-formation rate (~1 < SFR < 100). Remarkably, a comparison of the most commonly used physical and morphological parameters -- stellar mass, half-light radius, UV slope, star formation rate, ellipticity, nearest neighbor distance, star formation surface density, specific star formation rate, [O III] luminosity, and [O III] equivalent width -- reveals no statistically significant differences between the populations. This suggests that the processes and conditions which regulate the escape of Ly-alpha from a z ~ 2 star-forming galaxy do not depend on these quantities. In particular, the lack of dependence on the UV slope suggests that Ly-alpha emission is not being significantly modulated by diffuse dust in the interstellar medium. We develop a simple model of Ly-alpha emission that connects LAEs to all high-redshift star forming galaxies where the escape of Ly-alpha depends on the sightline through the galaxy. Using this model, we find that mean solid angle for Ly-alpha escape is 2.4+/-0.8 steradians; this value is consistent with those calculated from other studies.
  • Galaxy proto-clusters at z >~ 2 provide a direct probe of the rapid mass assembly and galaxy growth of present day massive clusters. Because of the need of precise galaxy redshifts for density mapping and the prevalence of star formation before quenching, nearly all the proto-clusters known to date were confirmed by spectroscopy of galaxies with strong emission lines. Therefore, large emission-line galaxy surveys provide an efficient way to identify proto-clusters directly. Here we report the discovery of a large-scale structure at z = 2.44 in the HETDEX Pilot Survey. On a scale of a few tens of Mpc comoving, this structure shows a complex overdensity of Lya emitters (LAE), which coincides with broad-band selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA photometric and zCOSMOS spectroscopic catalogs, as well as overdensities of intergalactic gas revealed in the Lya absorption maps of Lee et al. (2014). We construct mock LAE catalogs to predict the cosmic evolution of this structure. We find that such an overdensity should have already broken away from the Hubble flow, and part of the structure will collapse to form a galaxy cluster with 10^14.5 +- 0.4 M_sun by z = 0. The structure contains a higher median stellar mass of broad-band selected galaxies, a boost of extended Lya nebulae, and a marginal excess of active galactic nuclei relative to the field, supporting a scenario of accelerated galaxy evolution in cluster progenitors. Based on the correlation between galaxy overdensity and the z = 0 descendant halo mass calibrated in the simulation, we predict that several hundred 1.9 < z < 3.5 proto-clusters with z = 0 mass of > 10^14.5 M_sun will be discovered in the 8.5 Gpc^3 of space surveyed by the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment.
  • We compare the H-beta line strengths of 1.90 < z < 2.35 star-forming galaxies observed with the near-IR grism of the Hubble Space Telescope with ground-based measurements of Ly-alpha from the HETDEX Pilot Survey and narrow-band imaging. By examining the line ratios of 73 galaxies, we show that most star-forming systems at this epoch have a Ly-alpha escape fraction below ~6%. We confirm this result by using stellar reddening to estimate the effective logarithmic extinction of the H-beta emission line (c_Hbeta = 0.5) and measuring both the H-beta and Ly-alpha luminosity functions in a ~ 100,000 cubic Mpc volume of space. We show that in our redshift window, the volumetric Ly-alpha escape fraction is at most 4.4+/-2.1(1.2)%, with an additional systematic ~25% uncertainty associated with our estimate of extinction. Finally, we demonstrate that the bulk of the epoch's star-forming galaxies have Ly-alpha emission line optical depths that are significantly greater than that for the underlying UV continuum. In our predominantly [O~III] 5007-selected sample of galaxies, resonant scattering must be important for the escape of Ly-alpha photons.
  • As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compare the information gathering power of these replicated instruments with the present state of the art in more traditional spectrographs, and with instruments under development for ELTs. Design principles for replication are explored along with lessons learned, and we look forward to future technologies that could make massively-replicated instruments even more compelling.
  • The Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) is a baseline array of 150 copies of a simple, fiber-fed integral field spectrograph that will be deployed on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). VIRUS is the first optical astronomical instrument to be replicated on an industrial scale, and represents a relatively inexpensive solution for carrying out large-area spectroscopic surveys, such as the HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). Each spectrograph contains a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating with a 138 mm diameter clear aperture as its dispersing element. The instrument utilizes the grating in first-order for 350-550 nm. Including witness samples, a suite of 170 VPH gratings has been mass produced for VIRUS. Here, we present the design of the VIRUS VPH gratings and a discussion of their mass production. We additionally present the design and functionality of a custom apparatus that has been used to rapidly test the first-order diffraction efficiency of the gratings for various discrete wavelengths within the VIRUS spectral range. This device has been used to perform both in-situ tests to monitor the effects of adjustments to the production prescription as well as to carry out the final acceptance tests of the gratings' diffraction efficiency. Finally, we present the as-built performance results for the entire suite of VPH gratings.
  • The upcoming Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) has ushered in a new era of instrumentation for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). Here, we present the design, construction progress, and lab tests completed to date of the blue-optimized second generation Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS2-B). LRS2-B is a dual-channel, fiber fed instrument that is based on the design of the Visible Integral Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS), which is the new flagship instrument for carrying out the HET Dark Energy eXperiment (HETDEX). LRS2-B utilizes a microlens-coupled integral field unit (IFU) that covers a 7"x12" area on the sky having unity fill-factor with ~300 spatial elements that subsample the median HET image quality. The fiber feed assembly includes an optimized dichroic beam splitter that allows LRS2-B to simultaneously observe 370 nm to 470 nm and 460 nm to 700 nm at fixed resolving powers of R \approx 1900 and 1200, respectively. We discuss the departures from the nominal VIRUS design, which includes the IFU, fiber feed, camera correcting optics, and volume phase holographic grisms. Additionally, the motivation for the selection of the wavelength coverage and spectral resolution of the two channels is briefly discussed. One such motivation is the follow-up study of spectrally and (or) spatially resolved Lyman-alpha emission from z ~ 2.5 star-forming galaxies in the HETDEX survey. LRS2-B is planned to be a commissioning instrument for the HET WFU and should be on-sky during quarter 4 of 2013. Finally, we mention the current state of LRS2-R, the red optimized sister instrument of LRS2-B.
  • The second generation Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS2) is a new facility instrument for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). Based on the design of the Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS), which is the new flagship instrument for carrying out the HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), LRS2 provides integral field spectroscopy for a seeing-limited field of 12 x 6 arcseconds. For LRS2, the replicable design of VIRUS has been leveraged to gain broad wavelength coverage from 370 nm to 1 micron, spread between two fiber-fed dual-channel spectrographs, each of which can operate as an independent instrument. The blue spectrograph, LRS2-B, covers 370-470 nm and 460-700 nm at fixed resolving powers of ~1900 and ~1100, respectively, while the red spectrograph, LRS2-R, covers 650-842 nm and 818-1050 nm with both of its channels having a resolving power of ~1800. In this paper, we present a detailed description of the instrument's design in which we focus on the departures from the basic VIRUS framework. The primary modifications include the fore-optics that are used to feed the fiber integral field units at unity fill-factor, the cameras' correcting optics and detectors, and the volume phase holographic grisms. We also present a model of the instrument's sensitivity and a description of specific science cases that have driven the design of LRS2, including systematically studying the spatially resolved properties of extended Lyman-alpha blobs at 2 < z < 3. LRS2 will provide a powerful spectroscopic follow-up platform for large surveys such as HETDEX.
  • We present the results from a VLT/SINFONI and Keck/NIRSPEC near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 16 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $z$ = 2.1 - 2.5 in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields discovered from the HETDEX Pilot Survey. We detect rest-frame optical nebular lines (H$\alpha$ and/or [OIII]$\lambda$5007) for 10 of the LAEs and measure physical properties, including the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity, gas-mass fraction, and Ly$\alpha$ velocity offset. We find that LAEs may lie below the mass-metallicity relation for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. The LAEs all show velocity shifts of Ly$\alpha$ relative to the systemic redshift ranging between +85 and +296 km s$^{-1}$ with a mean of +180 km s$^{-1}$. This value is smaller than measured for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The Ly$\alpha$ velocity offsets show a moderate correlation with the measured star formation rate (2.5$\sigma$), but no significant correlations are seen with the SFR surface density, specific SFR, stellar mass, or dynamical mass ($\lesssim$ 1.5$\sigma$). Exploring the role of dust, kinematics of the interstellar medium (ISM), and geometry on the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons, we find no signature of selective quenching of resonantly scattered Ly$\alpha$ photons. However, we also find no evidence that a clumpy ISM is enhancing the Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width. Our results suggest that the low metallicity in LAEs may be responsible for yielding an environment with a low neutral hydrogen column density as well as less dust, easing the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons over that in continuum-selected star-forming galaxies.
  • We use broadband photometry extending from the rest-frame UV to the near-IR to fit the individual spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 63 bright (L(Ly-alpha) > 10^43 ergs/s) Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 < z < 3.6. We find that these LAEs are quite heterogeneous, with stellar masses that span over three orders of magnitude, from 7.5 < log M < 10.5. Moreover, although most LAEs have small amounts of extinction, some high-mass objects have stellar reddenings as large as E(B-V) ~0.4. Interestingly, in dusty objects the optical depths for Ly-alpha and the UV continuum are always similar, indicating that Ly-alpha photons are not undergoing many scatters before escaping their galaxy. In contrast, the ratio of optical depths in low-reddening systems can vary widely, illustrating the diverse nature of the systems. Finally, we show that in the star formation rate (SFR)-log mass diagram, our LAEs fall above the "main-sequence" defined by z ~ 3 continuum selected star-forming galaxies. In this respect, they are similar to sub-mm-selected galaxies, although most LAEs have much lower mass.
  • This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.
  • Survey observations of the three-dimensional locations of galaxies are a powerful approach to measure the distribution of matter in the universe, which can be used to learn about the nature of dark energy, physics of inflation, neutrino masses, etc. A competitive survey, however, requires a large volume (e.g., Vsurvey is roughly 10 Gpc3) to be covered, and thus tends to be expensive. A "sparse sampling" method offers a more affordable solution to this problem: within a survey footprint covering a given survey volume, Vsurvey, we observe only a fraction of the volume. The distribution of observed regions should be chosen such that their separation is smaller than the length scale corresponding to the wavenumber of interest. Then one can recover the power spectrum of galaxies with precision expected for a survey covering a volume of Vsurvey (rather than the volume of the sum of observed regions) with the number density of galaxies given by the total number of observed galaxies divided by Vsurvey (rather than the number density of galaxies within an observed region). We find that regularly-spaced sampling yields an unbiased power spectrum with no window function effect, and deviations from regularly-spaced sampling, which are unavoidable in realistic surveys, introduce calculable window function effects and increase the uncertainties of the recovered power spectrum. While we discuss the sparse sampling method within the context of the forthcoming Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment, the method is general and can be applied to other galaxy surveys.
  • We present new results on the spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha (LyA) emission of three LyA emitting field galaxies at z~2.4 with high LyA equivalent width (>100 Angstroms) and LyA luminosity (~10^43 erg/s). At 120 km/s (FWHM) spectral resolution, the prominent double-peaked LyA profile straddles the systemic velocity, where the velocity zero-point is determined from spectroscopy of the galaxies' rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The average velocity offset from systemic of the stronger redshifted emission component for our sample is 176 km/s while the average total separation between the redshifted and main blueshifted emission components is 380 km/s. These measurements are a factor of ~2 smaller than for UV continuum-selected galaxies that show LyA in emission with lower LyA equivalent width. We compare our LyA spectra to the predicted line profiles of a spherical "expanding shell" LyA radiative transfer grid that models large-scale galaxy outflows. Specifically blueward of the systemic velocity where two galaxies show a weak, highly blueshifted (by ~1000 km/s) tertiary emission peak, the model line profiles are a relatively poor representation of the observed spectra. Since the neutral gas column density has a dominant influence over the shape of the LyA line profile, we caution against equating the observed LyA velocity offset with a physical outflow velocity, especially at lower spectral resolution where the unresolved LyA velocity offset is a convoluted function of several degenerate parameters. Referring to rest-frame ultraviolet and optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we find that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role in inducing a starburst that results in copious LyA emission, as well as perturbing the gas distribution and velocity field which have strong influence over the LyA emission line profile.
  • We report on extensive testing carried out on the optical fibers for the VIRUS instrument. The primary result of this work explores how 10+ years of simulated wear on a VIRUS fiber bundle affects both transmission and focal ratio degradation (FRD) of the optical fibers. During the accelerated lifetime tests we continuously monitored the fibers for signs of FRD. We find that transient FRD events were common during the portions of the tests when motion was at telescope slew rates, but dropped to negligible levels during rates of motion typical for science observation. Tests of fiber transmission and FRD conducted both before and after the lifetime tests reveal that while transmission values do not change over the 10+ years of simulated wear, a clear increase in FRD is seen in all 18 fibers tested. This increase in FRD is likely due to microfractures that develop over time from repeated flexure of the fiber bundle, and stands in contrast to the transient FRD events that stem from localized stress and subsequent modal diffusion of light within the fibers. There was no measurable wavelength dependence on the increase in FRD over 350 nm to 600 nm. We also report on bend radius tests conducted on individual fibers and find the 266 microns VIRUS fibers to be immune to bending-induced FRD at bend radii of R > 10cm. Below this bend radius FRD increases slightly with decreasing radius. Lastly, we give details of a degradation seen in the fiber bundle currently deployed on the Mitchell Spectrograph (formally VIRUS-P) at McDonald Observatory. The degradation is shown to be caused by a localized shear in a select number of optical fibers that leads to an explosive form of FRD. In a few fibers, the overall transmission loss through the instrument can exceed 80%.
  • We present an analysis of the luminosities and equivalent widths of the 284 z < 0.56 [O II]-emitting galaxies found in the 169 square arcmin pilot survey for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). By combining emission-line fluxes obtained from the Mitchell spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope with deep broadband photometry from archival data, we derive each galaxy's de-reddened [O II] 3727 luminosity and calculate its total star formation rate. We show that over the last ~5 Gyr of cosmic time there has been substantial evolution in the [O II] emission-line luminosity function, with L* decreasing by ~0.6 +/-0.2 dex in the observed function, and by ~0.9 +/-0.2 dex in the de-reddened relation. Accompanying this decline is a significant shift in the distribution of [O II] equivalent widths, with the fraction of high equivalent-width emitters declining dramatically with time. Overall, the data imply that the relative intensity of star formation within galaxies has decreased over the past ~5 Gyr, and that the star formation rate density of the universe has declined by a factor of ~2.5 between z ~ 0.5 and z ~ 0. These observations represent the first [O II]-based star formation rate density measurements in this redshift range, and foreshadow the advancements which will be generated by the main HETDEX survey.
  • The Visible Integral Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) is an array of at least 150 copies of a simple, fiber-fed integral field spectrograph that will be deployed on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) to carry out the HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). Each spectrograph contains a volume phase holographic grating as its dispersing element that is used in first order for 350 nm to 550 nm. We discuss the test methods used to evaluate the performance of the prototype gratings, which have aided in modifying the fabrication prescription for achieving the specified batch diffraction efficiency required for HETDEX. In particular, we discuss tests in which we measure the diffraction efficiency at the nominal grating angle of incidence in VIRUS for all orders accessible to our test bench that are allowed by the grating equation. For select gratings, these tests have allowed us to account for > 90% of the incident light for wavelengths within the spectral coverage of VIRUS. The remaining light that is unaccounted for is likely being diffracted into reflective orders or being absorbed or scattered within the grating layer (for bluer wavelengths especially, the latter term may dominate the others). Finally, we discuss an apparatus that will be used to quickly verify the first order diffraction efficiency specification for the batch of at least 150 VIRUS production gratings.
  • We present surface photometry of a giant, low surface brightness stellar arc in the halo of the nearby spiral galaxy M63 (NGC 5055) that is consistent with being a part of a stellar stream resulting from the disruption of a dwarf satellite galaxy. Using the stream's "great-circle" morphology and its photometric properties, we estimate that the stream originates from the accretion of a 10^8 M_sun satellite in the last few Gyr. The B-R color of the stream's stars is consistent with Local Group dwarfs and is also similar to the outer regions of M63's disk and stellar halo within our measurement uncertainties. Additionally, we identify several other low surface brightness features that may be related to the galaxy's complex spiral structure or may be tidal debris associated with the disruption of the galaxy's outer stellar disk as a result of the accretion event. Using our deep, panoramic optical view of M63 with additional existing multiwavelength data, we describe the possible effects of such an accretion event in the larger picture of the parent galaxy.
  • We study the mass distribution in the late-type dwarf galaxy NGC 2976 through stellar kinematics obtained with the VIRUS-P integral-field spectrograph and anisotropic Jeans models as a test of cosmological simulations and baryonic processes that putatively alter small-scale structure. Previous measurements of the H-alpha emission-line kinematics have determined that the dark matter halo of NGC 2976 is most consistent with a cored density profile. We find that the stellar kinematics are best fit with a cuspy halo. Cored dark matter halo fits are only consistent with the stellar kinematics if the stellar mass-to-light ratio is significantly larger than that derived from stellar population synthesis, while the best-fitting cuspy model has no such conflict. The inferred mass distribution from a harmonic decomposition of the gaseous kinematics is inconsistent with that of the stellar kinematics. This difference is likely due to the gas disk not meeting the assumptions that underlie the analysis such as no pressure support, a constant kinematic axis, and planar orbits. By relaxing some of these assumptions, in particular the form of the kinematic axis with radius, the gas-derived solution can be made consistent with the stellar kinematic models. A strong kinematic twist in the gas of NGC 2976's center suggests caution, and we advance the mass model based on the stellar kinematics as more reliable. The analysis of this first galaxy shows promising evidence that dark matter halos in late-type dwarfs may in fact be more consistent with cuspy dark matter distributions than earlier work has claimed.
  • We present surface photometry of a very faint, giant arc feature in the halo of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5055 (M63) that is consistent with being a part of a stellar stream resulting from the disruption of a dwarf satellite galaxy. This faint feature was first detected in early photographic studies by van der Kruit (1979); more recently by Mart\'inez-Delgado et al. (2010) and as presented in this work, the loop has been realized to be the result of a recent minor merger through evidence obtained by deep images taken with a telescope of only 0.16 m aperture. The stellar stream is confirmed in additional images taken with the 0.5 m of the BlackBird Remote Observatory and the 0.8 m of the McDonald Observatory. This low surface brightness structure around the disk of the galaxy extends ~29 kpc from its center, with a projected width of 3.3 kpc. The stream's morphology is consistent with that of the visible part of a "great-circle" stellar stream originating from the accretion of a ~10^8 M_sun dwarf satellite in the last few Gyr. The progenitor satellite's current position and fate are not conclusive from our data. The color of the stream's stars is consistent with Local Group dwarfs and is similar to the outer regions of M63's disk and stellar halo. We detect other low surface brightness "plumes"; some of these may be extended spiral features related to the galaxy's complex spiral structure and others may be tidal debris associated with the disruption of the galaxy's outer stellar disk as a result of the accretion event. We differentiate between features related to the tidal stream and faint, blue features in the outskirts of the galaxy's disk previously detected by the GALEX satellite. With its highly warped HI gaseous disk (~20 deg), M63 represents one of several examples of an isolated spiral galaxy with a warped disk showing strong evidence of an ongoing minor merger.
  • We study the escape of Ly-alpha photons from Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) and the overall galaxy population using a sample of 99 LAEs at 1.9<z<3.8 detected through integral-field spectroscopy of blank fields by the HETDEX Pilot Survey. For 89 LAEs showing counterparts in deep broad-band images we measure the rest-frame UV luminosity and the UV slope, which we use to estimate E(B-V) under the assumption of a constant intrinsic UV slope for LAEs. These two quantities are used to measure the dust-corrected star formation rate (SFR). A comparison between the observed Ly-alpha luminosity and that predicted by the dust-corrected SFR yields the Ly-alpha escape fraction. We also measure the Ly-alpha luminosity function. Integration of the luminosity function provides a measurement of the Ly-alpha luminosity density across our redshift range. We combine our data with that from other surveys at 0.3<z<7.7 to trace the evolution of the Ly-alpha luminosity density. We then compare it to that expected from the star-formation history of the universe in order to characterize the evolution of the Ly-alpha escape fraction of the overall galaxy population [abriged]
  • We present new integral-field spectroscopy in the outskirts of two nearby, edge-on, late-type galaxies to search for the H-alpha emission that is expected from the exposure of their hydrogen gas to the metagalactic ultraviolet background (UVB). Despite the sensitivity of the VIRUS-P spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7m telescope to low surface brightness emission and the large field-of-view, we do not detect H-alpha to 5 sigma upper limits of 6.4 x 10^(-19) erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 in UGC 7321 and of 25 x 10^(-19) erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 in UGC 1281 in each of the hundreds of independent spatial elements (fibers). We fit gas distribution models from overlapping 21 cm data of HI, extrapolate one scale length beyond the HI data, and estimate predicted H-alpha surface brightness maps. We analyze three types of limits from the data with stacks formed from increasingly large spatial regions and compare to the model predictions: 1) single fibers, 2) convolution of the fiber grid with a Gaussian, circular kernel (10\arcsec\ full width half maximum), and 3) the coadded spectra from a few hundred fibers over the brightest model regions. None of these methods produce a significant detection (>5 sigma) with the most stringent constraints on the HI photoionization rate of Gamma(z=0)<1.7 x 10^(-14) s^(-1) in UGC 7321 and Gamma(z=0)<14 x 10^(-14) s^(-1) in UGC 1281. The UGC 7321 limit is below previous measurement limits and also below current theoretical models. Restricting the analysis to the fibers bound by the HI data leads to a comparable limit; the limit is Gamma(z=0)<2.3 x 10^(-14) s^(-1) in UGC 7321. We discuss how a low Lyman limit escape fraction in z~0 redshift star forming galaxies might explain this lower than predicted UVB strength and the prospects of deeper data to make a direct detection.
  • We present a catalog of emission-line galaxies selected solely by their emission-line fluxes using a wide-field integral field spectrograph. This work is partially motivated as a pilot survey for the upcoming Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We describe the observations, reductions, detections, redshift classifications, line fluxes, and counterpart information for 397 emission-line galaxies detected over 169 sq.arcmin with a 3500-5800 Ang. bandpass under 5 Ang. full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) spectral resolution. The survey's best sensitivity for unresolved objects under photometric conditions is between 4-20 E-17 erg/s/sq.cm depending on the wavelength, and Ly-alpha luminosities between 3-6 E42 erg/s are detectable. This survey method complements narrowband and color-selection techniques in the search for high redshift galaxies with its different selection properties and large volume probed. The four survey fields within the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS, and XMM-LSS areas are rich with existing, complementary data. We find 104 galaxies via their high redshift Ly-alpha emission at 1.9<z<3.8, and the majority of the remainder objects are low redshift [OII]3727 emitters at z<0.56. The classification between low and high redshift objects depends on rest frame equivalent width, as well as other indicators, where available. Based on matches to X-ray catalogs, the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fraction amongst the Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) is 6%. We also analyze the survey's completeness and contamination properties through simulations. We find five high-z, highly-significant, resolved objects with full-width-half-maximum sizes >44 sq.arcsec which appear to be extended Ly-alpha nebulae. We also find three high-z objects with rest frame Ly-alpha equivalent widths above the level believed to be achievable with normal star formation, EW(rest)>240 Ang.
  • We present observations at 1.2 mm with MAMBO-II of a sample of z>~2 radio-intermediate obscured quasars, as well as CO observations of two sources with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Five out of 21 sources (24%) are detected at a significance of >=3sigma. Stacking all sources leads to a statistical detection of <S_1.2mm>= 0.96+-0.11 mJy and stacking only the non-detections also yields a statistical detection, with <S_1.2mm>= 0.51+-0.13 mJy. This corresponds to a typical far-infrared luminosity L_FIR~4x10^12 Lsol. If the far-infrared luminosity is powered entirely by star-formation, and not by AGN-heated dust, then the characteristic inferred star-formation rate is ~700 Msol yr-1. This far-infrared luminosity implies a dust mass of M_dust~3x10^8 Msol. We estimate that such large dust masses on kpc scales can plausibly cause the obscuration of the quasars. We present dust SEDs for our sample and derive a mean SED for our sample. This mean SED is not well fitted by clumpy torus models, unless additional extinction and far-infrared re-emission due to cool dust are included. There is a hint that the host galaxies of obscured quasars must have higher far-infrared luminosities and cool-dust masses and are therefore often found at an earlier evolutionary phase than those of unobscured quasars. For one source at z=2.767, we detect the CO(3-2) transition, with S_CO Delta nu=630+-50 mJy km s-1, corresponding to L_CO(3-2)= 3.2x10^7 Lsol, or L'_CO(3-2)=2.4x10^10 K km s-1 pc2. For another source at z=4.17, the lack of detection of the CO(4-3) line yields a limit of L'_CO(4-3)<1x10^10 K km s-1 pc2. Molecular gas masses, gas depletion timescales and gas-to-dust ratios are estimated (Abridged).
  • We present optical spectroscopy, near-infrared (mostly K-band) and radio (151-MHz and 1.4-GHz) imaging of the first complete region (TOOT00) of the TexOx-1000 (TOOT) redshift survey of radio sources. The 0.0015-sr (~ 5 deg^2) TOOT00 region is selected from pointed observations of the Cambridge Low-Frequency Survey Telescope at 151 MHz at a flux density limit of ~= 100 mJy, ~ 5-times fainter than the 7C Redshift Survey (7CRS), and contains 47 radio sources. We have obtained 40 spectroscopic redshifts (~ 85% completeness). Adding redshifts estimated for the 7 other cases yields a median redshift z_med ~ 1.25. We find a significant population of objects with FRI-like radio structures at radio luminosities above both the low-redshift FRI/II break and the break in the radio luminosity function. The redshift distribution and sub-populations of TOOT00 are broadly consistent with extrapolations from the 7CRS/6CE/3CRR datasets underlying the SKADS Simulated Skies Semi-Empirical Extragalactic Database, S^3-SEX.
  • We have used the visible integral-field replicable unit spectrograph prototype (VIRUS-P), a new integral field spectrograph, to study the spatially and spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha emission line structure in the radio galaxy B2 0902+34 at z=3.4. We observe a halo of Lyman-alpha emission with a velocity dispersion of 250 km/s extending to a radius of 50 kpc. A second feature is revealed in a spatially resolved region where the line profile shows blueshifted structure. This may be viewed as either HI absorption at -450 km/s or secondary emission at -900 km/s from the primary peak. Our new data, in combination with the 21 cm absorption, suggest two important and unexplained discrepancies. First, nowhere in the line profiles of the Lyman-alpha halo is the 21 cm absorber population evident. Second, the 21 cm absorption redshift is higher than the Lyman-alpha emission redshift. In an effort to explain these two traits, we have undertaken the first three dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of resonant scattering in radio galaxies. Though simple, the model produces the features in the Lyman-alpha data and predicts the 21 cm properties. To reach agreement between this model and the data, global infall of the HI is strictly necessary. The amount of gas necessary to match the model and data is surprisingly high, >= 10E12 solar masses, an order of magnitude larger than the stellar mass. The collapsing structure and large gas mass lead us to interpret B2 0902+34 as a protogiant elliptical galaxy.
  • We present the first results of a wide field survey for cool brown dwarfs with the MegaCam camera on the CFHT telescope, the Canada-France Brown Dwarf Survey, hereafter CFBDS. Our objectives are to find ultracool brown dwarfs and to constrain the field-brown dwarf mass function thanks to a larger sample of L and T dwarfs. We identify candidates in CFHT/MegaCam i' and z' images using optimised psf-fitting within Source Extractor, and follow them up with pointed near-infrared imaging on several telescopes. We have so far analysed over 350 square degrees and found 770 brown dwarf candidates brighter than z'{AB}=22.5. We currently have J-band photometry for 220 of these candidates, which confirms 37% as potential L or T dwarfs. Some are among the reddest and farthest brown dwarfs currently known, including an independent identification of the recently published ULAS J003402.77-005206.7 and the discovery of a second brown dwarf later than T8, CFBDS J005910.83-011401.3. Infrared spectra of three T dwarf candidates confirm their nature, and validate the selection process. The completed survey will discover ~100 T dwarfs and ~500 L dwarfs or M dwarfs later than M8, approximately doubling the number of currently known brown dwarfs. The resulting sample will have a very well-defined selection function, and will therefore produce a very clean luminosity function.