• Motivated by recent concerns that queuing delays in the Internet are on the rise, we conduct a performance evaluation of Compound TCP (C-TCP) in two topologies: a single bottleneck and a multi-bottleneck topology, under different traffic scenarios. The first topology consists of a single bottleneck router, and the second consists of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by two edge routers, feeding into a common core router. We focus on some dynamical and statistical properties of the underlying system. From a dynamical perspective, we develop fluid models in a regime wherein the number of flows is large, bandwidth-delay product is high, buffers are dimensioned small (independent of the bandwidth-delay product) and routers deploy a Drop-Tail queue policy. A detailed local stability analysis for these models yields the following key insight: smaller buffers favour stability. Additionally, we highlight that larger buffers, in addition to increasing latency, are prone to inducing limit cycles in the system dynamics, via a Hopf bifurcation. These limit cycles in turn cause synchronisation among the TCP flows, and also result in a loss of link utilisation. For the topologies considered, we also empirically analyse some statistical properties of the bottleneck queues. These statistical analyses serve to validate an important modelling assumption: that in the regime considered, each bottleneck queue may be approximated as either an $M/M/1/B$ or an $M/D/1/B$ queue. This immediately makes the modelling perspective attractive and the analysis tractable. Finally, we show that smaller buffers, in addition to ensuring stability and low latency, would also yield fairly good system performance, in terms of throughput and flow completion times.
  • Reaction delays play an important role in determining the qualitative dynamical properties of a platoon of vehicles traversing a straight road. In this paper, we investigate the impact of delayed feedback on the dynamics of the Classical Car-Following Model (CCFM). Specifically, we analyze the CCFM in no delay, small delay and arbitrary delay regimes. First, we derive a sufficient condition for local stability of the CCFM in no-delay and small-delay regimes using. Next, we derive the necessary and sufficient condition for local stability of the CCFM for an arbitrary delay. We then demonstrate that the transition of traffic flow from the locally stable to the unstable regime occurs via a Hopf bifurcation, thus resulting in limit cycles in system dynamics. Physically, these limit cycles manifest as back-propagating congestion waves on highways. In the context of human-driven vehicles, our work provides phenomenological insight into the impact of reaction delays on the emergence and evolution of traffic congestion. In the context of self-driven vehicles, our work has the potential to provide design guidelines for control algorithms running in self-driven cars to avoid undesirable phenomena. Specifically, designing control algorithms that avoid jerky vehicular movements is essential. Hence, we derive the necessary and sufficient condition for non-oscillatory convergence of the CCFM. Next, we characterize the rate of convergence of the CCFM, and bring forth the interplay between local stability, non-oscillatory convergence and the rate of convergence of the CCFM. Further, to better understand the oscillations in the system dynamics, we characterize the type of the Hopf bifurcation and the asymptotic orbital stability of the limit cycles using Poincare normal forms and the center manifold theory. The analysis is complemented with stability charts, bifurcation diagrams and MATLAB simulations.
  • We conduct a preliminary investigation into the levels of congestion in New Delhi, motivated by concerns due to rapidly growing vehicular congestion in Indian cities. First, we provide statistical evidence for the rising congestion levels on the roads of New Delhi from taxi GPS traces. Then, we estimate the economic costs of congestion in New Delhi. In particular, we estimate the marginal and the total costs of congestion. In calculating the marginal costs, we consider the following factors: (i) productivity loss, (ii) air pollution costs, and (iii) costs due to accidents. In calculating the total costs, in addition to the above factors, we also estimate the costs due to the wastage of fuel. We also project the associated costs due to productivity loss and air pollution till 2030. The projected traffic congestion costs for New Delhi comes around 14658 million US$/yr for the year 2030. The key takeaway from our current study is that costs due to productivity loss, particularly from buses, dominates the overall economic costs. Additionally, the expected increase in fuel wastage makes a strong case for intelligent traffic management systems.
  • Reaction delays are important in determining the qualitative dynamical properties of a platoon of vehicles traveling on a straight road. In this paper, we investigate the impact of delayed feedback on the dynamics of the Modified Optimal Velocity Model (MOVM). Specifically, we analyze the MOVM in three regimes -- no delay, small delay and arbitrary delay. In the absence of reaction delays, we show that the MOVM is locally stable. For small delays, we then derive a sufficient condition for the MOVM to be locally stable. Next, for an arbitrary delay, we derive the necessary and sufficient condition for the local stability of the MOVM. We show that the traffic flow transits from the locally stable to the locally unstable regime via a Hopf bifurcation. We also derive the necessary and sufficient condition for non-oscillatory convergence and characterize the rate of convergence of the MOVM. These conditions help ensure smooth traffic flow, good ride quality and quick equilibration to the uniform flow. Further, since a Hopf bifurcation results in the emergence of limit cycles, we provide an analytical framework to characterize the type of the Hopf bifurcation and the asymptotic orbital stability of the resulting non-linear oscillations. Finally, we corroborate our analyses using stability charts, bifurcation diagrams, numerical computations and simulations conducted using MATLAB.
  • We conduct a local stability and Hopf bifurcation analysis for Compound TCP, with small Drop-tail buffers, in three topologies. The first topology consists of two sets of TCP flows having different round trip times, and feeding into a core router. The second topology corresponds to two queues in tandem, and consists of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by a single edge router and feeding into a core router. The third topology comprises of two distinct sets of TCP flows, regulated by two separate edge routers, and feeding into a common core router. For each of these cases, we conduct a detailed local stability analysis and obtain conditions on the network and protocol parameters to ensure stability. If these conditions get marginally violated, our analysis shows that the underlying systems would lose local stability via a Hopf bifurcation. After exhibiting a Hopf, a key concern is to determine the asymptotic orbital stability of the bifurcating limit cycles. We present a detailed analytical framework to address the stability of the limit cycles, and the type of the Hopf bifurcation by invoking Poincare normal forms and the center manifold theory. We conduct packet-level simulations to highlight the existence and stability of the limit cycles in the queue size dynamics.
  • In this note we analyse various stability properties of the max-min fair Rate Control Protocol (RCP) operating with small buffers. We first tackle the issue of stability for networks with arbitrary topologies. We prove that the max-min fair RCP fluid model is globally stable in the absence of propagation delays, and also derive a set of conditions for local stability when arbitrary heterogeneous propagation delays are present. The network delay stability result assumes that, at equilibrium, there is only one bottleneck link along each route. Lastly, in the simpler setting of a single link, single delay model, we investigate the impact of the loss of local stability via a Hopf bifurcation.