• We study high-dimensional distribution learning in an agnostic setting where an adversary is allowed to arbitrarily corrupt an $\varepsilon$-fraction of the samples. Such questions have a rich history spanning statistics, machine learning and theoretical computer science. Even in the most basic settings, the only known approaches are either computationally inefficient or lose dimension-dependent factors in their error guarantees. This raises the following question:Is high-dimensional agnostic distribution learning even possible, algorithmically? In this work, we obtain the first computationally efficient algorithms with dimension-independent error guarantees for agnostically learning several fundamental classes of high-dimensional distributions: (1) a single Gaussian, (2) a product distribution on the hypercube, (3) mixtures of two product distributions (under a natural balancedness condition), and (4) mixtures of spherical Gaussians. Our algorithms achieve error that is independent of the dimension, and in many cases scales nearly-linearly with the fraction of adversarially corrupted samples. Moreover, we develop a general recipe for detecting and correcting corruptions in high-dimensions, that may be applicable to many other problems.
  • Given samples from an unknown multivariate distribution $p$, is it possible to distinguish whether $p$ is the product of its marginals versus $p$ being far from every product distribution? Similarly, is it possible to distinguish whether $p$ equals a given distribution $q$ versus $p$ and $q$ being far from each other? These problems of testing independence and goodness-of-fit have received enormous attention in statistics, information theory, and theoretical computer science, with sample-optimal algorithms known in several interesting regimes of parameters. Unfortunately, it has also been understood that these problems become intractable in large dimensions, necessitating exponential sample complexity. Motivated by the exponential lower bounds for general distributions as well as the ubiquity of Markov Random Fields (MRFs) in the modeling of high-dimensional distributions, we initiate the study of distribution testing on structured multivariate distributions, and in particular the prototypical example of MRFs: the Ising Model. We demonstrate that, in this structured setting, we can avoid the curse of dimensionality, obtaining sample and time efficient testers for independence and goodness-of-fit. One of the key technical challenges we face along the way is bounding the variance of functions of the Ising model.
  • A recent model for property testing of probability distributions (Chakraborty et al., ITCS 2013, Canonne et al., SICOMP 2015) enables tremendous savings in the sample complexity of testing algorithms, by allowing them to condition the sampling on subsets of the domain. In particular, Canonne, Ron, and Servedio (SICOMP 2015) showed that, in this setting, testing identity of an unknown distribution $D$ (whether $D=D^\ast$ for an explicitly known $D^\ast$) can be done with a constant number of queries, independent of the support size $n$ -- in contrast to the required $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ in the standard sampling model. It was unclear whether the same stark contrast exists for the case of testing equivalence, where both distributions are unknown. While Canonne et al. established a $\mathrm{poly}(\log n)$-query upper bound for equivalence testing, very recently brought down to $\tilde O(\log\log n)$ by Falahatgar et al. (COLT 2015), whether a dependence on the domain size $n$ is necessary was still open, and explicitly posed by Fischer at the Bertinoro Workshop on Sublinear Algorithms (2014). We show that any testing algorithm for equivalence must make $\Omega(\sqrt{\log\log n})$ queries in the conditional sampling model. This demonstrates a gap between identity and equivalence testing, absent in the standard sampling model (where both problems have sampling complexity $n^{\Theta(1)}$). We also obtain results on the query complexity of uniformity testing and support-size estimation with conditional samples. We answer a question of Chakraborty et al. (ITCS 2013) showing that non-adaptive uniformity testing indeed requires $\Omega(\log n)$ queries in the conditional model. For the related problem of support-size estimation, we provide both adaptive and non-adaptive algorithms, with query complexities $\mathrm{poly}(\log\log n)$ and $\mathrm{poly}(\log n)$, respectively.
  • We design nearly optimal differentially private algorithms for learning two fundamental families of high-dimensional distributions in total variation distance: multivariate Gaussians in $\mathbb{R}^{d}$ and product distributions on the hypercube. The sample complexity of both our algorithms approaches the sample complexity of non-private learners up to a small multiplicative factor and an additional additive term that is lower order for a wide range of parameters, showing that privacy comes essentially for free for these problems. Our algorithms use a novel technical approach to reducing the sensitivity of the estimation procedure that we call recursive private preconditioning and may find additional applications.
  • Robust estimation is much more challenging in high dimensions than it is in one dimension: Most techniques either lead to intractable optimization problems or estimators that can tolerate only a tiny fraction of errors. Recent work in theoretical computer science has shown that, in appropriate distributional models, it is possible to robustly estimate the mean and covariance with polynomial time algorithms that can tolerate a constant fraction of corruptions, independent of the dimension. However, the sample and time complexity of these algorithms is prohibitively large for high-dimensional applications. In this work, we address both of these issues by establishing sample complexity bounds that are optimal, up to logarithmic factors, as well as giving various refinements that allow the algorithms to tolerate a much larger fraction of corruptions. Finally, we show on both synthetic and real data that our algorithms have state-of-the-art performance and suddenly make high-dimensional robust estimation a realistic possibility.
  • In high dimensions, most machine learning methods are brittle to even a small fraction of structured outliers. To address this, we introduce a new meta-algorithm that can take in a base learner such as least squares or stochastic gradient descent, and harden the learner to be resistant to outliers. Our method, Sever, possesses strong theoretical guarantees yet is also highly scalable -- beyond running the base learner itself, it only requires computing the top singular vector of a certain $n \times d$ matrix. We apply Sever on a drug design dataset and a spam classification dataset, and find that in both cases it has substantially greater robustness than several baselines. On the spam dataset, with $1\%$ corruptions, we achieved $7.4\%$ test error, compared to $13.4\%-20.5\%$ for the baselines, and $3\%$ error on the uncorrupted dataset. Similarly, on the drug design dataset, with $10\%$ corruptions, we achieved $1.42$ mean-squared error test error, compared to $1.51$-$2.33$ for the baselines, and $1.23$ error on the uncorrupted dataset.
  • We develop differentially private methods for estimating various distributional properties. Given a sample from a discrete distribution $p$, some functional $f$, and accuracy and privacy parameters $\alpha$ and $\varepsilon$, the goal is to estimate $f(p)$ up to accuracy $\alpha$, while maintaining $\varepsilon$-differential privacy of the sample. We prove almost-tight bounds on the sample size required for this problem for several functionals of interest, including support size, support coverage, and entropy. We show that the cost of privacy is negligible in a variety of settings, both theoretically and experimentally. Our methods are based on a sensitivity analysis of several state-of-the-art methods for estimating these properties with sublinear sample complexities.
  • A generative model may generate utter nonsense when it is fit to maximize the likelihood of observed data. This happens due to "model error," i.e., when the true data generating distribution does not fit within the class of generative models being learned. To address this, we propose a model of active distribution learning using a binary invalidity oracle that identifies some examples as clearly invalid, together with random positive examples sampled from the true distribution. The goal is to maximize the likelihood of the positive examples subject to the constraint of (almost) never generating examples labeled invalid by the oracle. Guarantees are agnostic compared to a class of probability distributions. We show that, while proper learning often requires exponentially many queries to the invalidity oracle, improper distribution learning can be done using polynomially many queries.
  • We prove near-tight concentration of measure for polynomial functions of the Ising model under high temperature. For any degree $d$, we show that a degree-$d$ polynomial of a $n$-spin Ising model exhibits exponential tails that scale as $\exp(-r^{2/d})$ at radius $r=\tilde{\Omega}_d(n^{d/2})$. Our concentration radius is optimal up to logarithmic factors for constant $d$, improving known results by polynomial factors in the number of spins. We demonstrate the efficacy of polynomial functions as statistics for testing the strength of interactions in social networks in both synthetic and real world data.
  • Given samples from an unknown distribution $p$ and a description of a distribution $q$, are $p$ and $q$ close or far? This question of "identity testing" has received significant attention in the case of testing whether $p$ and $q$ are equal or far in total variation distance. However, in recent work, the following questions have been been critical to solving problems at the frontiers of distribution testing: -Alternative Distances: Can we test whether $p$ and $q$ are far in other distances, say Hellinger? -Robustness: Can we test when $p$ and $q$ are close, rather than equal? And if so, close in which distances? Motivated by these questions, we characterize the complexity of distribution testing under a variety of distances, including total variation, $\ell_2$, Hellinger, Kullback-Leibler, and chi-squared. For each pair of distances $d_1$ and $d_2$, we study the complexity of testing if $p$ and $q$ are close in $d_1$ versus far in $d_2$, with a focus on identifying which problems allow strongly sublinear testers (i.e., those with complexity $O(n^{1 - \gamma})$ for some $\gamma > 0$ where $n$ is the size of the support of the distributions $p$ and $q$). We provide matching upper and lower bounds for each case. We also study these questions in the case where we only have samples from $q$ (equivalence testing), showing qualitative differences from identity testing in terms of when robustness can be achieved. Our algorithms fall into the classical paradigm of chi-squared statistics, but require crucial changes to handle the challenges introduced by each distance we consider. Finally, we survey other recent results in an attempt to serve as a reference for the complexity of various distribution testing problems.
  • We develop differentially private hypothesis testing methods for the small sample regime. Given a sample $\cal D$ from a categorical distribution $p$ over some domain $\Sigma$, an explicitly described distribution $q$ over $\Sigma$, some privacy parameter $\varepsilon$, accuracy parameter $\alpha$, and requirements $\beta_{\rm I}$ and $\beta_{\rm II}$ for the type I and type II errors of our test, the goal is to distinguish between $p=q$ and $d_{\rm{TV}}(p,q) \geq \alpha$. We provide theoretical bounds for the sample size $|{\cal D}|$ so that our method both satisfies $(\varepsilon,0)$-differential privacy, and guarantees $\beta_{\rm I}$ and $\beta_{\rm II}$ type I and type II errors. We show that differential privacy may come for free in some regimes of parameters, and we always beat the sample complexity resulting from running the $\chi^2$-test with noisy counts, or standard approaches such as repetition for endowing non-private $\chi^2$-style statistics with differential privacy guarantees. We experimentally compare the sample complexity of our method to that of recently proposed methods for private hypothesis testing.
  • We study the fundamental problem of learning the parameters of a high-dimensional Gaussian in the presence of noise -- where an $\varepsilon$-fraction of our samples were chosen by an adversary. We give robust estimators that achieve estimation error $O(\varepsilon)$ in the total variation distance, which is optimal up to a universal constant that is independent of the dimension. In the case where just the mean is unknown, our robustness guarantee is optimal up to a factor of $\sqrt{2}$ and the running time is polynomial in $d$ and $1/\epsilon$. When both the mean and covariance are unknown, the running time is polynomial in $d$ and quasipolynomial in $1/\varepsilon$. Moreover all of our algorithms require only a polynomial number of samples. Our work shows that the same sorts of error guarantees that were established over fifty years ago in the one-dimensional setting can also be achieved by efficient algorithms in high-dimensional settings.
  • An $(n,k)$-Poisson Multinomial Distribution (PMD) is the distribution of the sum of $n$ independent random vectors supported on the set ${\cal B}_k=\{e_1,\ldots,e_k\}$ of standard basis vectors in $\mathbb{R}^k$. We show that any $(n,k)$-PMD is ${\rm poly}\left({k\over \sigma}\right)$-close in total variation distance to the (appropriately discretized) multi-dimensional Gaussian with the same first two moments, removing the dependence on $n$ from the Central Limit Theorem of Valiant and Valiant. Interestingly, our CLT is obtained by bootstrapping the Valiant-Valiant CLT itself through the structural characterization of PMDs shown in recent work by Daskalakis, Kamath, and Tzamos. In turn, our stronger CLT can be leveraged to obtain an efficient PTAS for approximate Nash equilibria in anonymous games, significantly improving the state of the art, and matching qualitatively the running time dependence on $n$ and $1/\varepsilon$ of the best known algorithm for two-strategy anonymous games. Our new CLT also enables the construction of covers for the set of $(n,k)$-PMDs, which are proper and whose size is shown to be essentially optimal. Our cover construction combines our CLT with the Shapley-Folkman theorem and recent sparsification results for Laplacian matrices by Batson, Spielman, and Srivastava. Our cover size lower bound is based on an algebraic geometric construction. Finally, leveraging the structural properties of the Fourier spectrum of PMDs we show that these distributions can be learned from $O_k(1/\varepsilon^2)$ samples in ${\rm poly}_k(1/\varepsilon)$-time, removing the quasi-polynomial dependence of the running time on $1/\varepsilon$ from the algorithm of Daskalakis, Kamath, and Tzamos.
  • Given samples from an unknown distribution $p$, is it possible to distinguish whether $p$ belongs to some class of distributions $\mathcal{C}$ versus $p$ being far from every distribution in $\mathcal{C}$? This fundamental question has received tremendous attention in statistics, focusing primarily on asymptotic analysis, and more recently in information theory and theoretical computer science, where the emphasis has been on small sample size and computational complexity. Nevertheless, even for basic properties of distributions such as monotonicity, log-concavity, unimodality, independence, and monotone-hazard rate, the optimal sample complexity is unknown. We provide a general approach via which we obtain sample-optimal and computationally efficient testers for all these distribution families. At the core of our approach is an algorithm which solves the following problem: Given samples from an unknown distribution $p$, and a known distribution $q$, are $p$ and $q$ close in $\chi^2$-distance, or far in total variation distance? The optimality of our testers is established by providing matching lower bounds with respect to both $n$ and $\varepsilon$. Finally, a necessary building block for our testers and an important byproduct of our work are the first known computationally efficient proper learners for discrete log-concave and monotone hazard rate distributions.
  • An $(n,k)$-Poisson Multinomial Distribution (PMD) is the distribution of the sum of $n$ independent random vectors supported on the set ${\cal B}_k=\{e_1,\ldots,e_k\}$ of standard basis vectors in $\mathbb{R}^k$. We prove a structural characterization of these distributions, showing that, for all $\varepsilon >0$, any $(n, k)$-Poisson multinomial random vector is $\varepsilon$-close, in total variation distance, to the sum of a discretized multidimensional Gaussian and an independent $(\text{poly}(k/\varepsilon), k)$-Poisson multinomial random vector. Our structural characterization extends the multi-dimensional CLT of Valiant and Valiant, by simultaneously applying to all approximation requirements $\varepsilon$. In particular, it overcomes factors depending on $\log n$ and, importantly, the minimum eigenvalue of the PMD's covariance matrix from the distance to a multidimensional Gaussian random variable. We use our structural characterization to obtain an $\varepsilon$-cover, in total variation distance, of the set of all $(n, k)$-PMDs, significantly improving the cover size of Daskalakis and Papadimitriou, and obtaining the same qualitative dependence of the cover size on $n$ and $\varepsilon$ as the $k=2$ cover of Daskalakis and Papadimitriou. We further exploit this structure to show that $(n,k)$-PMDs can be learned to within $\varepsilon$ in total variation distance from $\tilde{O}_k(1/\varepsilon^2)$ samples, which is near-optimal in terms of dependence on $\varepsilon$ and independent of $n$. In particular, our result generalizes the single-dimensional result of Daskalakis, Diakonikolas, and Servedio for Poisson Binomials to arbitrary dimension.
  • We provide an algorithm for properly learning mixtures of two single-dimensional Gaussians without any separability assumptions. Given $\tilde{O}(1/\varepsilon^2)$ samples from an unknown mixture, our algorithm outputs a mixture that is $\varepsilon$-close in total variation distance, in time $\tilde{O}(1/\varepsilon^5)$. Our sample complexity is optimal up to logarithmic factors, and significantly improves upon both Kalai et al., whose algorithm has a prohibitive dependence on $1/\varepsilon$, and Feldman et al., whose algorithm requires bounds on the mixture parameters and depends pseudo-polynomially in these parameters. One of our main contributions is an improved and generalized algorithm for selecting a good candidate distribution from among competing hypotheses. Namely, given a collection of $N$ hypotheses containing at least one candidate that is $\varepsilon$-close to an unknown distribution, our algorithm outputs a candidate which is $O(\varepsilon)$-close to the distribution. The algorithm requires ${O}(\log{N}/\varepsilon^2)$ samples from the unknown distribution and ${O}(N \log N/\varepsilon^2)$ time, which improves previous such results (such as the Scheff\'e estimator) from a quadratic dependence of the running time on $N$ to quasilinear. Given the wide use of such results for the purpose of hypothesis selection, our improved algorithm implies immediate improvements to any such use.
  • We analyze the Schelling model of segregation in which a society of n individuals live in a ring. Each individual is one of two races and is only satisfied with his location so long as at least half his 2w nearest neighbors are of the same race as him. In the dynamics, randomly-chosen unhappy individuals successively swap locations. We consider the average size of monochromatic neighborhoods in the final stable state. Our analysis is the first rigorous analysis of the Schelling dynamics. We note that, in contrast to prior approximate analyses, the final state is nearly integrated: the average size of monochromatic neighborhoods is independent of n and polynomial in w.