• Satellite based quantum communication has been proven as a feasible way to achieve global scale quantum communication network. Very recently, a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite has been launched for this purpose. However, with a single satellite, it takes an inefficient 3-day period to provide the worldwide connectivity. On the other hand, similar to how the Iridium system functions in classic communication, satellite constellation (SC) composed of many quantum satellites, could provide global real-time quantum communication. In such a SC, most of the satellites will work in sunlight. Unfortunately, none of previous ground testing experiments could be implemented at daytime. During daytime, the bright sunlight background prohibits quantum communication in transmission over long distances. In this letter, by choosing a working wavelength of 1550 nm and developing free-space single-mode fibre coupling technology and ultralow noise up-conversion single photon detectors, we overcome the noise due to sunlight and demonstrate a 53-km free space quantum key distribution (QKD) in the daytime through a 48-dB loss channel. Our system not only shows the feasibility of satellite based quantum communication in daylight, but also has the ability to naturally adapt to ground fibre optics, representing an essential step towards a SC-based global quantum network.
  • We report a free-space entanglement-based quantum key distribution experiment, implementing the biased basis protocol between two sites which are 15.3 km apart. Photon pairs from a polarization-entangled source are distributed through two 7.8-km free-space optical links. An optimal bias 20:80 between the X and Z basis is used. A post-processing scheme with finite-key analysis is applied to extract the final secure key. After three-hour continuous operation at night, a 4293-bit secure key is obtained, with a final key rate of 0.124 bit per raw key bit which increases the final key rate by 14.8% comparing to the standard BB84 case. Our results experimentally demonstrate that the efficient BB84 protocol, which increases key generation efficiency by biasing Alice and Bob's basis choices, is potentially useful for the ground-satellite quantum communication.
  • In the well-known EPR paper, Einstein et al. called the nonlocal correlation in quantum entanglement as `spooky action at a distance'. If the spooky action does exist, what is its speed? All previous experiments along this direction have locality loopholes and thus can be explained without having to invoke any `spooky action' at all. Here, we strictly closed the locality loopholes by observing a 12-hour continuous violation of Bell inequality and concluded that the lower bound speed of `spooky action' was four orders of magnitude of the speed of light if the Earth's speed in any inertial reference frame was less than 10^(-3) times of the speed of light.
  • Free-space quantum communication with satellites opens a promising avenue for global secure quantum network and large-scale test of quantum foundations. Recently, numerous experimental efforts have been carried out towards this ambitious goal. However, one essential step - transmitting single photons from the satellite to the ground with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at realistic environments - remains experimental challenging. Here, we report a direct experimental demonstration of the satellite-ground transmission of a quasi-single-photon source. In the experiment, single photons (~0.85 photon per pulse) are generated by reflecting weak laser pulses back to earth with a cube-corner retro-reflector on the satellite Champ, collected by a 600-mm diameter telescope at the ground station, and finally detected by single-photon counting modules (SPCMs) after 400-km free-space link transmission. With the help of high accuracy time synchronization, narrow receiver field-of-view (FOV) and high-repetition-rate pulses (76 MHz), a SNR of better than 16:1 is obtained, which is sufficient for a secure quantum key distribution. Our experimental results represent an important step towards satellite-ground quantum communication.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD), provides the only intrinsically unconditional secure method for communication based on principle of quantum mechanics. Compared with fiber-based demonstrations-, free-space links could provide the most appealing solution for much larger distance. Despite of significant efforts, so far all realizations rely on stationary sites. Justifications are therefore extremely crucial for applications via a typical Low Earth Orbit Satellite (LEOS). To achieve direct and full-scale verifications, we demonstrate here three independent experiments with a decoy-state QKD system overcoming all the demanding conditions. The system is operated in a moving platform through a turntable, a floating platform through a hot-air balloon, and a huge loss channel, respectively, for substantiating performances under rapid motion, attitude change, vibration, random movement of satellites and in high-loss regime. The experiments cover expanded ranges for all the leading parameters of LEOS. Our results pave the way towards ground-satellite QKD and global quantum communication network.
  • A long standing goal for quantum communication is to transfer a quantum state over arbitrary distances. Free-space quantum communication provides a promising solution towards this challenging goal. Here, through a 97-km free space channel, we demonstrate long distance quantum teleportation over a 35-53 dB loss one-link channel, and entanglement distribution over a 66-85 dB high-loss two-link channel. We achieve an average fidelity of {80.4(9)}% for teleporting six distinct initial states and observe the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality after distributing entanglement. Besides being of fundamental interest, our result represents a significant step towards a global quantum network. Moreover, the high-frequency and high-accuracy acquiring, pointing and tracking technique developed in our experiment provides an essential tool for future satellite-based quantum communication.
  • We present an experimental study of the collective dipole oscillation of a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap. Dynamics of the center-of-mass dipole oscillation is studied in a broad parameter region, as a function of spin-orbit coupling parameters as well as oscillation amplitude. Anharmonic properties beyond effective-mass approximation are revealed, such as amplitude-dependent frequency and finite oscillation frequency at place with divergent effective mass. These anharmonic behaviors agree quantitatively with variational wave-function calculations. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate a unique feature of spin-orbit coupled system predicted by a sum-rule approach, stating that spin polarization susceptibility--a static physical quantity--can be measured via dynamics of dipole oscillation. The divergence of polarization susceptibility is observed at the quantum phase transition that separates magnetic nonzero-momentum condensate from nonmagnetic zero-momentum phase. The good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results provides a bench mark for recently developed theoretical approaches.
  • Using ultra-bright sources of pure-state entangled photons from parametric down conversion, an eight-photon interferometer and post-selection detection, we demonstrate the ability to experimentally manipulate eight individual photons and report the creation of an eight-photon Schr\"odinger cat state with an observed fidelity of $0.708 \pm 0.016$.
  • Photonic entanglement source and quantum memory are two basic building blocks of linear-optical quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication. In the past decades, intensive researches have been carried out, and remarkable progress, particularly based on the spontaneous parametric down-converted (SPDC) entanglement source and atomic ensembles, has been achieved. Currently, an important task towards scalable quantum information processing (QIP) is to efficiently write and read entanglement generated from a SPDC source into and out of an atomic quantum memory. Here we report the first experimental realization of a quantum interface by building a 5 MHz frequency-uncorrelated SPDC source and reversibly mapping the generated entangled photons into and out of a remote optically thick cold atomic memory using electromagnetically induced transparency. The frequency correlation between the entangled photons is almost fully eliminated with a suitable pump pulse. The storage of a triggered single photon with arbitrary polarization is shown to reach an average fidelity of 92% for 200 ns storage time. Moreover, polarization-entangled photon pairs are prepared, and one of photons is stored in the atomic memory while the other keeps flying. The CHSH Bell's inequality is measured and violation is clearly observed for storage time up to 1 microsecond. This demonstrates the entanglement is stored and survives during the storage. Our work establishes a crucial element to implement scalable all-optical QIP, and thus presents a substantial progress in quantum information science.