• The challenge of controlling magnetism using electric fields raises fundamental questions and addresses technological needs such as low-dissipation magnetic memory. The recently reported two-dimensional (2D) magnets provide a new system for studying this problem owing to their unique magnetic properties. For instance, bilayer chromium triiodide (CrI3) behaves as a layered antiferromagnet with a magnetic field-driven metamagnetic transition. Here, we demonstrate electrostatic gate control of magnetism in CrI3 bilayers, probed by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy. At fixed magnetic fields near the metamagnetic transition, we realize voltage-controlled switching between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic states. At zero magnetic field, we demonstrate a time-reversal pair of layered antiferromagnetic states which exhibit spin-layer locking, leading to a remarkable linear dependence of their MOKE signals on gate voltage with opposite slopes. Our results pave the way for exploring new magnetoelectric phenomena and van der Waals spintronics based on 2D materials.
  • Excitons, Coulomb-bound electron and hole pairs, are elementary photo-excitations in semiconductors, that can couple directly to light through radiative relaxation. In contrast to these bright excitons, dark excitons X$\rm{_D}$ with anti-parallel electron spin polarization exist, with generally forbidden radiative emission. Because of their associated long lifetimes, these dark excitons are appealing candidates for quantum computing and opto-electronic devices. However, optical read-out and control of X$\rm{_D}$ states have remained a major challenge due to their decoupling from light. Here, we present a novel tip-enhanced nano-optical approach to precisely switch and programmably modulate the X$\rm{_D}$ emission even at room temperature. Using monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) WSe$\rm{_2}$ on a gold film as model system, we demonstrate ${\sim} 6 \times 10^5$-fold enhancement in dark exciton photoluminescence quantum yield. This is achieved by the unique coupling of the nano-optical antenna-tip to the dark exciton \textit{out-of-plane} optical dipole moment, with an extraordinary Purcell factor of $\ge 2 \times 10^3$ of the tip-sample nano-cavity. Compared to the necessity of cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields in conventional approaches, our work provides a new way to harness excitonic properties in low-dimensional semiconductors and new strategies for quantum opto-electronic devices.
  • CrCl3 is a layered insulator that undergoes a crystallographic phase transition below room temperature and orders antiferromagnetically at low temperature. Weak van der Waals bonding between the layers and ferromagnetic in-plane magnetic order make it a promising material for obtaining atomically thin magnets and creating van der Waals heterostructures. In this work we have grown crystals of CrCl3, revisited the structural and thermodynamic properties of the bulk material, and explored mechanical exfoliation of the crystals. We find two distinct anomalies in the heat capacity at 14 and 17 K confirming that the magnetic order develops in two stages on cooling, with ferromagnetic correlations forming before long range antiferromagnetic order develops between them. This scenario is supported by magnetization data. A magnetic phase diagram is constructed from the heat capacity and magnetization results. We also find an anomaly in the magnetic susceptibility at the crystallographic phase transition, indicating some coupling between the magnetism and the lattice. First principles calculations accounting for van der Waals interactions also indicate spin-lattice coupling, and find multiple nearly degenerate crystallographic and magnetic structures consistent with the experimental observations. Finally, we demonstrate that monolayer and few-layer CrCl3 specimens can be produced from the bulk crystals by exfoliation, providing a path for the study of heterostructures and magnetism in ultrathin crystals down to the monolayer limit.
  • Since the celebrated discovery of graphene, the family of two-dimensional (2D) materials has grown to encompass a broad range of electronic properties. Recent additions include spin-valley coupled semiconductors, Ising superconductors that can be tuned into a quantum metal, possible Mott insulators with tunable charge-density waves, and topological semi-metals with edge transport. Despite this progress, there is still no 2D crystal with intrinsic magnetism, which would be useful for many technologies such as sensing, information, and data storage. Theoretically, magnetic order is prohibited in the 2D isotropic Heisenberg model at finite temperatures by the Mermin-Wagner theorem. However, magnetic anisotropy removes this restriction and enables, for instance, the occurrence of 2D Ising ferromagnetism. Here, we use magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy to demonstrate that monolayer chromium triiodide (CrI3) is an Ising ferromagnet with out-of-plane spin orientation. Its Curie temperature of 45 K is only slightly lower than the 61 K of the bulk crystal, consistent with a weak interlayer coupling. Moreover, our studies suggest a layer-dependent magnetic phase transition, showcasing the hallmark thickness-dependent physical properties typical of van der Waals crystals. Remarkably, bilayer CrI3 displays suppressed magnetization with a metamagnetic effect, while in trilayer the interlayer ferromagnetism observed in the bulk crystal is restored. Our work creates opportunities for studying magnetism by harnessing the unique features of atomically-thin materials, such as electrical control for realizing magnetoelectronics, and van der Waals engineering for novel interface phenomena.
  • Excitons in atomically-thin semiconductors necessarily lie close to a surface, and therefore their properties are expected to be strongly influenced by the surrounding dielectric environment. However, systematic studies exploring this role are challenging, in part because the most readily accessible exciton parameter -- the exciton's optical transition energy -- is largely \textit{un}affected by the surrounding medium. Here we show that the role of the dielectric environment is revealed through its systematic influence on the \textit{size} of the exciton, which can be directly measured via the diamagnetic shift of the exciton transition in high magnetic fields. Using exfoliated WSe$_2$ monolayers affixed to single-mode optical fibers, we tune the surrounding dielectric environment by encapsulating the flakes with different materials, and perform polarized low-temperature magneto-absorption studies to 65~T. The systematic increase of the exciton's size with dielectric screening, and concurrent reduction in binding energy (also inferred from these measurements), is quantitatively compared with leading theoretical models. These results demonstrate how exciton properties can be tuned in future 2D optoelectronic devices.
  • Many classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as potential platforms for novel electronic and optical devices. However, the physical properties are strongly influenced by nanoscale heterogeneities in the form of edges, grain boundaries, and nucleation sites. Using combined tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) and photoluminescence (TEPL) nano-spectroscopy and -imaging, we study the associated effects on the excitonic properties in monolayer WSe2 grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD). With <15 nm spatial resolution we resolve nonlocal nanoscale correlations of PL spectral intensity and shifts with crystal edges and internal twin boundaries associated with the expected exciton diffusion length. Through an active atomic force tip interaction we can control the crystal strain on the nanoscale, and tune the local bandgap in reversible (up to 24 meV shift) and irreversible (up to 48 meV shift) fashion. This allows us to distinguish the effect of strain from the dominant influence of defects on the PL modification at the different structural heterogeneities. Hybrid nano-optical and nano-mechanical imaging and spectroscopy thus enables the systematic study of the coupling of structural and mechanical degrees of freedom to the nanoscale electronic and optical properties in layered 2D materials.
  • Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides feature Coulomb-bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) with exceptionally large binding energy and coupled spin and valley degrees of freedom. These unique attributes have been leveraged for electrical and optical control of excitons for atomically-thin optoelectronics and valleytronics. The development of such technologies relies on understanding and quantifying the fundamental properties of the exciton. A key parameter is the intrinsic exciton homogeneous linewidth, which reflects irreversible quantum dissipation arising from system (exciton) and bath (vacuum and other quasiparticles) interactions. Using optical coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy, we provide the first experimental determination of the exciton homogeneous linewidth in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The role of exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon interactions in quantum decoherence is revealed through excitation density and temperature dependent linewidth measurements. The residual homogeneous linewidth extrapolated to zero density and temperature is ~1.5 meV, placing a lower bound of approximately 0.2 ps on the exciton radiative lifetime. The exciton quantum decoherence mechanisms presented in this work are expected to be ubiquitous in atomically-thin semiconductors.