• Neutrino production, absorption, transport, and flavor evolution in astrophysical environments is described by a kinetic equation $D\varrho=-i[{\sf H},\varrho]+{\cal C}[\varrho]$. Its basic elements are generalized occupation numbers $\varrho$, matrices in flavor space, that depend on time $t$, space $\bf x$, and momentum $\bf p$. The commutator expression encodes flavor conversion in terms of a matrix $\sf H$ of oscillation frequencies, whereas ${\cal C}[\varrho]$ represents source and sink terms as well as collisions. The Liouville operator on the left hand side involves linear derivatives in $t$, $\bf x$ and $\bf p$. The simplified expression $D=\partial_t+\hat{\bf p}\cdot{\partial}_{\bf x}$ for ultra-relativistic neutrinos was recently questioned in that flavor-dependent velocities should appear instead of the unit vector $\hat{\bf p}$. Moreover, a new damping term was postulated as a result. We here derive the full flavor-dependent velocity structure of the Liouville term although it appears to cause only higher-order corrections. Moreover, we argue that on the scale of the neutrino oscillation length, the kinetic equation can be seen as a first-order wave equation.
  • The neutrino flux at Earth is dominated in the keV energy range by the neutrinos produced in the Sun through thermal processes, namely photo production, bremsstrahlung, plasmon decay, and emission in free-bound and bound-bound transitions of partially ionized elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. Such a component of the neutrino flux is conspicuously absent from popular analyses of the all-sources spectrum at Earth, whereas if detected it could be a source of information about solar physics. Moreover, it would be the relevant background for keV-mass sterile neutrino dark matter direct searches.
  • We calculate the solar neutrino and antineutrino flux in the keV energy range. The dominant thermal source processes are photoproduction ($\gamma e\to e \nu\bar\nu$), bremsstrahlung ($e+Ze\to Ze+e+\nu\bar\nu$), plasmon decay ($\gamma\to\nu\bar\nu$), and $\nu\bar\nu$ emission in free-bound and bound-bound transitions of partially ionized elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. These latter processes dominate in the energy range of a few keV and thus carry information about the solar metallicity. To calculate their rate we use libraries of monochromatic photon radiative opacities in analogy to a previous calculation of solar axion emission. Our overall flux spectrum and many details differ significantly from previous works. While this low-energy flux is not measurable with present-day technology, it could become a significant background for future direct searches for keV-mass sterile neutrino dark matter.
  • The propagation of TeV gamma rays can be strongly modified by B-field induced conversion to axionlike particles (ALPs). We show that, at such high energies, photon dispersion is dominated by background photons - the only example where photon-photon dispersion is of practical relevance. We determine the refractive index for all energies and find that, for fixed energy density, background photons below the pair-production threshold dominate. The cosmic microwave background alone provides an "effective photon mass" of (m_gamma)^2 = -(1.01 neV * E/TeV)^2 for E < 1000 TeV. The extragalactic background light is subdominant, but local radiation fields in the galaxy or the source regions provide significant contributions. Photon-photon dispersion is small enough to leave typical scenarios of photon-ALP oscillations unscathed, but big enough to worry about it case by case.
  • According to recent studies, the collective flavor evolution of neutrinos in core-collapse supernovae depends strongly on the flavor-dependent angular distribution of the local neutrino radiation field, notably on the angular intensity of the electron-lepton number carried by neutrinos. To facilitate further investigations of this subject, we study the energy and angle distributions of the neutrino radiation field computed with the Vertex neutrino-transport code for several spherically symmetric (1D) supernova simulations (of progenitor masses 11.2, 15 and 25 M_sun) and explain how to extract this information from additional models of the Garching group. Beginning in the decoupling region ("neutrino sphere"), the distributions are more and more forward peaked in the radial direction with an angular spread that is largest for $\nu_e$, smaller for $\bar\nu_e$, and smallest for $\nu_x$, where $x=\mu$ or $\tau$. While the energy-integrated $\nu_e$ minus $\bar\nu_e$ angle distribution has a dip in the forward direction, it does not turn negative in any of our investigated cases.
  • We propose a new strategy to search for dark matter axions in the mass range of 40--400 $\mu$eV by introducing dielectric haloscopes, which consist of dielectric disks placed in a magnetic field. The changing dielectric media cause discontinuities in the axion-induced electric field, leading to the generation of propagating electromagnetic waves to satisfy the continuity requirements at the interfaces. Large-area disks with adjustable distances boost the microwave signal (10--100 GHz) to an observable level and allow one to scan over a broad axion mass range. A sensitivity to QCD axion models is conceivable with 80 disks of 1 m$^2$ area contained in a $10$ Tesla field.
  • Collective pair conversion $\nu_e\bar\nu_e\leftrightarrow \nu_{x}\bar\nu_{x}$ by forward scattering, where $x=\mu$ or $\tau$, may be generic for supernova neutrino transport. Depending on the local angular intensity of the electron lepton number carried by neutrinos, the conversion rate is "fast," i.e., of the order of $\sqrt{2}G_{\rm{F}}(n_{\nu_e}{-}\,n_{\bar\nu_e})\gg\Delta m^2_{\rm atm}/2E$. We present a novel approach to understand these phenomena: A dispersion relation for the frequency and wave number $(\Omega,\bf{K})$ of disturbances in the mean field of $\nu_e\nu_x$ flavor coherence. Run-away solutions occur in "dispersion gaps," i.e., in "forbidden" intervals of $\Omega$ and/or $\bf{K}$ where propagating plane waves do not exist. We stress that the actual solutions also depend on the initial and/or boundary conditions which need to be further investigated.
  • The helicity of a Dirac neutrino with mass $m$ evolves under the influence of a $B$-field because it has a magnetic dipole moment proportional to $m$. Moreover, it was recently shown that a polarized or anisotropic medium engenders the same effect for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Because a $B$-field polarizes a background medium, it instigates helicity oscillations even for Majorana neutrinos unless the medium is symmetric between matter and antimatter. Motivated by these observations, we review the impact of a $B$-field and of an anisotropic or polarized medium on helicity oscillations for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos from the common perspective of in-medium dispersion.
  • Neutrino-neutrino refraction in dense media can cause self-induced flavor conversion triggered by collective run-away modes of the interacting flavor oscillators. The growth rates were usually found to be of order a typical vacuum oscillation frequency $\Delta m^2/2E$. However, even in the simple case of a $\nu_e$ beam interacting with an opposite-moving $\bar\nu_e$ beam, and allowing for spatial inhomogeneities, the growth rate of the fastest-growing Fourier mode is of order $\mu=\sqrt{2} G_{\rm F} n_{\nu}$, a typical $\nu$--$\nu$ interaction energy. This growth rate is much larger than the vacuum oscillation frequency and gives rise to flavor conversion on a much shorter time scale. This phenomenon of "fast flavor conversion" occurs even for vanishing $\Delta m^2/2E$ and thus does not depend on energy, but only on the angle distributions. Moreover, it does not require neutrinos to mix or to have masses, except perhaps for providing seed disturbances. We also construct a simple homogeneous example consisting of intersecting beams and study a schematic supernova model proposed by Ray Sawyer, where $\nu_e$ and $\bar\nu_e$ emerge with different zenith-angle distributions, the key ingredient for fast flavor conversion. What happens in realistic astrophysical scenarios remains to be understood.
  • Neutrino flavor evolution in core-collapse supernovae, neutron-star mergers, or the early universe is dominated by neutrino-neutrino refraction, often spawning "self-induced flavor conversion", i.e., shuffling of flavor among momentum modes. This effect is driven by collective run-away modes of the coupled "flavor oscillators" and can spontaneously break the initial symmetries such as axial symmetry, homogeneity, isotropy, and even stationarity. Moreover, the growth rates of unstable modes can be of the order of the neutrino-neutrino interaction energy instead of the much smaller vacuum oscillation frequency: self-induced flavor conversion does not always require neutrino masses. We illustrate these newly found phenomena in terms of simple toy models. What happens in realistic astrophysical settings is up to speculation at present.
  • Self-induced flavor conversion of supernova (SN) neutrinos is a generic feature of neutrino-neutrino dispersion. The corresponding run-away modes in flavor space can spontaneously break the original symmetries of the neutrino flux and in particular can spontaneously produce small-scale features as shown in recent schematic studies. However, the unavoidable "multi-angle matter effect" shifts these small-scale instabilities into regions of matter and neutrino density which are not encountered on the way out from a SN. The traditional modes which are uniform on the largest scales are most prone for instabilities and thus provide the most sensitive test for the appearance of self-induced flavor conversion. As a by-product we clarify the relation between the time evolution of an expanding neutrino gas and the radial evolution of a stationary SN neutrino flux. Our results depend on several simplifying assumptions, notably stationarity of the solution, the absence of a "backward" neutrino flux caused by residual scattering, and global spherical symmetry of emission.
  • Fengpeng An, Guangpeng An, Qi An, Vito Antonelli, Eric Baussan, John Beacom, Leonid Bezrukov, Simon Blyth, Riccardo Brugnera, Margherita Buizza Avanzini, Jose Busto, Anatael Cabrera, Hao Cai, Xiao Cai, Antonio Cammi, Guofu Cao, Jun Cao, Yun Chang, Shaomin Chen, Shenjian Chen, Yixue Chen, Davide Chiesa, Massimiliano Clemenza, Barbara Clerbaux, Janet Conrad, Davide D'Angelo, Herve De Kerret, Zhi Deng, Ziyan Deng, Yayun Ding, Zelimir Djurcic, Damien Dornic, Marcos Dracos, Olivier Drapier, Stefano Dusini, Stephen Dye, Timo Enqvist, Donghua Fan, Jian Fang, Laurent Favart, Richard Ford, Marianne Goger-Neff, Haonan Gan, Alberto Garfagnini, Marco Giammarchi, Maxim Gonchar, Guanghua Gong, Hui Gong, Michel Gonin, Marco Grassi, Christian Grewing, Mengyun Guan, Vic Guarino, Gang Guo, Wanlei Guo, Xin-Heng Guo, Caren Hagner, Ran Han, Miao He, Yuekun Heng, Yee Hsiung, Jun Hu, Shouyang Hu, Tao Hu, Hanxiong Huang, Xingtao Huang, Lei Huo, Ara Ioannisian, Manfred Jeitler, Xiangdong Ji, Xiaoshan Jiang, Cecile Jollet, Li Kang, Michael Karagounis, Narine Kazarian, Zinovy Krumshteyn, Andre Kruth, Pasi Kuusiniemi, Tobias Lachenmaier, Rupert Leitner, Chao Li, Jiaxing Li, Weidong Li, Weiguo Li, Xiaomei Li, Xiaonan Li, Yi Li, Yufeng Li, Zhi-Bing Li, Hao Liang, Guey-Lin Lin, Tao Lin, Yen-Hsun Lin, Jiajie Ling, Ivano Lippi, Dawei Liu, Hongbang Liu, Hu Liu, Jianglai Liu, Jianli Liu, Jinchang Liu, Qian Liu, Shubin Liu, Shulin Liu, Paolo Lombardi, Yongbing Long, Haoqi Lu, Jiashu Lu, Jingbin Lu, Junguang Lu, Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev, Livia Ludhova, Shu Luo, Vladimir Lyashuk, Randolph Mollenberg, Xubo Ma, Fabio Mantovani, Yajun Mao, Stefano M. Mari, William F. McDonough, Guang Meng, Anselmo Meregaglia, Emanuela Meroni, Mauro Mezzetto, Lino Miramonti, Thomas Mueller, Dmitry Naumov, Lothar Oberauer, Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux, Alexander Olshevskiy, Fausto Ortica, Alessandro Paoloni, Haiping Peng, Jen-Chieh Peng, Ezio Previtali, Ming Qi, Sen Qian, Xin Qian, Yongzhong Qian, Zhonghua Qin, Georg Raffelt, Gioacchino Ranucci, Barbara Ricci, Markus Robens, Aldo Romani, Xiangdong Ruan, Xichao Ruan, Giuseppe Salamanna, Mike Shaevitz, Valery Sinev, Chiara Sirignano, Monica Sisti, Oleg Smirnov, Michael Soiron, Achim Stahl, Luca Stanco, Jochen Steinmann, Xilei Sun, Yongjie Sun, Dmitriy Taichenachev, Jian Tang, Igor Tkachev, Wladyslaw Trzaska, Stefan van Waasen, Cristina Volpe, Vit Vorobel, Lucia Votano, Chung-Hsiang Wang, Guoli Wang, Hao Wang, Meng Wang, Ruiguang Wang, Siguang Wang, Wei Wang, Yi Wang, Yi Wang, Yifang Wang, Zhe Wang, Zheng Wang, Zhigang Wang, Zhimin Wang, Wei Wei, Liangjian Wen, Christopher Wiebusch, Bjorn Wonsak, Qun Wu, Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz, Michael Wurm, Yufei Xi, Dongmei Xia, Yuguang Xie, Zhi-zhong Xing, Jilei Xu, Baojun Yan, Changgen Yang, Chaowen Yang, Guang Yang, Lei Yang, Yifan Yang, Yu Yao, Ugur Yegin, Frederic Yermia, Zhengyun You, Boxiang Yu, Chunxu Yu, Zeyuan Yu, Sandra Zavatarelli, Liang Zhan, Chao Zhang, Hong-Hao Zhang, Jiawen Zhang, Jingbo Zhang, Qingmin Zhang, Yu-Mei Zhang, Zhenyu Zhang, Zhenghua Zhao, Yangheng Zheng, Weili Zhong, Guorong Zhou, Jing Zhou, Li Zhou, Rong Zhou, Shun Zhou, Wenxiong Zhou, Xiang Zhou, Yeling Zhou, Yufeng Zhou, Jiaheng Zou
    Oct. 18, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\to K^++\bar\nu$ decay channel. The JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one of the building blocks of our Universe.
  • During the accretion phase of a core-collapse supernova (SN), the deleptonization flux has recently been found to develop a global dipole pattern (LESA---Lepton Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry). The $\nu_e$ minus $\bar\nu_e$ flux essentially vanishes in one direction, potentially facilitating self-induced flavor conversion. On the other hand, below the stalled shock wave, self-induced flavor conversion is typically suppressed by multi-angle matter effects, preventing any impact of flavor conversion on SN explosion dynamics. In a schematic model of SN neutrino fluxes, we study the impact of modified $\bar\nu_e$-$\nu_e$ flux asymmetries on collective flavor conversion. In the parameter space consisting of matter density and effective neutrino density, the region of instability with regard to self-induced flavor conversion is much larger for a vanishing lepton number flux, yet this modification does not intersect a realistic SN profile. Therefore, it appears that, even in the presence of LESA, self-induced flavor conversion remains suppressed below the shock front.
  • We study the potential of a future, large-volume photometric survey to constrain the axion mass $m_a$ in the hot dark matter limit. Future surveys such as Euclid will have significantly more constraining power than current observations for hot dark matter. Nonetheless, the lowest accessible axion masses are limited by the fact that axions lighter than $\sim 0.15$ eV decouple before the QCD epoch, assumed here to occur at a temperature $T_{\rm QCD} \sim 170$ MeV; this leaves an axion population of such low density that its late-time cosmological impact is negligible. For larger axion masses, $m_a \gtrsim 0.15$ eV, where axions remain in equilibrium until after the QCD phase transition, we find that a Euclid-like survey combined with Planck CMB data can detect $m_a$ at very high significance. Our conclusions are robust against assumptions about prior knowledge of the neutrino mass. Given that the proposed IAXO solar axion search is sensitive to $m_a\lesssim 0.2$ eV, the axion mass range probed by cosmology is nicely complementary.
  • Neutrino-neutrino refraction causes self-induced flavor conversion in dense neutrino fluxes. For the first time, we include the azimuth angle of neutrino propagation as an explicit variable and find a new generic multi-azimuth-angle (MAA) instability which, for simple spectra, occurs in the normal neutrino mass hierarchy. Matter suppression of this instability in supernovae requires larger densities than the traditional bimodal case. The new instability shows explicitly that solutions of the equations for collective flavor oscillations need not inherit the symmetries of initial or boundary conditions. This change of paradigm requires reconsideration of numerous results in this field.
  • The red-giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters is extended to larger brightness if the degenerate helium core loses too much energy in "dark channels." Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904), allowing for a detailed comparison between the observed tip of the RGB with predictions based on contemporary stellar evolution theory. In particular, we derive 95% confidence limits of $g_{ae}<4.3\times10^{-13}$ on the axion-electron coupling and $\mu_\nu<4.5\times10^{-12}\,\mu_{\rm B}$ (Bohr magneton $\mu_{\rm B}=e/2m_e$) on a neutrino dipole moment, based on a detailed analysis of statistical and systematic uncertainties. The cluster distance is the single largest source of uncertainty and can be improved in the future.
  • We use cosmological observations in the post-Planck era to derive limits on thermally produced cosmological axions. In the early universe such axions contribute to the radiation density and later to the hot dark matter fraction. We find an upper limit m_a < 0.67 eV at 95% C.L. after marginalising over the unknown neutrino masses, using CMB temperature and polarisation data from Planck and WMAP respectively, the halo matter power spectrum extracted from SDSS-DR7, and the local Hubble expansion rate H_0 released by the Carnegie Hubble Program based on a recalibration of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project sample. Leaving out the local H_0 measurement relaxes the limit somewhat to 0.86 eV, while Planck+WMAP alone constrain the axion mass to 1.01 eV, the first time an upper limit on m_a has been obtained from CMB data alone. Our axion limit is therefore not very sensitive to the tension between the Planck-inferred H_0 and the locally measured value. This is in contrast with the upper limit on the neutrino mass sum, which we find here to range from 0.27 eV at 95% C.L. combining all of the aforementioned observations, to 0.84 eV from CMB data alone.
  • The first full-scale three-dimensional (3D) core-collapse supernova (SN) simulations with sophisticated neutrino transport show pronounced effects of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) for two high-mass progenitors (20 and 27 M_sun). In a low-mass progenitor (11.2 M_sun), large-scale convection is the dominant nonradial hydrodynamic instability in the postshock accretion layer. The SASI-associated modulation of the neutrino signal (80 Hz in our two examples) will be clearly detectable in IceCube or the future Hyper-Kamiokande detector, depending on progenitor properties, distance, and observer location relative to the main SASI sloshing direction. The neutrino signal from the next galactic SN can therefore diagnose the nature of the hydrodynamic instability.
  • Stellar evolution is modified if energy is lost in a "dark channel" similar to neutrino emission. Comparing modified stellar evolution sequences with observations provides some of the most restrictive limits on axions and other hypothetical low-mass particles and on non-standard neutrino properties. In particular, a putative neutrino magnetic dipole moment mu_nu enhances the plasmon decay process, postpones helium ignition in low-mass stars, and therefore extends the red-giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters (GCs). The brightness of the tip of the RGB (TRGB) remains the most sensitive probe for mu_nu and we revisit this argument from a modern perspective. Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic GC M5 (NGC5904) and carefully determine its TRGB position. On the theoretical side, we add the extra plasmon decay rate brought about by mu_nu to the Princeton-Goddard-PUC stellar evolution code. Different sources of uncertainty are critically examined. The main source of systematic uncertainty is the bolometric correction and the main statistical uncertainty derives from the distance modulus based on main-sequence fitting. (Other measures of distance, e.g., the brightness of RR Lyrae stars, are influenced by the energy loss that we wish to constrain.) The statistical uncertainty of the TRGB position relative to the brightest RGB star is less important because the RGB is well populated. We infer an absolute I-band brightness of M_I=-4.17+/-0.13 mag for the TRGB compared with the theoretical prediction of -3.99+/-0.07 mag, in reasonable agreement with each other. A significant brightness increase caused by neutrino dipole moments is constrained such that mu_nu<2.6x10^-12mu_B(68% CL), where mu_B is the Bohr magneton, and mu_nu<4.5x10^-12 mu_B(95% CL). In these results, statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.
  • We construct a simple example for self-induced flavor conversion in dense neutrino gases showing new solutions that violate the symmetries of initial conditions. Our system consists of two opposite momentum modes 1 and 2, each initially occupied with equal densities of nu_e and anti-nu_e. Restricting solutions to symmetry under 1 <-> 2 allows for the usual bimodal instability ("flavor pendulum") in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy (IH) and stability (no self-induced flavor conversion) in the normal hierarchy (NH). Lifting this symmetry restriction allows for a second pendulum-like solution that occurs in NH where the modes 1 and 2 swing in opposite directions in flavor space. Any small deviation from 1-2 symmetry in the initial condition triggers the new instability in NH. This effect corresponds to the recently identified multi-azimuth angle (MAA) instability of supernova neutrino fluxes. Both cases show explicitly that solutions of the equations of collective flavor oscillations need not inherit the symmetries of initial conditions, although this has been universally assumed.
  • We re-examine solar emission of hidden photons gamma' (mass m) caused by kinetic mixing. We calculate the emission rate with thermal field theory methods and with a kinetic equation that includes "flavor oscillations" and photon absorption and emission by the thermal medium. In the resonant case both methods yield identical emission rates which, in the longitudinal channel, are enhanced by a factor w_P^2/m^2 (plasma frequency w_P) in agreement with An, Pospelov and Pradler (2013). The Sun must not emit more energy in a "dark channel" than allowed by solar neutrino measurements, i.e., not more than 10% of its photon luminosity. Together with the revised emission rate, this conservative requirement implies a bound \chi<4\times 10^-12 eV/m for the kinetic mixing parameter. This is the most restrictive stellar limit below m ~ 3 eV, whereas for larger masses the transverse channel dominates together with limits from other stars. A recent analysis of XENON10 data marginally improves the solar limit, leaving open the opportunity to detect solar hidden photons with future large-scale dark matter experiments. Detecting low-mass hidden photons with the ALPS-II photon-regeneration experiment also remains possible.
  • To study the capabilities of supernova neutrino detectors, the instantaneous spectra are often represented by a quasi-thermal distribution of the form f(E) = E^alpha e^{-(alpha+1)E/E_{av}} where E_{av} is the average energy and alpha a numerical parameter. Based on a spherically symmetric supernova model with full Boltzmann neutrino transport we have, at a few representative post-bounce times, re-converged the models with vastly increased energy resolution to test the fit quality. For our examples, the spectra are well represented by such a fit in the sense that the counting rates for a broad range of target nuclei, sensitive to different parts of the spectrum, are reproduced very well. Therefore, the mean energy and root-mean-square energy of numerical spectra hold enough information to provide the correct alpha and to forecast the response of multi-channel supernova neutrino detection.
  • The dense neutrino flux streaming from a core-collapse supernova can undergo self-induced flavor conversion caused by neutrino-neutrino refraction. Numerical studies of these nonlinear effects are challenging because representing the neutrino radiation field by discrete energy and angle bins can easily lead to unphysical solutions. In particular, if the number of angle bins N_a is too small, flavor conversion begins too deep and produces completely spurious results. At the same time, N_a=1 (single-angle approximation) can be a good proxy for the N_a -> infinity limit. Based on a linearized stability analysis, we explain some of the puzzling effects of discrete angle distributions.
  • We study supernova neutrino flux variations in the IceCube detector, using 3D models based on a simplified neutrino transport scheme. The hemispherically integrated neutrino emission shows significantly smaller variations compared with our previous study of 2D models, largely because of the reduced SASI activity in this set of 3D models which we interpret as a pessimistic extreme. For the studied cases, intrinsic flux variations up to about 100 Hz frequencies could still be detected in a supernova closer than about 2 kpc.
  • Axions or similar hypothetical pseudoscalar bosons may have a small CP-violating scalar Yukawa interaction g_s(N) with nucleons, causing macroscopic monopole-dipole forces. Torsion-balance experiments constrain g_p(e) g_s(N), whereas g_p(N) g_s(N) is constrained by the depolarization rate of ultra-cold neutrons or spin-polarized nuclei. However, the pseudoscalar couplings g_p(e) and g_p(N) are strongly constrained by stellar energy-loss arguments and g_s(N) by searches for anomalous monopole-monopole forces, together providing the most restrictive limits on g_p(e) g_s(N) and g_p(N) g_s(N). The laboratory limits on g_s(N) are currently the most restrictive constraints on CP-violating axion interactions.