• We present a detailed study of the colours in late-type galaxy discs for ten of the EDisCS galaxy clusters with 0.5 < z < 0.8. Our cluster sample contains 172 spiral galaxies, and our control sample is composed of 96 field disc galaxies. We deconvolve their ground-based V and I images obtained with FORS2 at the VLT with initial spatial resolutions between 0.4 and 0.8 arcsec to achieve a final resolution of 0.1 arcsec with 0.05 arcsec pixels, which is close to the resolution of the ACS at the HST. After removing the central region of each galaxy to avoid pollution by the bulges, we measured the V-I colours of the discs. We find that 50% of cluster spiral galaxies have disc V-I colours redder by more than 1 sigma of the mean colours of their field counterparts. This is well above the 16% expected for a normal distribution centred on the field disc properties. The prominence of galaxies with red discs depends neither on the mass of their parent cluster nor on the distance of the galaxies to the cluster cores. Passive spiral galaxies constitute 20% of our sample. These systems are not abnormally dusty. They are are made of old stars and are located on the cluster red sequences. Another 24% of our sample is composed of galaxies that are still active and star forming, but less so than galaxies with similar morphologies in the field. These galaxies are naturally located in the blue sequence of their parent cluster colour-magnitude diagrams. The reddest of the discs in clusters must have stopped forming stars more than ~5 Gyr ago. Some of them are found among infalling galaxies, suggesting preprocessing. Our results confirm that galaxies are able to continue forming stars for some significant period of time after being accreted into clusters, and suggest that star formation can decline on seemingly long (1 to 5 Gyr) timescales.
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an enclosed mass of $1.6\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}.$ Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.
  • We present the results of the first strong lens time delay challenge. The motivation, experimental design, and entry level challenge are described in a companion paper. This paper presents the main challenge, TDC1, which consisted of analyzing thousands of simulated light curves blindly. The observational properties of the light curves cover the range in quality obtained for current targeted efforts (e.g.,~COSMOGRAIL) and expected from future synoptic surveys (e.g.,~LSST), and include simulated systematic errors. \nteamsA\ teams participated in TDC1, submitting results from \nmethods\ different method variants. After a describing each method, we compute and analyze basic statistics measuring accuracy (or bias) $A$, goodness of fit $\chi^2$, precision $P$, and success rate $f$. For some methods we identify outliers as an important issue. Other methods show that outliers can be controlled via visual inspection or conservative quality control. Several methods are competitive, i.e., give $|A|<0.03$, $P<0.03$, and $\chi^2<1.5$, with some of the methods already reaching sub-percent accuracy. The fraction of light curves yielding a time delay measurement is typically in the range $f = $20--40\%. It depends strongly on the quality of the data: COSMOGRAIL-quality cadence and light curve lengths yield significantly higher $f$ than does sparser sampling. Taking the results of TDC1 at face value, we estimate that LSST should provide around 400 robust time-delay measurements, each with $P<0.03$ and $|A|<0.01$, comparable to current lens modeling uncertainties. In terms of observing strategies, we find that $A$ and $f$ depend mostly on season length, while P depends mostly on cadence and campaign duration.
  • Weak gravitational lensing has the potential to place tight constraints on the equation of the state of dark energy. However, this will only be possible if shear measurement methods can reach the required level of accuracy. We present a new method to measure the ellipticity of galaxies used in weak lensing surveys. The method makes use of direct deconvolution of the data by the total Point Spread Function (PSF). We adopt a linear algebra formalism that represents the PSF as a Toeplitz matrix. This allows us to solve the convolution equation by applying the Hopfield Neural Network iterative scheme. The ellipticity of galaxies in the deconvolved images are then measured using second order moments of the autocorrelation function of the images. To our knowledge, it is the first time full image deconvolution is used to measure weak lensing shear. We apply our method to the simulated weak lensing data proposed in the GREAT10 challenge and obtain a quality factor of Q=87. This result is obtained after applying image denoising to the data, prior to the deconvolution. The additive and multiplicative biases on the shear power spectrum are then +0.000009 and +0.0357, respectively.
  • We present a weak lensing mass map covering ~124 square degrees of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey (CS82). We study the statistics of rare peaks in the map, including peak abundance, the peak-peak correlation functions and the tangential-shear profiles around peaks. We find that the abundance of peaks detected in CS82 is consistent with predictions from a Lambda-CDM cosmological model, once noise effects are properly included. The correlation functions of peaks with different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are well described by power laws, and there is a clear cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Constant Mass galaxies and high SNR peaks. The tangential-shear profiles around peaks increase with peak SNR. We fit analytical models to the tangential-shear profiles, including a projected singular isothermal sphere (SIS) model and a projected Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) model, plus a two-halo term. For the high SNR peaks, the SIS model is rejected at ~3-sigma. The NFW model plus a two-halo term gives more acceptable fits to the data. Some peaks match the positions of optically detected clusters, while others are relatively dark. Comparing dark and matched peaks, we find a difference in lensing signal of a factor of 2, suggesting that about half of the dark peaks are false detections.
  • It is anticipated that the large sky areas covered by planned wide-field weak lensing surveys will reduce statistical errors to such an extent that systematic errors will instead become the dominant source of uncertainty. It is therefore crucial to devise numerical methods to measure galaxy shapes with the least possible systematic errors. We present a simple "forward deconvolution" method, gfit, to measure galaxy shapes given telescope and atmospheric smearings, in the presence of noise. The method consists in fitting a single 2D elliptical S\'ersic profile to the data, convolved with the point spread function. We applied gfit to the data proposed in the GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) Galaxy Challenge. In spite of its simplicity, gfit obtained the lowest additive bias {($\sqrt{\mathcal{A}}=0.057\times10^{-4}$)} on the shear power spectrum among twelve different methods and the second lowest multiplicative bias {($\mathcal{M}/2=0.583\times10^{-2}$)}. It remains that gfit is a fitting method and is therefore affected by noise bias. However, the simplicity of the underlying galaxy model combined with the use of an efficient customized minimization algorithm allow very competitive performances, at least on the GREAT10 data, for a relatively low computing time.
  • We present four new seasons of optical monitoring data and six epochs of X-ray photometry for the doubly-imaged lensed quasar Q J0158-4325. The high-amplitude, short-period microlensing variability for which this system is known has historically precluded a time delay measurement by conventional methods. We attempt to circumvent this limitation by application of a Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique, but we are only able to prove that the delay must have the expected sign (image A leads image B). Despite our failure to robustly measure the time delay, we successfully model the microlensing at optical and X-ray wavelengths to find a half light radius for soft X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,soft}/cm) = 14.3^{+0.4}_{-0.5}, an upper limit on the half-light radius for hard X-ray emission log(r_{1/2,X,hard}/cm) <= 14.6 and a refined estimate of the inclination-corrected scale radius of the optical R-band (rest frame 3100 Angstrom) continuum emission region of log(r_s/cm) = 15.6+-0.3.
  • We conducted an exploratory search for quasars at z~ 6 - 8, using the Early Data Release from United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky survey (UKIDSS) cross-matched to panoramic optical imagery. High redshift quasar candidates are chosen using multi-color selection in i,z,Y,J,H and K bands. After removal of apparent instrumental artifacts, our candidate list consisted of 34 objects. We further refined this list with deeper imaging in the optical for ten of our candidates. Twenty-five candidates were followed up spectroscopically in the near-infrared and in the optical. We confirmed twenty-five of our spectra as very low-mass main-sequence stars or brown dwarfs, which were indeed expected as the main contaminants of this exploratory search. The lack of quasar detection is not surprising: the estimated probability of finding a single z>6 quasar down to the limit of UKIDSS in the 27.3 square degrees of the EDR is <5%. We find that the most important limiting factor in this work is the depth of the available optical data. Experience gained in this pilot project can help refine high-redshift quasar selection criteria for subsequent UKIDSS data releases.
  • We have used HST imaging of the central regions (R<100 arcsec, about 5 core radii) of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae to derive proper motions and U- and V-band magnitudes for 14,366 cluster members. We also present a catalogue of astrometry and F475W photometry for nearly 130,000 stars in a rather larger central area. These data are made available in their entirety, in the form of downloadable electronic tables. We use them first to obtain a new estimate for the position of the cluster center and to define the stellar density profile into essentially zero radius. We then search in particular for any very fast-moving stars, such as might be expected to result from very close stellar encounters. Likely fewer than 0.1% (and no more than about 0.3%) of stars have total speeds above the nominal central escape velocity in 47 Tuc, and at lower speeds the velocity distribution is described very well by a regular King model. Considerations of only the proper-motion velocity dispersion then lead to a number of results: (1) Blue stragglers in the core of 47 Tuc have a velocity dispersion lower than that of the cluster giants by a factor of sqrt{2}. (2) The velocity distribution in the cluster center is essentially isotropic, as expected. (3) Using a sample of radial velocities for stars in the core, we estimate the distance to 47 Tuc: D = 4.0 +/- 0.35 kpc. And (4) we infer a 1-sigma upper limit of M<1000-1500 solar masses for any central, intermediate-mass black hole. We can neither confirm nor refute the hypothesis that 47 Tuc might lie on an extension of the M-sigma relation observed for supermassive black holes in galaxy bulges. [Abridged]
  • We present a high resolution (R ~ 43000) abundance analysis of a total of nine stars in three of the five globular clusters associated with the nearby Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. These three clusters (1, 2 and 3) trace the oldest, most metal-poor stellar populations in Fornax. We determine abundances of O, Mg, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, Ba, La, Nd and Eu in most of these stars, and for some stars also Mn and La. We demonstrate that classical indirect methods (isochrone fitting and integrated spectra) of metallicity determination lead to values of [Fe/H] which are 0.3 to 0.5 dex too high, and that this is primarily due to the underlying reference calibration typically used by these studies. We show that Cluster 1, with [Fe /H] = -2.5, now holds the record for the lowest metallicity globular cluster. We also measure an over-abundance of Eu in Cluster 3 stars that has only been previously detected in a subgroup of stars in M15. We find that the Fornax globular cluster properties are a global match to what is found in their Galactic counterparts; including deep mixing abundance patterns in two stars. We conclude that at the epoch of formation of globular clusters both the Milky Way and the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy shared the same initial conditions, presumably pre-enriched by the same processes, with identical nucleosynthesis patterns.
  • Since its launch in April 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has produced an increasing flow of scientific results. The large number of refereed publications based on HST data allows a detailed evaluation of the effectiveness of this observatory and of its scientific programs. This paper presents the results of selected science metrics related to paper counts, citation counts, citation history, high-impact papers, and the most productive programs and most cited papers, through the end of 2003. All these indicators point towards the high-quality scientific impact of HST.
  • We discuss the main properties of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) blue straggler stars (BSS), as inferred from our new catalog containing nearly 3000 BSS. The catalog has been extracted from the photometrically homogeneous V vs. (B-V) color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) of 56 GCs, based on WFPC2 images of their central cores. In our analysis we used consistent relative distances based on the same photometry and calibration. The number of BSS has been normalized to obtain relative frequencies (F_{BSS}) and specific densities (N_S) using different stellar populations extracted from the CMD. The cluster F_{BSS} is significantly smaller than the relative frequency of field BSS. We find a significant anti-correlation between the BSS relative frequency in a cluster and its total absolute luminosity (mass). There is no statistically significant trend between the BSS frequency and the expected collision rate. F_{BSS} does not depend on other cluster parameters, apart from a mild dependence on the central density. PCC clusters act like normal clusters as far as the BSS frequency is concerned. We also show that the BSS luminosity function for the most luminous clusters is significantly different, with a brighter peak and extending to brighter luminosities than in the less luminous clusters. These results imply that the efficiency of BSS production mechanisms and their relative importance vary with the cluster mass.
  • Scarpa et al. (2003) have used their new measurements of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion at radii R ~ 30-45 pc in omega Centauri to argue for modifications to Newtonian dynamics (MOND) at low accelerations in the outer reaches of this globular cluster. Alternatively, any such evidence could be taken as an indication of the presence of an extended dark-matter halo. We show that the data of Scarpa et al. are in fact consistent with earlier observations by Seitzer and by Meylan et al., which are in turn well described at large radii by simple, self-consistent dynamical models. There is no need to invoke MOND or dark matter to explain the current data.
  • We have measured Keck/HIRES radial velocities for 30 candidate red giants in the direction of Palomar 13: an object traditionally cataloged as a compact, low-luminosity globular cluster. From a sample of 21 confirmed members, we find a systemic velocity of 24.1 km/s and a projected, intrinsic velocity dispersion of 2.2 km/s. Although small, this dispersion is several times larger than that expected for a globular cluster of this luminosity and central concentration. Taken at face value, this dispersion implies a mass-to-light ratio of ~ 40 (in solar units) based on the best-fit King-Michie model. The surface density profile of Palomar 13 also appears to be anomalous among Galactic globular clusters -- depending upon the details of background subtraction and model-fitting, Palomar 13 either contains a substantial population of "extra-tidal" stars, or it is far more spatially extended than previously suspected. The full surface density profile is equally well-fit by a King-Michie model having a high concentration and large tidal radius, or by a NFW model. We examine -- and tentatively reject -- a number of possible explanations for the observed characteristics of Palomar 13 (e.g., velocity "jitter" among the red giants, spectroscopic binary stars, non-standard mass functions, modified Newtonian dynamics), and conclude that the two most plausible scenarios are either catastrophic heating during a recent perigalacticon passage, or the presence of a massive dark halo. Thus, the available evidence suggests that Palomar 13 is either a globular cluster which is now in the process of dissolving into the Galactic halo, or a faint, dark-matter-dominated stellar system (ABRIDGED).
  • Using current observational data and simple dynamical modeling, we demonstrate that Omega Cen is not special among the Galactic globular clusters in its ability to produce and retain the heavy elements dispersed in the AGB phase of stellar evolution. The multiple stellar populations observed in Omega Cen cannot be explained if it had formed as an isolated star cluster. The formation within a progenitor galaxy of the Milky Way is more likely, although the unique properties of Omega Cen still remain a mystery.
  • Mass determinations are difficult to obtain and still frequently characterised by deceptively large uncertainties. We review below the various mass estimators used for star clusters of all ages and luminosities. We highlight a few recent results related to (i) very massive old star clusters, (ii) the differences and similarities between star clusters and cores of dwarf elliptical galaxies, and (iii) the possible strong biases on mass determination induced by tidal effects.
  • March 24, 2000 astro-ph
    Star clusters - open and globulars - experience dynamical evolution on time scales shorter than their age. Consequently, open and globular clusters provide us with unique dynamical laboratories for learning about two-body relaxation, mass segregation from equipartition of energy, and core collapse. We review briefly, in the framework of star clusters, some elements related to the theoretical expectation of mass segregation, the results from N-body and other computer simulations, as well as the now substantial clear observational evidence.
  • We present our study of the 2-D structures of the tidal tails associated with 20 galactic globular clusters, structures obtained by using the wavelet transform to detect weak structures at large scale and filter the strong background noise for the low galactic latitude clusters (Leon, Meylan & Combes 2000). We also present N-body simulations of globular clusters, in orbits around the Galaxy, in order to study quantitatively and geometrically the tidal effects they encounter (Combes, Leon & Meylan 2000).
  • We have used WFPC2 to construct B, V color-magnitude diagrams of four metal-rich globular clusters, NGC 104 (47 Tuc), NGC 5927, NGC 6388, and NGC 6441. All four clusters have well populated red horizontal branches (RHB), as expected for their metallicity. However, NGC 6388 and 6441 also exhibit a prominent blue HB (BHB) extension, including stars reaching as faint in V as the turnoff luminosity. This discovery demonstrates directly for the first time that a major population of hot HB stars can exist in old, metal-rich systems. This may have important implications for the interpretation of the integrated spectra of elliptical galaxies. The cause of the phenomenon remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that NGC 6388 and 6441 are older than the other clusters, but a simple difference in age may not be sufficient to produce the observed distributions along the HB. The high central densities in NGC 6388 and 6441 suggest that the existence of the blue HB (BHB) tails might be caused by stellar interactions in the dense cores of these clusters, which we calculate to have two of the highest collision rates among globular clusters in the Galaxy. Tidal collisions might act in various ways to enhance loss of envelope mass, and therefore populate the blue side of the HB. However, the relative frequency of tidal collisions does not seem large enough (compared to that of the clusters with pure RHBs) to account for such a drastic difference in HB morphology. While a combination of an age difference and dynamical interactions may help, prima facie the lack of a radial gradient in the BHB/RHB star ratio seems to argue against dynamical effects playing a role.