• Users posting online expect to remain anonymous unless they have logged in, which is often needed for them to be able to discuss freely on various topics. Preserving the anonymity of a text's writer can be also important in some other contexts, e.g., in the case of witness protection or anonymity programs. However, each person has his/her own style of writing, which can be analyzed using stylometry, and as a result, the true identity of the author of a piece of text can be revealed even if s/he has tried to hide it. Thus, it could be helpful to design automatic tools that can help a person obfuscate his/her identity when writing text. In particular, here we propose an approach that changes the text, so that it is pushed towards average values for some general stylometric characteristics, thus making the use of these characteristics less discriminative. The approach consists of three main steps: first, we calculate the values for some popular stylometric metrics that can indicate authorship; then we apply various transformations to the text, so that these metrics are adjusted towards the average level, while preserving the semantics and the soundness of the text; and finally, we add random noise. This approach turned out to be very efficient, and yielded the best performance on the Author Obfuscation task at the PAN-2016 competition.
  • The question how complex systems become more organized and efficient with time is open. Examples are, the formation of elementary particles from pure energy, the formation of atoms from particles, the formation of stars and galaxies, the formation of molecules from atoms, of organisms, and of the society. In this sequence, order appears inside complex systems and randomness (entropy) is expelled to their surroundings. Key features of self-organizing systems are that they are open and they are far away from equilibrium, with increasing energy flowing through them. This work searches for global measures of such self-organizing systems, that are predictable and do not depend on the substrate of the system studied. Our results will help to understand the existence of complex systems and mechanisms of self-organization. In part we also provide insights, in this work, about the underlying physical essence of the Moore's law and the multiple logistic growth observed in technological progress.
  • In this paper we study the equation $$ w^{(4)} = 5 w" (w^2 - w') + 5 w (w')^2 - w^5 + (\lambda z + \alpha)w + \gamma, $$ which is one of the higher-order Painlev\'e equations (i.e., equations in the polynomial class having the Painlev\'e property). Like the classical Painlev\'e equations, this equation admits a Hamiltonian formulation, B\"acklund transformations and families of rational and special functions. We prove that this equation considered as a Hamiltonian system with parameters $\gamma/\lambda = 3 k$, $\gamma/\lambda = 3 k - 1$, $k \in \mathbb{Z}$, is not integrable in Liouville sense by means of rational first integrals. To do that we use the Ziglin-Morales-Ruiz-Ramis approach. Then we study the integrability of the second and third members of the $\mathrm{P}_{\mathrm{II}}$-hierarchy. Again as in the previous case it turns out that the normal variational equations are particular cases of the generalized confluent hypergeometric equations whose differential Galois groups are non-commutative and hence, they are obstructions to integrability.
  • We study the integrability of a Hamiltonian system describing the stationary solutions in Bose--Fermi mixtures in one dimensional optical lattices. We prove that the system is integrable only when it is separable. The proof is based on the Differential Galois approach and Ziglin-Morales-Ramis method.
  • Transforming the resistive plate chambers from charged-particle into gamma-quanta detectors opens the way towards their application as a basic element of a hybrid imaging system, which combines positron emission tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a single device and provides non- and minimally- invasive quantitative methods for diagnostics. To this end, we performed detailed investigations encompassing the whole chain from the annihilation of the positron in the body, through the conversion of the created photons into electrons and to the optimization of the electron yield in the gas. GEANT4 based simulations of the efficiency of the RPC photon detectors with different converter materials and geometry were conducted for optimization of the detector design. The results justify the selection of a sandwich-type gas-insulator-converter design, with Bi or Pb as converter materials.
  • Optics labs are an integral part of the advanced curriculum for physics majors. Students majoring in other disciplines, like chemistry, biology or engineering rarely have the opportunity to learn about the most recent optical techniques and mathematical representation used in today's science and industry optics. Stokes analysis of polarization of light is one of those methods that are increasingly necessary but are seldom taught outside advanced physics or optics classes that are limited to physics majors. On the other hand biology and chemistry majors already use matrix and polarization techniques in the labs for their specialty, which makes the transition to matrix calculations seamless. Since most of the students in those majors postpone their enrollment in physics, most of the registered in those classes are juniors and seniors, enabling them to handle those techniques. We chose to study polymer samples to aid students majoring in other disciplines, especially chemistry and engineering, with understanding of the optical nature of some of the objects of their study. The argument in this paper is that it is advantageous to introduce Stokes analysis for those students and show a lab developed and taught for several years that has successfully, in our experience, done that. Measurements of oriented and unoriented polymer samples are discussed to demonstrate to students the effects of the molecular polarizability on the sample birefringence and the anisotropic Fletcher indicatrix in general.
  • In this paper we formulate the Least Action Principle for an Organized System as the minimum of the total sum of the actions of all of the elements. This allows us to see how this most basic law of physics determines the development of the system towards states with less action - organized states. Also we state that the metric tensor can describe the specific state of the constraints of the system, which is its actual organization. With this the organization is defined in two ways: 1. A quantitative: the action I. 2. A qualitative: the metric tensor. These two measures can describe the level of development and the specifics of the organization of a system. We consider closed and open systems.