• Price of anarchy quantifies the degradation of social welfare in games due to the lack of a centralized authority that can enforce the optimal outcome. At its antipodes, mechanism design studies how to ameliorate these effects by incentivizing socially desirable behavior and implementing the optimal state as equilibrium. In practice, the responsiveness to such measures depends on the wealth of each individual. This leads to a natural, but largely unexplored, question. Does optimal mechanism design entrench, or maybe even exacerbate, social inequality? We study this question in nonatomic congestion games, arguably one of the most thoroughly studied settings from the perspectives of price of anarchy as well as mechanism design. We introduce a new model that incorporates the wealth distribution of the population and captures the income elasticity of travel time. This allows us to argue about the equality of wealth distribution both before and after employing a mechanism. We start our analysis by establishing a broad qualitative result, showing that tolls always increase inequality in symmetric congestion games under any reasonable metric of inequality, e.g., the Gini index. Next, we introduce the iniquity index, a novel measure for quantifying the magnitude of these forces towards a more unbalanced wealth distribution and show it has good normative properties (robustness to scaling of income, no-regret learning). We analyze iniquity both in theoretical settings (Pigou's network under various wealth distributions) as well as experimental ones (based on a large scale field experiment in Singapore). Finally, we provide an algorithm for computing optimal tolls for any point of the trade-off of relative importance of efficiency and equality. We conclude with a discussion of our findings in the context of theories of justice as developed in contemporary social sciences.
  • We establish that first-order methods avoid saddle points for almost all initializations. Our results apply to a wide variety of first-order methods, including gradient descent, block coordinate descent, mirror descent and variants thereof. The connecting thread is that such algorithms can be studied from a dynamical systems perspective in which appropriate instantiations of the Stable Manifold Theorem allow for a global stability analysis. Thus, neither access to second-order derivative information nor randomness beyond initialization is necessary to provably avoid saddle points.
  • Regularized learning is a fundamental technique in online optimization, machine learning and many other fields of computer science. A natural question that arises in these settings is how regularized learning algorithms behave when faced against each other. We study a natural formulation of this problem by coupling regularized learning dynamics in zero-sum games. We show that the system's behavior is Poincar\'e recurrent, implying that almost every trajectory revisits any (arbitrarily small) neighborhood of its starting point infinitely often. This cycling behavior is robust to the agents' choice of regularization mechanism (each agent could be using a different regularizer), to positive-affine transformations of the agents' utilities, and it also persists in the case of networked competition, i.e., for zero-sum polymatrix games.
  • Routing games are amongst the most well studied domains of game theory. How relevant are these pen-and-paper calculations to understanding the reality of everyday traffic routing? We focus on a semantically rich dataset that captures detailed information about the daily behavior of thousands of Singaporean commuters and examine the following basic questions: (i) Does the traffic equilibrate? (ii) Is the system behavior consistent with latency minimizing agents? (iii) Is the resulting system efficient? In order to capture the efficiency of the traffic network in a way that agrees with our everyday intuition we introduce a new metric, the stress of catastrophe, which reflects the combined inefficiencies of both tragedy of the commons as well as price of anarchy effects.
  • The YouTube-8M video classification challenge requires teams to classify 0.7 million videos into one or more of 4,716 classes. In this Kaggle competition, we placed in the top 3% out of 650 participants using released video and audio features. Beyond that, we extend the original competition by including text information in the classification, making this a truly multi-modal approach with vision, audio and text. The newly introduced text data is termed as YouTube-8M-Text. We present a classification framework for the joint use of text, visual and audio features, and conduct an extensive set of experiments to quantify the benefit that this additional mode brings. The inclusion of text yields state-of-the-art results, e.g. 86.7% GAP on the YouTube-8M-Text validation dataset.
  • Black-Scholes (BS) is the standard mathematical model for option pricing in financial markets. Option prices are calculated using an analytical formula whose main inputs are strike (at which price to exercise) and volatility. The BS framework assumes that volatility remains constant across all strikes, however, in practice it varies. How do traders come to learn these parameters? We introduce natural models of learning agents, in which they update their beliefs about the true implied volatility based on the opinions of other traders. We prove convergence of these opinion dynamics using techniques from control theory and leader-follower models, thus providing a resolution between theory and market practices. We allow for two different models, one with feedback and one with an unknown leader.
  • Small changes to the parameters of a system can lead to abrupt qualitative changes of its behavior, a phenomenon known as bifurcation. Such instabilities are typically considered problematic, however, we show that their power can be leveraged to design novel types of mechanisms. Hysteresis mechanisms use transient changes of system parameters to induce a permanent improvement to its performance via optimal equilibrium selection. Optimal control mechanisms induce convergence to states whose performance is better than even the best equilibrium. We apply these mechanisms in two different settings that illustrate the versatility of bifurcation mechanism design. In the first one we explore how introducing flat taxation can improve social welfare, despite decreasing agent "rationality", by destabilizing inefficient equilibria. From there we move on to consider a well known game of tumor metabolism and use our approach to derive novel cancer treatment strategies.
  • Routing games are one of the most successful domains of application of game theory. It is well understood that simple dynamics converge to equilibria, whose performance is nearly optimal regardless of the size of the network or the number of agents. These strong theoretical assertions prompt a natural question: How well do these pen-and-paper calculations agree with the reality of everyday traffic routing? We focus on a semantically rich dataset from Singapore's National Science Experiment that captures detailed information about the daily behavior of thousands of Singaporean students. Using this dataset, we can identify the routes as well as the modes of transportation used by the students, e.g. car (driving or being driven to school) versus bus or metro, estimate source and sink destinations (home-school) and trip duration, as well as their mode-dependent available routes. We quantify both the system and individual optimality. Our estimate of the Empirical Price of Anarchy lies between 1.11 and 1.22. Individually, the typical behavior is consistent from day to day and nearly optimal, with low regret for not deviating to alternative paths.
  • The Multiplicative Weights Update (MWU) method is a ubiquitous meta-algorithm that works as follows: A distribution is maintained on a certain set, and at each step the probability assigned to element $\gamma$ is multiplied by $(1 -\epsilon C(\gamma))>0$ where $C(\gamma)$ is the "cost" of element $\gamma$ and then rescaled to ensure that the new values form a distribution. We analyze MWU in congestion games where agents use \textit{arbitrary admissible constants} as learning rates $\epsilon$ and prove convergence to \textit{exact Nash equilibria}. Our proof leverages a novel connection between MWU and the Baum-Welch algorithm, the standard instantiation of the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for hidden Markov models (HMM). Interestingly, this convergence result does not carry over to the nearly homologous MWU variant where at each step the probability assigned to element $\gamma$ is multiplied by $(1 -\epsilon)^{C(\gamma)}$ even for the most innocuous case of two-agent, two-strategy load balancing games, where such dynamics can provably lead to limit cycles or even chaotic behavior.
  • What does it mean to fully understand the behavior of a network of adaptive agents? The golden standard typically is the behavior of learning dynamics in potential games, where many evolutionary dynamics, e.g., replicator, are known to converge to sets of equilibria. Even in such classic settings many critical questions remain unanswered. We examine issues such as: Point-wise convergence: Does the system actually equilibrate even in the presence of continuums of equilibria? Computing regions of attraction: Given point-wise convergence can we compute the region of asymptotic stability of each equilibrium (e.g., estimate its volume, geometry)? System invariants: Invariant functions remain constant along every system trajectory. This notion is orthogonal to the game theoretic concept of a potential function, which always strictly increases/decreases along system trajectories. Do dynamics in potential games exhibit invariant functions? If so, how many? How do these functions look like? Based on these geometric characterizations, we propose a novel quantitative framework for analyzing the efficiency of potential games with many equilibria. The predictions of different equilibria are weighted by their probability to arise under evolutionary dynamics given uniformly random initial conditions. This average case analysis is shown to offer novel insights in classic game theoretic challenges, including quantifying the risk dominance in stag-hunt games and allowing for more nuanced performance analysis in networked coordination and congestion games with large gaps between price of stability and price of anarchy.
  • Given a non-convex twice differentiable cost function f, we prove that the set of initial conditions so that gradient descent converges to saddle points where \nabla^2 f has at least one strictly negative eigenvalue has (Lebesgue) measure zero, even for cost functions f with non-isolated critical points, answering an open question in [Lee, Simchowitz, Jordan, Recht, COLT2016]. Moreover, this result extends to forward-invariant convex subspaces, allowing for weak (non-globally Lipschitz) smoothness assumptions. Finally, we produce an upper bound on the allowable step-size.
  • A new approach to understanding evolution [Val09], namely viewing it through the lens of computation, has already started yielding new insights, e.g., natural selection under sexual reproduction can be interpreted as the Multiplicative Weight Update (MWU) Algorithm in coordination games played among genes [CLPV14]. Using this machinery, we study the role of mutation in changing environments in the presence of sexual reproduction. Following [WVA05], we model changing environments via a Markov chain, with the states representing environments, each with its own fitness matrix. In this setting, we show that in the absence of mutation, the population goes extinct, but in the presence of mutation, the population survives with positive probability. On the way to proving the above theorem, we need to establish some facts about dynamics in games. We provide the first, to our knowledge, polynomial convergence bound for noisy MWU in a coordination game. Finally, we also show that in static environments, sexual evolution with mutation converges, for any level of mutation.
  • We develop a quasi-polynomial time Las Vegas algorithm for approximating Nash equilibria in polymatrix games over trees, under a mild renormalizing assumption. Our result, in particular, leads to an expected polynomial-time algorithm for computing approximate Nash equilibria of tree polymatrix games in which the number of actions per player is a fixed constant. Further, for trees with constant degree, the running time of the algorithm matches the best known upper bound for approximating Nash equilibria in bimatrix games (Lipton, Markakis, and Mehta 2003). Notably, this work closely complements the hardness result of Rubinstein (2015), which establishes the inapproximability of Nash equilibria in polymatrix games over constant-degree bipartite graphs with two actions per player.
  • A key question in biological systems is whether genetic diversity persists in the long run under evolutionary competition or whether a single dominant genotype emerges. Classic work by Kalmus in 1945 has established that even in simple diploid species (species with two chromosomes) diversity can be guaranteed as long as the heterozygote individuals enjoy a selective advantage. Despite the classic nature of the problem, as we move towards increasingly polymorphic traits (e.g. human blood types) predicting diversity and understanding its implications is still not fully understood. Our key contribution is to establish complexity theoretic hardness results implying that even in the textbook case of single locus diploid models predicting whether diversity survives or not given its fitness landscape is algorithmically intractable. We complement our results by establishing that under randomly chosen fitness landscapes diversity survives with significant probability. Our results are structurally robust along several dimensions (e.g., choice of parameter distribution, different definitions of stability/persistence, restriction to typical subclasses of fitness landscapes). Technically, our results exploit connections between game theory, nonlinear dynamical systems, complexity theory and biology and establish hardness results for predicting the evolution of a deterministic variant of the well known multiplicative weights update algorithm in symmetric coordination games which could be of independent interest.
  • In a recent series of papers a surprisingly strong connection was discovered between standard models of evolution in mathematical biology and Multiplicative Weights Updates Algorithm, a ubiquitous model of online learning and optimization. These papers establish that mathematical models of biological evolution are tantamount to applying discrete Multiplicative Weights Updates Algorithm, a close variant of MWUA, on coordination games. This connection allows for introducing insights from the study of game theoretic dynamics into the field of mathematical biology. Using these results as a stepping stone, we show that mathematical models of haploid evolution imply the extinction of genetic diversity in the long term limit, a widely believed conjecture in genetics. In game theoretic terms we show that in the case of coordination games, under minimal genericity assumptions, discrete MWUA converges to pure Nash equilibria for all but a zero measure of initial conditions. This result holds despite the fact that mixed Nash equilibria can be exponentially (or even uncountably) many, completely dominating in number the set of pure Nash equilibria. Thus, in haploid organisms the long term preservation of genetic diversity needs to be safeguarded by other evolutionary mechanisms such as mutations and speciation.
  • We present a new class of vertex cover and set cover games. The price of anarchy bounds match the best known constant factor approximation guarantees for the centralized optimization problems for linear and also for submodular costs -- in contrast to all previously studied covering games, where the price of anarchy cannot be bounded by a constant (e.g. [6, 7, 11, 5, 2]). In particular, we describe a vertex cover game with a price of anarchy of 2. The rules of the games capture the structure of the linear programming relaxations of the underlying optimization problems, and our bounds are established by analyzing these relaxations. Furthermore, for linear costs we exhibit linear time best response dynamics that converge to these almost optimal Nash equilibria. These dynamics mimic the classical greedy approximation algorithm of Bar-Yehuda and Even [3].
  • Covering and packing problems can be modeled as games to encapsulate interesting social and engineering settings. These games have a high Price of Anarchy in their natural formulation. However, existing research applicable to specific instances of these games has only been able to prove fast convergence to arbitrary equilibria. This paper studies general classes of covering and packing games with learning dynamics models that incorporate a central authority who broadcasts weak, socially beneficial signals to agents that otherwise only use local information in their decision-making. Rather than illustrating convergence to an arbitrary equilibrium that may have very high social cost, we show that these systems quickly achieve near-optimal performance. In particular, we show that in the public service advertising model, reaching a small constant fraction of the agents is enough to bring the system to a state within a log n factor of optimal in a broad class of set cover and set packing games or a constant factor of optimal in the special cases of vertex cover and maximum independent set, circumventing social inefficiency of bad local equilibria that could arise without a central authority. We extend these results to the learn-then-decide model, in which agents use any of a broad class of learning algorithms to decide in a given round whether to behave according to locally optimal behavior or the behavior prescribed by the broadcast signal. The new techniques we use for analyzing these games could be of broader interest for analyzing more general classic optimization problems in a distributed fashion.