• \AA{}ngstr\"om precision localization of a single nanoantenna is a crucial step towards advanced nanometrology, medicine and biophysics. Here, we show that single nanoantenna displacements down to few \AA{}ngstr\"oms can be resolved with sub-\AA{}ngstr\"om precision using an all-optical method. We utilize the tranverse Kerker scattering scheme where a carefully structured light beam excites a combination of multipolar modes inside a dielectric nanoantenna, which then upon interference, scatters directionally into the far-field. We spectrally tune our scheme such that it is most sensitive to the change in directional scattering per nanoantenna displacement. Finally, we experimentally show that antenna displacement down to 3 \AA{} is resolvable with a localization precision of 0.6 \AA{}.
  • We study the discrimination of weak coherent states of light with significant overlaps by nondestructive measurements on the light states through measuring atomic states that are entangled to the coherent states via dipole coupling. In this way, the problem of measuring and discriminating coherent light states is shifted to finding the appropriate atom-light interaction and atomic measurements. We show that this scheme allows us to attain a probability of error extremely close to the Helstrom bound, the ultimate quantum limit for discriminating binary quantum states, through the simple Jaynes-Cummings interaction between the field and ancilla with optimized light-atom coupling and projective measurements on the atomic states. Moreover, since the measurement is nondestructive on the light state, information that is not detected by one measurement can be extracted from the post-measurement light states through subsequent measurements.
  • We investigate the chiroptical response of a single plasmonic nanohelix interacting with a weakly-focused circularly-polarized Gaussian beam. The optical scattering at the fundamental resonance is characterized experimentally, and the chiral behavior of the nanohelix is explained based on a multipole analysis. The angularly resolved emission of the excited nanohelix is verified experimentally and it validates the theoretical results. Further, we study the first higher-order resonance and explain the formation of chiral dipoles in both cases.
  • We investigate points of circular polarization in the far field of elliptically polarized dipoles and establish a relation between the angular position and helicity of these C points and the dipole moment. In the case of highly eccentric dipoles, the C points of opposite handedness exhibit only a small angular separation and occur in the low intensity region of the emission pattern. In this regard, we introduce an optical weak measurement approach that utilizes the transverse electric (azimuthal) and transverse magnetic (radial) far-field polarization basis. Projecting the far field onto a spatially varying post-selected polarization state reveals the angular separation and the helicity of the C points. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach and determine the elliptical dipole moment of a particle sitting on an interface by measuring the C points in its far field.
  • When quantum states are used to send classical information, the receiver performs a measurement on the signal states. The amount of information extracted is often not optimal due to the receiver's measurement scheme and experimental apparatus. For quantum non-demolition measurements, there is potentially some residual information in the post-measurement state, while part of the information has been extracted and the rest is destroyed. Here, we propose a framework to characterize a quantum measurement by how much information it extracts and destroys, and how much information it leaves in the residual post-measurement state. The concept is illustrated for several receivers discriminating coherent states.
  • Quantum communication has been successfully implemented in optical fibres and through free-space [1-3]. Fibre systems, though capable of fast key rates and low quantum bit error rates (QBERs), are impractical in communicating with destinations without an established fibre link [4]. Free-space quantum channels can overcome such limitations and reach long distances with the advent of satellite-to-ground links [5-8]. Shorter line-of-sight free-space links have also been realized for intra-city conditions [2, 9]. However, turbulence, resulting from local fluctuations in refractive index, becomes a major challenge by adding errors and losses [10]. Recently, an interest in investigating the possibility of underwater quantum channels has arisen, which could provide global secure communication channels among submersibles and boats [11-13]. Here, we investigate the effect of turbulence on an underwater quantum channel using twisted photons in outdoor conditions. We study the effect of turbulence on transmitted QBERs, and compare different QKD protocols in an underwater quantum channel showing the feasibility of high-dimensional encoding schemes. Our work may open the way for secure high-dimensional quantum communication between submersibles, and provides important input for potential submersibles-to-satellite quantum communication.
  • We report on the observation of broadband (40 THz) bright twin beams through high-gain parametric down-conversion in an aperiodically poled lithium niobate crystal. The output photon number is shown to scale exponentially with the pump power and not with the pump amplitude, as in homogeneous crystals. Photon-number correlations and the number of frequency/temporal modes are assessed by spectral covariance measurements. By using sum-frequency generation on the surface of a non-phasematched crystal, we measure a cross-correlation peak with the temporal width 90 fs.
  • Non-classical concerns light whose properties cannot be explained by classical electrodynamics and which requires invoking quantum principles to be understood. Its existence is a direct consequence of field quantization; its study is a source of our understanding of many quantum phenomena. Non-classical light also has properties that may be of technological significance. We start this chapter by discussing the definition of non-classical light and basic examples. Then some of the most prominent applications of non-classical light are reviewed. After that, as the principal part of our discourse, we review the most common sources of non-classical light. We will find them surprisingly diverse, including physical systems of various sizes and complexity, ranging from single atoms to optical crystals and to semiconductor lasers. Putting all these dissimilar optical devices in the common perspective we attempt to establish a trend in the field and to foresee the new cross-disciplinary approaches and techniques of generating non-classical light.
  • We show that, contrary to popular belief, non only diffraction-free beams may reconstruct themselves after hitting an opaque obstacle but also, for example, Gaussian beams. We unravel the mathematics and the physics underlying the self-reconstruction mechanism and we provide for a novel definition for the minimum reconstruction distance beyond geometric optics, which is in principle applicable to any optical beam that admits an angular spectrum representation. Moreover, we propose to quantify the self-reconstruction ability of a beam via a newly established degree of self-healing. This is defined via a comparison between the amplitudes, as opposite to intensities, of the original beam and the obstructed one. Such comparison is experimentally accomplished by tailoring an innovative experimental technique based upon Shack-Hartmann wave front reconstruction. We believe that these results can open new avenues in this field.
  • In an unseeded SU(1,1) interferometer composed of two cascaded degenerate parametric amplifiers, with direct detection at the output, we demonstrate a phase sensitivity overcoming the shot noise limit by 2.3 dB. The interferometer is strongly unbalanced, with the parametric gain of the second amplifier exceeding the gain of the first one by a factor of 2, which makes the scheme extremely tolerant to detection losses. We show that by increasing the gain of the second amplifier, the phase supersensitivity of the interferometer can be preserved even with detection losses as high as 80%. This finding can considerably improve the state-of-the-art interferometry, enable sub-shot-noise phase sensitivity in spectral ranges with inefficient detection, and allow extension to quantum imaging.
  • Multi-photon processes are the essence of nonlinear optics. Optical harmonics generation and multi-photon absorption, ionization, polymerization or spectroscopy are widely used in practical applications. Generally, the rate of an n-photon effect scales as the n-th order autocorrelation function of the incident light, which is high for light with strong photon-number fluctuations. Therefore `noisy' light sources are much more efficient for multi-photon effects than coherent sources with the same mean power, pulse duration and repetition rate. Here we generate optical harmonics of order 2-4 from bright squeezed vacuum (BSV), a state of light consisting of only quantum noise with no coherent component. We observe up to two orders of magnitude enhancement in the generation of optical harmonics due to ultrafast photon-number fluctuations. This feature is especially important for the nonlinear optics of fragile structures where the use of a `noisy' pump can considerably increase the effect without overcoming the damage threshold.
  • Focusing with a 4$\pi$ parabolic mirror allows for concentrating light from nearly the complete solid angle, whereas focusing with a single microscope objective limits the angle cone used for focusing to half solid angle at maximum. Increasing the solid angle by using deep parabolic mirrors comes at the cost of adding more complexity to the mirror's fabrication process and might introduce errors that reduce the focusing quality. To determine these errors, we experimentally examine the focusing properties of a 4$\pi$ parabolic mirror that was produced by single-point diamond turning. The properties are characterized with a single $^{174}$Yb$^{+}$ ion as a mobile point scatterer. The ion is trapped in a vacuum environment with a movable high optical access Paul trap. We demonstrate an effective focal spot size of 209 nm in lateral and 551 nm in axial direction. Such tight focusing allows us to build an efficient light-matter interface. Our findings agree with numerical simulations incorporating a finite ion temperature and interferometrically measured wavefront aberrations induced by the parabolic mirror. We point at further technological improvements and discuss the general scope of applications of a 4$\pi$ parabolic mirror.
  • The measurement of quantum signals that traveled through long distances is of fundamental and technological interest. We present quantum-limited coherent measurements of optical signals, sent from a satellite in geostationary Earth orbit to an optical ground station. We bound the excess noise that the quantum states could have acquired after having propagated 38600 km through Earth's gravitational potential as well as its turbulent atmosphere. Our results indicate that quantum communication is feasible in principle in such a scenario, highlighting the possibility of a global quantum key distribution network for secure communication.
  • We develop a systematic coarse graining procedure for systems of $N$ qubits. We exploit the underlying geometrical structures of the associated discrete phase space to produce a coarse-grained version with reduced effective size. Our coarse-grained spaces inherit key properties of the original ones. In particular, our procedure naturally yields a subset of the original measurement operators, which can be used to construct a coarse discrete Wigner function. These operators also constitute a systematic choice of incomplete measurements for the tomographer wishing to probe an intractably large system.
  • We discuss and measure the phase shift imposed onto a radially polarized light beam when focusing it onto an $^{174}\text{Yb}^{+}$ ion. In the derivation of the expected phase shifts we include the properties of the involved atomic levels. Furthermore, we emphasize the importance of the scattering cross section and its relation to the efficiency for coupling the focused light to an atom. The phase shifts found in the experiment are compatible with the expected ones when accounting for known deficiencies of the focusing optics and the motion of the trapped ion at the Doppler limit of laser cooling.
  • Light beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) are convenient carriers of quantum information. They can be also used for imparting rotational motion to particles and provide high resolution in imaging. Due to the conservation of OAM in parametric down-conversion (PDC), signal and idler photons generated at low gain have perfectly anti-correlated OAM values. It is interesting to study the OAM properties of high-gain PDC, where the same OAM modes can be populated with large, but correlated, numbers of photons. Here we investigate the OAM spectrum of high-gain PDC and show that the OAM mode content can be controlled by varying the pump power and the configuration of the source. In our experiment, we use a source consisting of two nonlinear crystals separated by an air gap. We discuss the OAM properties of PDC radiation emitted by this source and suggest possible modifications.
  • We show that the interpretation of $\mathbf{D}=\varepsilon_{0} \mathbf{E}$ as vacuum polarization is consistent with quantum electrodynamics. A free electromagnetic field polarizes the vacuum but the magnetization and polarization currents cancel giving zero source current. The speed of light is a universal constant while the fine structure constant that couples the EM field to matter runs. In that sense, the quantum vacuum can be understood as a modern Lorentz invariant ether.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises information-theoretically secure communication, and is already on the verge of commercialization. Thus far, different QKD protocols have been proposed theoretically and implemented experimentally [1, 2]. The next step will be to implement high-dimensional protocols in order to improve noise resistance and increase the data rate [3-7]. Hitherto, no experimental verification of high-dimensional QKD in the single-photon regime has been conducted outside of the laboratory. Here, we report the realization of such a single-photon QKD system in a turbulent free-space link of 0.3 km over the city of Ottawa, taking advantage of both the spin and orbital angular momentum photonic degrees of freedom. This combination of optical angular momenta allows us to create a 4-dimensional state [8]; wherein, using a high-dimensional BB84 protocol [3, 4], a quantum bit error rate of 11\% was attained with a corresponding secret key rate of 0.65 bits per sifted photon. While an error rate of 5\% with a secret key rate of 0.43 bits per sifted photon is achieved for the case of 2-dimensional structured photons. Even through moderate turbulence without active wavefront correction, it is possible to securely transmit information carried by structured photons, opening the way for intra-city high-dimensional quantum communications under realistic conditions.
  • The properties of the vacuum are described by quantum physics including the response to external fields such as electromagnetic radiation. Of the two parameters that govern the details of the electromagnetic field dynamics in vacuum, one is fixed by the requirement of Lorentz invariance $c= 1/\sqrt{\varepsilon_{0} \mu_{0}}$. The other one, $Z_{0}= \sqrt{\mu_{0}/\varepsilon_{0}} = 1/(c\varepsilon_{0})$ and its relation to the quantum vacuum, is discussed in this contribution. Deriving $\varepsilon_{0}$ from the properties of the quantum vacuum implies the derivation of the fine structure constant.
  • The validity of the superposition principle and of Born's rule are well-accepted tenants of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly, it has recently been predicted that the intensity pattern formed in a three-slit experiment is seemingly in contradiction with the predictions of the most conventional form of the superposition principle when exotic looped trajectories are taken into account. However, the probability of observing such paths is typically very small and thus rendering them extremely difficult to measure. In this work, we confirm the validity of Born's rule and present the first experimental observation of these exotic trajectories as additional paths for the light by directly measuring their contribution to the formation of optical interference fringes. We accomplish this by enhancing the electromagnetic near-fields in the vicinity of the slits through the excitation of surface plasmons. This process effectively increases the probability of occurrence of these exotic trajectories, demonstrating that they are related to the near-field component of the photon's wavefunction.
  • We propose a method to produce pure single photons with an arbitrary designed temporal shape in a heralded, lossless and scalable way. As the indispensable resource, the method uses pairs of time-energy entangled photons. To accomplish the shaping, one photon of a pair undergoes temporal modulation according to the desired shape. Subsequent frequency-resolving detection of the photon heralds its entangled counterpart in a pure quantum state with a temporal shape non-locally affected by the modulation. We found conditions for the shape of the heralded photon to reproduce the modulation function. The method can be implemented with various sources of time-energy entangled photons. In particular, using entangled photons from the parametric down-conversion the method enables generation of pure photons with tunable shape within unprecedentedly broad range of temporal durations - from tenths of femtoseconds to microseconds. Proposed shaping of single photons will push forward implementation of scalable multidimensional quantum information protocols, efficient photon-matter coupling and quantum control at the level of single quanta.
  • We address the response, both in amplitude and intensity, of a Fabry-Perot from a variety of viewpoints. These complementary pictures conspire to achieve a comprehensive and consistent theory of the operation of this system.
  • Bright squeezed vacuum, a promising tool for quantum information, can be generated by high-gain parametric down-conversion. However, its frequency and angular spectra are typically quite broad, which is undesirable for applications requiring single-mode radiation. We tailor the frequency spectrum of high-gain parametric down-conversion using an SU(1,1) interferometer consisting of two nonlinear crystals with a dispersive medium separating them. The dispersive medium allows us to select a narrow band of the frequency spectrum to be exponentially amplified by high-gain parametric amplification. The frequency spectrum is thereby narrowed from (56.5 +- 0.1) to (1.22 +- 0.02) THz and, in doing so, the number of frequency modes is reduced from approximately 50 to 1.82 +- 0.02. Moreover, this method provides control and flexibility over the spectrum of the generated light through the timing of the pump.
  • With the emergence of an information society, the idea of protecting sensitive data is steadily gaining importance. Conventional encryption methods may not be sufficient to guarantee data protection in the future. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is an emerging technology that exploits fundamental physical properties to guarantee perfect security in theory. However, it is not easy to ensure in practice that the implementations of QKD systems are exactly in line with the theoretical specifications. Such theory-practice deviations can open loopholes and compromise the security. Several of such loopholes have been discovered and investigated in the last decade. These activities have motivated the proposal and implementation of appropriate countermeasures, thereby preventing future attacks and enhancing the practical security of QKD. This article introduces the so-called field of quantum hacking by summarizing a variety of attacks and their prevention mechanisms.
  • Optical dipole-traps are used in various scientific fields, including classical optics, quantum optics and biophysics. Here, we propose and implement a dipole-trap for nanoparticles that is based on focusing from the full solid angle with a deep parabolic mirror. The key aspect is the generation of a linear-dipole mode which is predicted to provide a tight trapping potential. We demonstrate the trapping of rod-shaped nanoparticles and validate the trapping frequencies to be on the order of the expected ones. The described realization of an optical trap is applicable for various other kinds of solid-state targets. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of optical dipole-traps which simultaneously provide high trap stiffness and allow for efficient interaction of light and matter in free space.