• In this research note we identify 130 new M-type candidate members of young associations with the BANYAN $\Sigma$ tool and recently published trigonometric distances from RECONS and URAT-South. We identify a white dwarf candidate in the AB Doradus moving group, but determine that its cooling age is too large and reject it as a member. Three stars (G 13-39, LHS 2935 and G 152-1) now have complete kinematics and are strong candidate members in the AB Doradus and Carina-Near moving groups, but still lack a confirmation of their young age independent of their kinematics.
  • We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 115 helium-line (DB) and 28 cool, He-rich hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs based on atmosphere fits to optical spectroscopy and photometry. We find that 63% of our DB population show hydrogen lines, making them DBA stars. We also demonstrate the persistence of pure DB white dwarfs with no detectable hydrogen feature at low effective temperatures. Using state-of-the art envelope models, we next compute the total quantity of hydrogen, $M_{\rm{H}}$, that is contained in the outer convection zone as a function of effective temperature and atmospheric H/He ratio. We find that some $(T_{\rm{eff}},M_{\rm{H}})$ pairs cannot physically exist as a homogeneously mixed structure; such combination can only occur as stratified objects of the DA spectral type. On that basis, we show that the values of $M_{\rm{H}}$ inferred for the bulk of the DBA stars are too large and incompatible with the convective dilution scenario. We also present evidence that the hydrogen abundances measured in DBA and cool, helium-rich white dwarfs cannot be globally accounted for by any kind of accretion mechanism onto a pure DB star. We suggest that cool, He-rich DA white dwarfs are most likely created by the convective mixing of a DA star with a thin hydrogen envelope; they are not cooled down DBA's. We finally explore several scenarios that could account for the presence of hydrogen in DBA stars.
  • We present a detailed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of 219 DA and DB white dwarfs for which trigonometric parallax measurements are available. Our aim is to compare the physical parameters derived from the spectroscopic and photometric techniques, and then to test the theoretical mass-radius relation for white dwarfs using these results. The agreement between spectroscopic and photometric parameters is found to be excellent, especially for effective temperatures, showing that our model atmospheres and fitting procedures provide an accurate, internally consistent analysis. Values of surface gravity and solid angle, obtained respectively from spectroscopy and photometry, are combined with parallax measurements in various ways to study the validity of the mass-radius relation from an empirical point of view. After a thorough examination of our results, we find that 73% and 92% of the white dwarfs are consistent within 1 and 2$\sigma$ confidence levels, respectively, with the predictions of the mass-radius relation, thus providing strong support to the theory of stellar degeneracy. Our analysis also allows us to identify 15 stars that are better interpreted in terms of unresolved double degenerate binaries. Atmospheric parameters for both components in these binary systems are obtained using a novel approach. We further identify a few white dwarfs that are possibly composed of an iron core rather than a carbon/oxygen core, since they are consistent with Fe-core evolutionary models.
  • We present an analysis of the evolutionary and pulsation properties of the extremely low-mass white dwarf precursor (B) component of the double-lined eclipsing system WASP 0247-25. Given that the fundamental parameters of that star have been obtained previously at a unique level of precision, WASP 0247-25B represents the ideal case for testing evolutionary models of this newly-found category of pulsators. Taking into account the known constraints on the mass, orbital period, effective temperature, surface gravity, and atmospheric composition, we present a model that is compatible with these constraints and show pulsation modes that have periods very close to the observed values. Importantly, these modes are predicted excited. Although the overall consistency remains perfectible, the observable properties of WASP 0247-25B are closely reproduced. A key ingredient of our binary evolutionary models is represented by rotational mixing as the main competitor against gravitational settling. Depending on assumptions made about the values of the degree index l for the observed pulsation modes, we found three possible seismic solutions. We discuss two tests, rotational splitting and multicolor photometry, that should readily identify the modes and discriminate between these solutions. However, this will require improved temporal resolution and higher S/N observations than currently available.
  • Taking advantage of a recent FORS2/VLT spectroscopic sample of Extreme Horizontal Branch (EHB) stars in $\omega$ Cen, we isolate 38 spectra well suited for detailed atmospheric studies and determine their fundamental parameters ($T_{\rm eff}$, log $g$, and log $N$(He)/$N$(H)) using NLTE, metal line-blanketed models. We find that our targets can be divided into three groups: 6 stars are hot ($T_{\rm eff}$$\buildrel>\over\sim\ $ 45,000 K) H-rich subdwarf O stars, 7 stars are typical H-rich sdB stars ($T_{\rm eff}$$ \buildrel<\over\sim\ $35,000 K), and the remaining 25 targets at intermediate effective temperatures are He-rich (log $N$(He)/$N$(H)$ \buildrel>\over\sim\ $ $-$1.0) subdwarfs. Surprisingly and quite interestingly, these He-rich hot subdwarfs in $\omega$ Cen cluster in a narrow temperature range ($\sim$35,000 K to $\sim$40,000 K). We additionally measure the atmospheric carbon abundance and find a most interesting positive correlation between the carbon and helium atmospheric abundances. This correlation certainly bears the signature of diffusion processes - most likely gravitational settling impeded by stellar winds or internal turbulence - but also constrains possible formation scenarios proposed for EHB stars in $\omega$ Cen. For the He-rich objects in particular, the clear link between helium and carbon enhancement points towards a late hot flasher evolutionary history.
  • The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 years, a newly-refined determination), is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from HST imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 +/- 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (Z=0.014) is assumed for the HR Diagram flitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse & Sauval (Z=0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, eleven new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated, to investigate the dependence of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) the core composition, (3) the helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19+/-0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59(+0.44,-0.26) Msun. In a plot of initial vs final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several sigma below a straight line fit.
  • Context. Asteroseismic determinations of structural parameters of hot B subdwarfs (sdB) have been carried out for more than a decade now. These analyses rely on stellar models whose reliability for the required task needs to be evaluated critically. Aims. We present new models of the so-called third generation (3G) dedicated to the asteroseismology of sdB stars. These parameterized models are complete static structures suitable for analyzing both p- and g-mode pulsators, contrary to the former second generation (2G) models that were limited to p-modes. While the reliability of the 2G models has been successfully verified in the past, this important test still has to be conducted on the 3G structures. Methods. The close eclipsing binary PG 1336-018 provides a unique opportunity to test the reliability of sdB models. We compared the structural parameters of the sdB component in PG 1336-018 obtained from asteroseismology based on the 3G models, with those derived independently from the modeling of the reflection/irradiation effect and the eclipses observed in the light curve. Results. The stellar parameters inferred from asteroseismology using the 3G models are found to be remarkably consistent with both the preferred orbital solution obtained from the binary light curve modeling and the updated spectroscopic estimates for the surface gravity of the star. We also show that the uncertainties on the input physics included in stellar models have no noticeable impact, at the current level of accuracy, on the structural parameters derived by asteroseismology. Conclusions. The stellar models presently used to carry out quantitative seismic analyses of sdB stars are reliable for the task. The stellar parameters inferred by this technique, at least for those that could be tested (M*, R*, and log g), appear to be both very precise and accurate, as no significant systematic effect has been found.
  • The main goal of this project is to search for p-mode oscillations in a selected sample of DA white dwarfs near the blue edge of the DAV (g-mode) instability strip, where the p-modes should be excited following theoretical models. A set of high quality time-series data on nine targets has been obtained in 3 photometric bands (Sloan u', g', r') using ULTRACAM at the VLT with a typical time resolution of a few tens of ms. Such high resolution is required because theory predicts very short periods, of the order of a second, for the p-modes in white dwarfs. The data have been analyzed using Fourier transform and correlation analysis methods. Results: P-modes have not been detected in any of our targets. The upper limits obtained for the pulsation amplitude, typically less than 0.1%, are the smallest limits reported in the literature. The Nyquist frequencies are large enough to fully cover the frequency range of interest for the p-modes. For the brightest target of our sample, G 185-32, a p-mode oscillation with a relative amplitude of 5x10**(-4) would have been easily detected, as shown by a simple simulation. For G 185-32 we note an excess of power below ~2 Hz in all the three nights of observation, which might be due in principle to tens of low-amplitude close modes. However, neither correlation analysis nor Fourier transform of the amplitude spectrum show significant results. We also checked the possibility that the p-modes have a very short lifetime, shorter than the observing runs, by dividing each run in several subsets and analyzing these subsets independently. The amplitude spectra show only a few peaks with S/N ratio higher than 4 sigma but the same peaks are not detected in different subsets, as we would expect, and we do not see any indication of frequency spacing. As a secondary result of this project, ... (see the paper)
  • In 2007, a companion with planetary mass was found around the pulsating subdwarf B star V391 Pegasi with the timing method, indicating that a previously undiscovered population of substellar companions to apparently single subdwarf B stars might exist. Following this serendipitous discovery, the EXOTIME (http://www.na.astro.it/~silvotti/exotime/) monitoring program has been set up to follow the pulsations of a number of selected rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars on time-scales of several years with two immediate observational goals: 1) determine Pdot of the pulsational periods P 2) search for signatures of substellar companions in O-C residuals due to periodic light travel time variations, which would be tracking the central star's companion-induced wobble around the center of mass. These sets of data should therefore at the same time: on the one hand be useful to provide extra constraints for classical asteroseismological exercises from the Pdot (comparison with "local" evolutionary models), and on the other hand allow to investigate the preceding evolution of a target in terms of possible "binary" evolution by extending the otherwise unsuccessful search for companions to potentially very low masses. While timing pulsations may be an observationally expensive method to search for companions, it samples a different range of orbital parameters, inaccessible through orbital photometric effects or the radial velocity method: the latter favours massive close-in companions, whereas the timing method becomes increasingly more sensitive towards wider separations. In this paper we report on the status of the on-going observations and coherence analysis for two of the currently five targets, revealing very well-behaved pulsational characteristics in HS 0444+0458, while showing HS 0702+6043 to be more complex than previously thought.
  • V391 Peg (HS2201+2610) is an extreme horizontal branch subdwarf B (sdB) star, it is an hybrid pulsator showing p- and g-mode oscillations, and hosts a 3.2/sini M_Jup planet at an orbital distance of about 1.7 AU. In order to improve the characterization of the star, we measured the pulsation amplitudes in the u'g'r' SLOAN photometric bands using ULTRACAM at the William Herschel 4.2 m telescope and we compared them with theoretical values. The preliminary results presented in this article conclusively show that the two main pulsation periods at 349.5 and 354.1 s are a radial and a dipole mode respectively. This is the first time that the degree index of multiple modes has been uniquely identified for an sdB star as faint as V391 Peg (B=14.4), proving that multicolor photometry is definitely an efficient technique to constrain mode identification, provided that the data have a high enough quality.
  • We present new cooling sequences, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams for cool white dwarfs with pure hydrogen atmospheres down to an effective temperature $\te=1500$ K. We include a more detailed treatment of the physics of the fully-ionized interior, particularly an improved discussion of the thermodynamics of the temperature-dependent ion-ion and ion-electron contributions of the quantum, relativistic electron-ion plasma. The present calculations also incorporate accurate boundary conditions between the degenerate core and the outermost layers as well as updated atmosphere models including the H$_2$-H$_2$ induced-dipole absorption. We examine the differences on the cooling time of the star arising from uncertainties in the initial carbon-oxygen profile and the core-envelope $L$-$T_c$ relation. The maximum time delay due to crystallization-induced chemical fractionation remains substantial, from $\sim 1.0$ Gyr for 0.5 and 1.2 $\msol$ white dwarfs to $\sim 1.5$ Gyr for 0.6 to 0.8 $\msol$ white dwarfs, even with initial stratified composition profiles, and cannot be ignored in detailed white dwarf cooling calculations. These cooling sequences provide theoretical support to search for or identify old disk or halo hydrogen-rich white dwarfs by characterizing their mass and age from their observational signatures.
  • We present key sample results of a systematic survey of the pulsation properties of models of hot B subdwarfs. We use equilibrium structures taken from detailed evolutionary sequences of solar metallicity (Z = 0.02) supplemented by grids of static envelope models of various metallicities (Z = 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10). We consider all pulsation modes with l = 0, 1, 2, and 3 in the 80--1500 s period window, the interval currently most suitable for fast photometric detection techniques. We establish that significant driving is often present in hot B subdwarfs and is due to an opacity bump associated with heavy element ionization. We find that models with Z >= 0.04 show low radial order unstable modes; both radial and nonradial (p, f, and g) pulsations are excited. The unstable models have Teff > 30,000 K, and log g > 5.7, depending somewhat on the metallicity. We emphasize that metal enrichment needs only occur locally in the driving region. On this basis, combined with the accepted view that local enrichments and depletions of metals are common place in the envelopes of hot B subdwarfs, we predict that some of these stars should show luminosity variations resulting from pulsational instabilities.