• We report on the results of a 4-year timing campaign of PSR~J2222$-0137$, a 2.44-day binary pulsar with a massive white dwarf (WD) companion, with the Nan\c{c}ay, Effelsberg and Lovell radio telescopes. Using the Shapiro delay for this system, we find a pulsar mass $m_{p}=1.76,\pm\,0.06,M_\odot$ and a WD mass $m_{c}\,=\,1.293\,\pm\,0.025\, M_\odot$. We also measure the rate of advance of periastron for this system, which is marginally consistent with the GR prediction for these masses. The short lifetime of the massive WD progenitor star led to a rapid X-ray binary phase with little ($< \, 10^{-2} \, M_\odot$) mass accretion onto the neutron star (NS); hence, the current pulsar mass is, within uncertainties, its birth mass; the largest measured to date. We discuss the discrepancy with previous mass measurements for this system; we conclude that the measurements presented here are likely to be more accurate. Finally, we highlight the usefulness of this system for testing alternative theories of gravity by tightly constraining the presence of dipolar radiation. This is of particular importance for certain aspects of strong-field gravity, like spontaneous scalarization, since the mass of PSR~J2222$-0137$ puts that system into a poorly tested parameter range.
  • This paper presents 828 new 21 cm neutral hydrogen line measurements carried out with the FORT receiver of the meridian transit Nan\c{c}ay radio telescope (NRT) in the years 2000 -- 2007. This observational program was part of a larger project aimed at collecting an exhaustive and magnitude-complete HI extragalactic catalog for Tully-Fisher applications. Through five massive data releases, the KLUN series has collected a homogeneous sample of 4876 HI-spectra of spiral galaxies, complete down to a flux of 5 Jy.km.s^{-1} and with declination delta > -40{\deg}. We publish here the last release of the KLUN HI observational program, corresponding to the faint end of the survey, with HI masses ranging from 5 10^8 to 5 10^{10} solar masses. The size of this final sample is comparable to the catalogs based on the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescope campaigns, and it allows general HI mass distribution studies from a set of homogeneous radio measurements.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • The pulsar PSR J1756$-$2251 resides in a relativistic double neutron star (DNS) binary system with a 7.67-hr orbit. We have conducted long-term precision timing on more than 9 years of data acquired from five telescopes, measuring five post-Keplerian parameters. This has led to several independent tests of general relativity (GR), the most constraining of which shows agreement with the prediction of GR at the 4% level. Our measurement of the orbital decay rate disagrees with that predicted by GR, likely due to systematic observational biases. We have derived the pulsar distance from parallax and orbital decay measurements to be 0.73$_{-0.24}^{+0.60}$ kpc (68%) and < 1.2 kpc (95% upper limit), respectively; these are significantly discrepant from the distance estimated using Galactic electron density models. We have found the pulsar mass to be 1.341$\pm$0.007 M$_\odot$, and a low neutron star (NS) companion mass of 1.230$\pm$0.007 M$_\odot$. We also determined an upper limit to the spin-orbit misalignment angle of 34{\deg} (95%) based on a system geometry fit to long-term profile width measurements. These and other observed properties have led us to hypothesize an evolution involving a low mass loss, symmetric supernova progenitor to the second-formed NS companion, as is thought to be the case for the double pulsar system PSR J0737$-$3039A/B. This would make PSR J1756$-$2251 the second compact binary system providing concrete evidence for this type of NS formation channel.
  • We present an ongoing survey with the Nan\c{c}ay Radio Telescope at L-band. The targeted area is $74^\circ \lesssim l <150^\circ$ and $3.5^\circ < |b| < 5^\circ$. This survey is characterized by a long integration time (18 min), large bandwidth (512 MHz) and high time and frequency resolution (64 $\mu$s and 0.5 MHz) giving a nominal sensitivity limit of 0.055 mJy for long period pulsars. This is about 2 times better than the mid-latitude HTRU survey, and is designed to be complementary with current large scale surveys. This survey will be more sensitive to transients (RRATs, intermittent pulsars), distant and faint millisecond pulsars as well as scintillating sources (or any other kind of radio faint sources) than all previous short-integration surveys.
  • Shortly after the discovery of PSR J1906+0746, some hints of profile variations were already interpreted as first signs of relativistic spin-precession occuring. Using observations from the Nan\c{c}ay, Arecibo and Green Bank Radio Observatories, we report here the measurement of pulse profile and polarimetric variations. Using the Rotating Vector Model, we show that PSR J1906+0746 is likely to be an orthogonal rotator ($\alpha \simeq 80^\circ$). Fitting our polarimetric data to a precession model, we determined the geometry of the pulsar and found a wide misalignment angle ($\delta = 89_{-44}^{+85}$ deg, 95% C.L.), although the uncertainty is large. Assuming this geometry, we constructed the beam maps of both magnetic poles.
  • We report on the high precision timing analysis of the pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1012+5307. Using 15 years of multi-telescope data from the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) network, a significant measurement of the variation of the orbital period is obtained. Using this ideal strong-field gravity laboratory we derive theory independent limits for both the dipole radiation and the variation of the gravitational constant.
  • This paper presents 452 new 21-cm neutral hydrogen line measurements carried out with the FORT receiver of the meridian transit Nan\c{c}ay radiotelescope (NRT) in the period April 2003 -- March 2005. This observational programme is part of a larger project aiming at collecting an exhaustive and magnitude-complete HI extragalactic catalogue for Tully-Fisher applications (the so-called KLUN project, for Kinematics of the Local Universe studies, end in 2008). The whole on-line HI archive of the NRT contains today reduced HI-profiles for ~4500 spiral galaxies of declination delta > -40&deg; (http://klun.obs-nancay.fr). As an example of application, we use direct Tully-Fisher relation in three (JHK) bands in deriving distances to a large catalog of 3126 spiral galaxies distributed through the whole sky and sampling well the radial velocity range between 0 and 8000 km/s. Thanks to an iterative method accounting for selection bias and smoothing effects, we show as a preliminary output a detailed and original map of the velocity field in the Local Universe.
  • Galaxy evolution is a complex process where both the inner evolution of stellar population, gas and dust, and the external effects, like interactions and exchanges with the environment, have to be taken into account. It has been fundamental in the last years to be able to build and use homogeneous catalogues both in the local and the far universe. The observation of galaxy morphology and kinematics as a function of the redshift is indeed necessary to disentangle the various galaxy formation and evolution scenarios. Some years ago, the hyperleda extragalactic database was designed to study the local universe from the point of view of both stellar populations and galaxies kinematics and dynamics. Today it contains homogeneous data for about 3 millions of galaxies, with for each up to 80 astrophysical parameters available. We will describe here the MIGALE project which emcompasses the HyperLeda databases plus a series of tools developed to study the dynamical, chemical and morphological evolution of galaxies. It will include, in particular, methods to analyse the GIRAFFE cosmological fields (IFU spectroscopy) and compare them with the Local Universe.
  • We study the mass distribution and the infall pattern of the Perseus-Pisces (PP) supercluster. First we calculate the mass of the central part of PP, a sphere with a radius of 15/h Mpc centered at (l,b)=(140.2\deg ,-22.0\deg), d=50/h Mpc, using the virial and other estimators. We get M_{PP} = 4 -- 7 /h 10^{15} M_{sun}, giving mass-to-light ratio 200 -- 600 h M_{sun} / L_{sun}, and overdensity \delta \approx 4. The radially averaged smoothed density distribution around the PP is inputted to the Tolman-Bondi (TB) equations, calculated for different cosmologies: \Omega_0 = [0.1,1], \Omega_{\Lambda} = 1-\Omega_0 or 0. As a result we get the infall velocities towards the PP center. Comparing the TB results to the peculiar velocities measured for the Kinematics of the Local Universe (KLUN) Tully-Fisher data set we get the best fit for the conditions \Omega_0 = 0.2 -- 0.4 and v_{inf} < 100 km/s for the Local Group infall towards the center of PP. The applicability of the TB method in a complex environment, such as PP, is tested on an N-body simulation.