• The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation observatory for the study of very high-energy gamma rays from about 20 GeV up to 300 TeV. Thanks to the large effective area and field of view, the CTA observatory will be characterized by an unprecedented sensitivity to transient flaring gamma-ray phenomena compared to both current ground (e.g. MAGIC, VERITAS, H.E.S.S.) and space (e.g. Fermi) gamma-ray telescopes. In order to trigger the astrophysics community for follow-up observations, or being able to quickly respond to external science alerts, a fast analysis pipeline is crucial. This will be accomplished by means of a Real-Time Analysis (RTA) pipeline, a fast and automated science alert trigger system, becoming a key system of the CTA observatory. Among the CTA design key requirements to the RTA system, the most challenging is the generation of alerts within 30 seconds from the last acquired event, while obtaining a flux sensitivity not worse than the one of the final analysis by more than a factor of 3. A dedicated software and hardware architecture for the RTA pipeline must be designed and tested. We present comparison of OpenCL solutions using different kind of devices like CPUs, Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and Field Programmable Array (FPGA) cards for the Real-Time data reduction of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) triggered data.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in particular for the RTA) and the sensitivity requirements are challenging because of the large data rate, a few GByte/s. The remote connection to the CTA candidate site with a rather limited network bandwidth makes the issue of the exported data size extremely critical and prevents any kind of processing in real-time of the data outside the site of the telescopes. For these reasons the analysis will be performed on-site with infrastructures co-located with the telescopes, with limited electrical power availability and with a reduced possibility of human intervention. This means, for example, that the on-site hardware infrastructure should have low-power consumption. A substantial effort towards the optimization of high-throughput computing service is envisioned to provide hardware and software solutions with high-throughput, low-power consumption at a low-cost.
  • We report on the analysis of the data collected by Swift, INTEGRAL and RXTE of the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) 4U 1630-47 during 3 consecutive outbursts occurred in 2006, 2008 and 2010, respectively. We show that, although a similar spectral and temporal behaviour in the energy range between 2-10 keV, these 3 outbursts present pronounced differences above 20 keV. In fact, the 2010 outburst extends at high energies without any detectable cut-off until 150-200 keV, while the other two previous outbursts, occurred on 2006 and 2008, are not detected at all above 20 keV. Moreover, the 2008 outburst does not show any detectable hard state in its final phases and even during the 2010 outburst, the final hard state shows some peculiarities rarely observed in other BHC. We also investigate on the peculiar huge variation of 4U 1630-47 hydrogen column density (N$_{H}$) reported in the literature using the Swift/XRT data. In fact this instrument is one of the most suitable for this purpose thanks to its lower energy coverage.
  • On 2011 August 11, INTEGRAL discovered the hard X-ray source IGR J17361-4441 near the centre of the globular cluster NGC 6388. Follow up observations with Chandra showed the position of the transient was inconsistent with the cluster dynamical centre, and thus not related to its possible intermediate mass black hole. The source showed a peculiar hard spectrum (Gamma \approx 0.8) and no evidence of QPOs, pulsations, type-I bursts, or radio emission. Based on its peak luminosity, IGR J17361-4441 was classified as a very faint X-ray transient, and most likely a low-mass X-ray binary. We re-analysed 200 days of Swift/XRT observations, covering the whole outburst of IGR J17361-4441 and find a t^{-5/3} trend evident in the light curve, and a thermal emission component that does not evolve significantly with time. We investigate whether this source could be a tidal disruption event, and for certain assumptions find an accretion efficiency epsilon \approx 3.5E-04 (M_{Ch}/M) consistent with a massive white dwarf, and a disrupted minor body mass M_{mb}=1.9E+27(M/M_{Ch}) g in the terrestrial-icy planet regime. These numbers yield an inner disc temperature of the order kT_{in} \approx 0.04 keV, consistent with the blackbody temperature of kT_{in} \approx 0.08 keV estimated by spectral fitting. Although the density of white dwarfs and the number of free-floating planets are uncertain, we estimate the rate of planetary tidal disruptions in NGC 6388 to be in the range 3E-06 to 3E-04 yr^{-1}. Averaged over the Milky Way globular clusters, the upper limit value corresponds to 0.05 yr^{-1}, consistent with the observation of a single event by INTEGRAL and Swift.
  • We present here the main characteristics of the BHC IGR J17091-3624 outbursts occurred several times since 1994. Since 2003, the source has been extensively observed by INTEGRAL and Swift. In particular, we report results on the last 2011 outburst that showed a rare variability behaviour observed before only in the galactic BH GRS 1915+105 but at a different level of flux. Several hypotheses have been proposed in order to explain this particular behaviour. They are all discussed here, in the light of their apparent contradiction. Finally, based on all available informations, we attempt to give an overall view of this enigmatic source and we speculate on the evolutionary state of the binary system.
  • The different electron distributions in the hard and soft spectral states (HS and SS) of BH binaries could be caused by kinetic processes and changing because of varying physical conditions in the corona. In presence of a magnetic field in the corona, the electron distribution can appear thermal, even when acceleration mechanisms would produce non thermal distributions. This is due to fast and efficient thermalization through synchrotron self-absorption. We have analyzed data from 6 years of observations of Cygnus X-1 with the INTEGRAL observatory and produced 12 high-quality, stacked broad-band hard X-ray spectra representative of the whole range of spectral shapes observed. We then fit these spectra with hybrid thermal/non-thermal Comptonization models and study the evolution of the physical parameters of the accretion flow across the spectral transition. In particular, we use the BELM model to constrain the magnetic field in the corona through its effects on the coronal emission. Indeed, the hot electrons of the X-ray corona produce soft (optical-UV) synchrotron radiation which is then Comptonized and may affect the temperature of the electrons through Compton cooling. We find that in the SS, the emission is dominated by Comptonization of the disc photons and the magnetic field is at most of the order of 1E+06 G. In the hard states, the data are consistent with a pure synchrotron self-Compton model. If the non-thermal excess observed above a few hundred keV in the HS is produced in the same region as the bulk of the thermal Comptonization, we obtain an upper limit on the coronal magnetic field of about 1E+05 G. If, on the other hand, the non-thermal excess is produced in a different location, the constraints on the magnetic field in the HS are somewhat relaxed and the upper limit rises to 1E+07 G. We discuss these constraints in the context of current accretion flow models.
  • We report on the long-term monitoring campaign of the black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624 performed with INTEGRAL and Swift during the peculiar outburst started on January 2011. We have studied the two month spectral evolution of the source in detail. Unlike the previous outbursts, the initial transition from the hard to the soft state in 2011 was not followed by the standard spectral evolution expected for a transient black hole binary. IGR J17091-3624 showed pseudo periodic flare-like events in the light curve, closely resembling those observed from GRS 1915+105. We find evidence that these phenomena are due to the same physical instability process ascribed to GRS 1915+105. Finally we speculate that the faintness of IGR J17091-3624 could be not only due to the high distance of the source but to the high inclination angle of the system as well.
  • We investigate a model for the shallow decay phases of Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) afterglows discovered by Swift/XRT in the first hours following a GRB event. In the context of the fireball scenario, we consider the possibility that long-lived energy injection from a millisecond spinning, ultramagnetic neutron star (magnetar) powers afterglow emission during this phase. We consider the energy evolution in a relativistic shock subject to both radiative losses and energy injection from a spinning down magnetar in spherical symmetry. We model the energy injection term through magnetic dipole losses and discuss an approximate treatment for the dynamical evolution of the blastwave. We obtain an analytic solution for the energy evolution in the shock and associated lightcurves. To fully illustrate the potential of our solution we calculate lightcurves for a few selected X-ray afterglows observed by Swift and fit them using our theoretical lightcurves. Our solution naturally describes in a single picture the properties of the shallow decay phase and the transition to the so-called normal decay phase. In particular, we obtain remarkably good fits to X-ray afterglows for plausible parameters of the magnetar. Even though approximate, our treatment provides a step forward with respect to previously adopted approximations and provides additional support to the idea that a millisecond spinning (1-3 ms), ultramagnetic (B$\sim 10^{14}-10^{15}$ G) neutron star loosing spin energy through magnetic dipole radiation can explain the luminosity, durations and shapes of X-ray GRB afterglows.
  • The X-ray source SAXJ1712.6-3739 is a very weak Low Mass X-ray Binary discovered in 1999 with BeppoSAX and located in the Galactic Center. This region has been deeply investigated by the INTEGRAL satellite with an unprecedented exposure time, giving us an unique opportunity to study the hard X-ray behavior also for weak objects. The spectral results are based on the systematic analysis of all INTEGRAL observations covering the source position performed between February 2003 and October 2006. SAXJ1712.6-3739 did not shows any flux variation along this period as well as compared to previous BeppoSAX observation. Hence, to better constrain the physical parameters we combined both instrument data. Long INTEGRAL monitoring reveals, for the first time, that this X-ray burster is a weak persistent source, displaying a X-ray spectrum extended to high energy and spending most of the time in a low luminosity hard state. The broad-band spectrum is well modeled with a simple Comptonized model with a seed photons temperature of ~0.5keV and an electron temperature of ~24keV. The low mass accretion rate (~2x10^{-10} Msun/yr), the long bursts recurrence time, the small sizes of the region emitting the seed photons consisting with the inner disk radius and the high luminosity ratio in the 40-100keV and 20-40keV band, are all features common to the Ultra Compact source class.