• It is well known that galaxies falling into clusters can experience gas stripping due to ram-pressure by the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The most spectacular examples are galaxies with extended tails of optically-bright stripped material known as "jellyfish". We use the first large homogeneous compilation of jellyfish galaxies in clusters from the WINGS and OmegaWINGS surveys, and follow-up MUSE observations from the GASP MUSE programme to investigate the orbital histories of jellyfish galaxies in clusters and reconstruct their stripping history through position vs. velocity phase- space diagrams. We construct analytic models to define the regions in phase-space where ram-pressure stripping is at play. We then study the distribution of cluster galaxies in phase-space and find that jellyfish galaxies have on average higher peculiar velocities (and higher cluster velocity dispersion) than the overall population of cluster galaxies at all clustercentric radii, which is indicative of recent infall into the cluster and radial orbits. In particular, the jellyfish galaxies with the longest gas tails reside very near the cluster cores (in projection) and are moving at very high speeds, which coincides with the conditions of the most intense ram-pressure. We conclude that many of the jellyfish galaxies seen in clusters likely formed via fast (~1- 2 Gyr), incremental, outside-in ram-pressure stripping during first infall into the cluster in highly radial orbits.
  • Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the observable Universe. The knowledge of their properties provides many useful astrophysical and cosmological information. Our aim is to derive the luminosity and stellar mass profiles of the nearby galaxy clusters of the Omega-WINGS survey and to study the main scaling relations valid for such systems. We have merged the data of the WINGS and Omega-WINGS databases, sorted the sources according to the distance from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and calculated the integrated luminosity profiles in the $B$ and $V$ bands, taking into account extinction, photometric and spatial completeness, K-correction and background contribution. Then, by exploiting the spectroscopic sample we derived the stellar mass profiles of the clusters. We got the luminosity profiles of 46 galaxy clusters, reaching $r_{200}$ in 30 cases, and the stellar mass profiles of 42 of our objects. We successfully fitted all the integrated luminosity growth profiles with one or two embedded S\'ersic components, deriving the main clusters parameters. Finally, we checked the main scaling relation among the clusters parameters in comparison with those obtained for a selected sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the same clusters. We found that the nearby galaxy clusters are non-homologous structures like ETGs and exhibit a color-magnitude (CM) red-sequence relation very similar to that observed for galaxies in clusters. These properties are not expected in the current cluster formation scenarios. In particular the existence of a CM relation for clusters, shown here for the first time, suggests that the baryonic structures grow and evolve in a similar way at all scales.
  • The so-called jellyfish galaxies are objects exhibiting disturbed morphology, mostly in the form of tails of gas stripped from the main body of the galaxy. Several works have strongly suggested ram pressure stripping to be the mechanism driving this phenomenon. Here, we focus on one of these objects, drawn from a sample of optically selected jellyfish galaxies, and use it to validate SINOPSIS, the spectral fitting code that will be used for the analysis of the GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) survey, and study the spatial distribution and physical properties of gas and stellar populations in this galaxy. We compare the model spectra to those obtained with GANDALF, a code with similar features widely used to interpret the kinematic of stars and gas in galaxies from IFU data. We find that SINOPSIS can reproduce the pixel-by-pixel spectra of this galaxy at least as good as GANDALF does, providing reliable estimates of the underlying stellar absorption to properly correct the nebular gas emission. Using these results, we find strong evidences of a double effect of ram pressure exerted by the intracluster medium onto the gas of the galaxy. A moderate burst of star formation, dating between 20 and 500 Myr ago and involving the outer parts of the galaxy more strongly than the inner regions, was likely induced by a first interaction of the galaxy with the intracluster medium. Stripping by ram pressure, plus probable gas depletion due to star formation, contributed to create a truncated ionized gas disk. The presence of an extended stellar tail on only one side of the disk, points instead to another kind of process, likely a gravitational interaction by a fly-by or a close encounter with another galaxy in the cluster.
  • In the context of the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with Muse (GASP) survey, we present the characterization of JO204, a jellyfish galaxy in A957, a relatively low-mass cluster with $M=4.4 \times10^{14}M_\odot$. This galaxy shows a tail of ionized gas that extends up to 30 kpc from the main body in the opposite direction of the cluster center. No gas emission is detected in the galaxy outer disk, suggesting that gas stripping is proceeding outside-in. The stellar component is distributed as a regular disk galaxy; the stellar kinematics shows a symmetric rotation curve with a maximum radial velocity of 200km/s out to 20 kpc from the galaxy center. The radial velocity of the gas component in the central part of the disk follows the distribution of the stellar component; the gas kinematics in the tail retains the rotation of the galaxy disk, indicating that JO204 is moving at high speed in the intracluster medium. Both the emission and radial velocity maps of the gas and stellar components indicate ram-pressure as the most likely primary mechanism for gas stripping, as expected given that JO204 is close to the cluster center and it is likely at the first infall in the cluster. The spatially resolved star formation history of JO204 provides evidence that the onset of ram-pressure stripping occurred in the last 500 Myr, quenching the star formation activity in the outer disk, where the gas has been already completely stripped. Our conclusions are supported by a set of hydrodynamic simulations.
  • When supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies accrete matter (usually gas), they give rise to highly energetic phenomena named Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). A number of physical processes have been proposed to account for the funneling of gas towards the galaxy centers to feed the AGN. There are also several physical processes that can strip gas from a galaxy, and one of them is ram pressure stripping in galaxy clusters due to the hot and dense gas filling the space between galaxies. We report the discovery of a strong connection between severe ram pressure stripping and the presence of AGN activity. Searching in galaxy clusters at low redshift, we have selected the most extreme examples of jellyfish galaxies, which are galaxies with long tentacles of material extending for dozens of kpc beyond the galaxy disk. Using the MUSE spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope, we find that 6 out of the 7 galaxies of this sample host a central AGN, and two of them also have galactic-scale AGN ionization cones. The high incidence of AGN among the most striking jellyfishes may be due to ram pressure causing gas to flow towards the center and triggering the AGN activity, or to an enhancement of the stripping caused by AGN energy injection, or both. Our analysis of the galaxy position and velocity relative to the cluster strongly supports the first hypothesis, and puts forward ram pressure as another, yet unforeseen, possible mechanism for feeding the central supermassive black hole with gas.
  • Within the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE (GASP) sample, we identified an ongoing merger between two galaxies in a poor group at $z = 0.05043$. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of gas and stars of this object and describe its evolutionary history. An old (luminosity weighted age $\rm \sim 2\times 10^9 \, yr$), gas poor, early-type-like galaxy is merging with a younger (luminosity weighted age $\rm \sim 2.5\times 10^8 \, yr$), gas rich, late-type galaxy. The system has a quite strong metallicity gradient, indicative of an early-stage phase. Comparing the spatial extension of the star formation at different epochs, we can date the beginning of the merging between $\rm 2\times 10^7 yr <t<5.7\times 10^8 yr$ ago. The gas kinematic pattern reflects the gas of the late-type object and is distorted mainly in correspondence to the location of the impact, while the northern regions had not time to be noticeably influenced yet. The stellar kinematic instead is much more chaotic, as expected in case of mergers. The gas redistribution in the system induces high levels of star formation between the two components, especially in the region of the impact, where we detect the formation of a tidal dwarf galaxy. This stellar structure has a mass of $\sim 6\times 10^9 M_\odot$ and a radius of $\rm \sim 2 \, kpc$ and, even though it has already accreted large quantities of gas and stars, it is still located within the disk of the progenitor, is characterized by a high velocity dispersion, indication that it is still forming, is dusty and has high levels of star formation (SFR$\sim 0.3 M_\odot \, yr^{-1}$). This tidal dwarf is originated in an early-stage merger, while these stellar structures usually form in more evolved systems. [Abridged]
  • [Abridged] We use the WINGS database to select a sample of 67 nearby galaxy clusters with at least 30 spectroscopic members each. 53 of these clusters do not show evidence of substructures in phase-space, while 14 do. We estimate the virial radii and circular velocities of the 67 clusters by a variety of proxies (velocity dispersion, X-ray temperature, and richness) and use these estimates to build stack samples from these 53 and 14 clusters ('Reg' and 'Irr' stacks, respectively). We determine the number-density and velocity-dispersion profiles (VDPs) of E, S0, and Sp+Irr (S) galaxies in the Reg and Irr samples, separately, and fit models to these profiles. The number density profiles of E, S0, and S galaxies are adequately described by either a NFW or a cored King model, both for the Reg and Irr samples, with a slight preference for the NFW model. The spatial distribution concentration increases from the S to the S0 and to the E populations, both in the Reg and the Irr stacks, reflecting the well-known morphology-radius relation. Reg clusters have a more concentrated spatial distribution of E and S0 galaxies than Irr clusters, while the spatial distributions of S galaxies in Reg and Irr clusters are similar. We propose a new phenomenological model that provides acceptable fits to the VDP of all our galaxy samples. The VDPs become steeper and with a higher normalization from E to S0 to S galaxies. The S0 VDP is close to that of E galaxies in Reg clusters, and intermediate between those of E and S galaxies in Irr clusters. Our results suggest that S galaxies are a recently accreted cluster population, that take less than 3 Gyr to evolve into S0 galaxies after accretion, and in doing so modify their phase-space distribution, approaching that of cluster ellipticals. While in Reg clusters this evolutionary process is mostly completed, it is still ongoing in Irr clusters.
  • GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) is a new integral-field spectroscopic survey with MUSE at the VLT aiming at studying gas removal processes in galaxies. We present an overview of the survey and show a first example of a galaxy undergoing strong gas stripping. GASP is obtaining deep MUSE data for 114 galaxies at z=0.04-0.07 with stellar masses in the range 10^9.2-10^11.5 M_sun in different environments (galaxy clusters and groups, over more than four orders of magnitude in halo mass). GASP targets galaxies with optical signatures of unilateral debris or tails reminiscent of gas stripping processes ("jellyfish galaxies"), as well as a control sample of disk galaxies with no morphological anomalies. GASP is the only existing Integral Field Unit (IFU) survey covering both the main galaxy body and the outskirts and surroundings, where the IFU data can reveal the presence and the origin of the outer gas. To demonstrate GASP's ability to probe the physics of gas and stars, we show the complete analysis of a textbook case of a "jellyfish" galaxy, JO206. This is a massive galaxy (9 x 10^10 M_sun in a low-mass cluster (sigma ~500 km/s), at a small projected clustercentric radius and a high relative velocity, with >=90kpc-long tentacles of ionized gas stripped away by ram pressure. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of gas and stars, and depict the evolutionary history of this galaxy.
  • The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\ast>10^{9.8}M_\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04<z<0.07$. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02$<$z$<$0.09 as field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M$_*$ relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M$_*$ main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity and mass weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.
  • We analyze the star formation history (SFH) of galaxies as a function of present-day environment, galaxy stellar mass and morphology. The SFH is derived by means of a non-parametric spectrophotometric model applied to individual galaxies at z ~ 0.04- 0.1 in the WINGS clusters and the PM2GC field. The field reconstructed evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) follows the values observed at each redshift (Madau & Dickinson 2014), except at z > 2 where our estimate is ~ 1.7x higher than the high-z observed value. The slope of the SFRD decline with time gets progressively steeper going from low mass to high mass haloes. The decrease of the SFRD since z = 2 is due to 1) quenching - 50% of the SFRD in the field and 75% in clusters at z > 2 originated in galaxies that are passive today - and 2) the fact that the average SFR of today's star-forming galaxies has decreased with time. We quantify the contribution to the SFRD(z) of galaxies of today's different masses and morphologies. The current morphology correlates with the current star formation activity but is irrelevant for the past stellar history. The average SFH depends on galaxy mass, but galaxies of a given mass have different histories depending on their environment. We conclude that the variation of the SFRD(z) with environment is not driven by different distributions of galaxy masses and morphologies in clusters and field, and must be due to an accelerated formation in high mass haloes compared to low mass ones even for galaxies that will end up having the same galaxy mass today.
  • Exploiting a mass complete (M_*>10^(10.25)M_sun) sample at 0.03<z<0.11 drawn from the Padova Millennium Galaxy Group Catalog (PM2GC), we use the (U-B)_rf color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star formation activity and/or morphology - green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment, and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of SFR in both bulges and disks which does not noticeably affect galaxy structure. Morphological transitions are linked to an enhanced bulge-to-disk ratio due to the removal of the disk, not to an increase of the bulge. Our modeling suggests that green colors might be due to star formation histories declining with long timescales, as an alternative scenario to the classical "quenching" processes. Our results suggest that galaxy transformations in star formation activity and morphology depend neither on environment nor on being a satellite or the most massive galaxy of a halo. The only environmental dependence we find is the higher fast quenching efficiency in groups giving origin to post-starburst signatures.
  • In this paper we introduce a parameter dependent class of Krylov-based methods, namely CD, for the solution of symmetric linear systems. We give evidence that in our proposal we generate sequences of conjugate directions, extending some properties of the standard Conjugate Gradient (CG) method, in order to preserve the conjugacy. For specific values of the parameters in our framework we obtain schemes equivalent to both the CG and the scaled-CG. We also prove the finite convergence of the algorithms in CD, and we provide some error analysis. Finally, preconditioning is introduced for CD, and we show that standard error bounds for the preconditioned CG also hold for the preconditioned CD.
  • We study the galaxy stellar mass function in different environments in the local Universe, considering both the total mass function and that of individual galaxy morphological types. We compare the mass functions of galaxies with $\rm log_{10} M_{\star}/M_{\odot} \geq 10.25$ in the general field and in galaxy groups, binary and single galaxy systems from the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue at $z=0.04-0.1$ with the mass function of galaxy clusters of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-Cluster Survey at $z=0.04-0.07$. Strikingly, the variations of the mass function with global environment, overall, are small and subtle. The shapes of the mass functions of the general field and clusters are indistinguishable, and only small, statistically insignificant variations are allowed in groups. Only the mass function of our single galaxies, representing the least massive haloes and comprising less than a third of the general field population, is proportionally richer in low-mass galaxies than other environments. The most notable environmental effect is a progressive change in the upper galaxy mass, with very massive galaxies found only in the most massive environments. This environment-dependent mass cut-off is unable to affect the Schechter parameters and the K-S test, and can only be revealed by an ad-hoc analysis. Finally, we show how, in each given environment, the mass function changes with morphological type, and that galaxies of the same morphological type can have different mass functions in different environments.
  • We present a study of galaxy sizes in the local Universe as a function of galaxy environment, comparing clusters and the general field. Galaxies with radii and masses comparable to high-z massive and compact galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies more massive than 3 X 10^{10} M_sun in the field. Such galaxies are 3 times more frequent in clusters than in the field. Most of them are early-type galaxies with intermediate to old stellar populations. There is a trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. We show the relation between size and luminosity-weighted age for galaxies of different stellar masses and in different environments. We compare with high-z data to quantify the evolution of galaxy sizes. We find that, once the progenitor bias due to the relation between galaxy size and stellar age is removed, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, of the order of a factor 1.6.
  • We use \sim 2000 galaxies belonging to different environments to show how the fractions of different galaxy morphological types vary with global environment and as function of galaxy stellar mass at low redshift. Considering mass limited galaxy samples with log10 M\star/M\bigodot>= 10.25, we find a smooth increase/decline in the fraction of Es-S0s/late type galaxies going from single galaxies, to binaries, to groups. Considering all environments, the fractional variation is more conspicuous for S0s and late-types than for ellipticals solely due to a sharp enhancement/dearth of S0s/late-types in clusters compared to other environments. The morphological distribution of galaxies in the mass range 10.25 < log10 M\star/M\bigodot < 11 is rather independent both of galaxy stellar mass and global environment, except in clusters. The morphologies of galaxies more massive than log10 M\star/M\bigodot = 11 are instead a function of both galaxy mass and global environment. The morphology-mass relation therefore changes with global environment, showing that galaxy stellar mass cannot be the only parameter driving the morphological distribution of galaxies. The morphology-mass relations for S0 and late-type galaxies in clusters are peculiar compared to other environments, and this strongly suggests that cluster-specific effects act on these two types of galaxies, and that a significant number of S0s in clusters has a different origin with respect to S0s in other environments.
  • We present the ellipticity distribution and its evolution for early-type galaxies in clusters from z~0.8 to z~0, based on the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS)(0.04<z<0.07), and the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS)(0.4<z<0.8). We first investigate a mass limited sample and we find that, above a fixed mass limit, the ellipticity distribution of early-types noticeably evolves with redshift. In the local Universe there are proportionally more galaxies with higher ellipticity, hence flatter, than in distant clusters. This evolution is due partly to the change of the mass distribution and mainly to the change of the morphological mix with z (among the early types, the fraction of ellipticals goes from ~70% at high to ~40% at low-z). Analyzing separately the ellipticity distribution of the different morphological types, we find no evolution both for ellipticals and S0s. However, for ellipticals a change with redshift in the median value of the distributions is detected. This is due to a larger population of very round (e<0.05) elliptical galaxies at low-z. To compare our finding to previous studies, we also assemble a magnitude-"delimited" sample that consists of early-type galaxies on the red sequence with -19.3>M_B+1.208z>-21. Analyzing this sample, we do not recover exactly the same results of the mass-limited sample. Hence the selection criteria are crucial to characterize the galaxy properties: the choice of the magnitude-delimited sample implies the loss of many less massive galaxies and so it biases the final results. Moreover, although we are adopting the same selection criteria, our results in the magnitude-delimited sample are also not in agreement with those of Holden et al.(2009). This is due to the fact that our and their low-z samples have a different magnitude distribution because the Holden et al.(2009) sample suffers from incompleteness at faint magnitudes.
  • We quantify the evolution of the spiral, S0 and elliptical fractions in galaxy clusters as a function of cluster velocity dispersion ($\sigma$) and X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) using a new database of 72 nearby clusters from the WIde-Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) combined with literature data at $z=0.5-1.2$. Most WINGS clusters have $\sigma$ between 500 and 1100 $\rm km s^{-1}$, and $L_X$ between 0.2 and $5 \times 10^{44} \rm erg/s$. The S0 fraction in clusters is known to increase with time at the expense of the spiral population. We find that the spiral and S0 fractions have evolved more strongly in lower $\sigma$, less massive clusters, while we confirm that the proportion of ellipticals has remained unchanged. Our results demonstrate that morphological evolution since $z=1$ is not confined to massive clusters, but is actually more pronounced in low mass clusters, and therefore must originate either from secular (intrinsic) evolution and/or from environmental mechanisms that act preferentially in low-mass environments, or both in low- and high-mass systems. We also find that the evolution of the spiral fraction perfectly mirrors the evolution of the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, at low-z the spiral fraction anticorrelates with $L_X$. Conversely, no correlation is observed with $\sigma$. Given that both $\sigma$ and $L_X$ are tracers of the cluster mass, these results pose a challenge for current scenarios of morphological evolution in clusters.
  • We have studied the evolution of galaxian morphologies from ground-based, good-seeing images of 9 clusters at z=0.09-0.25. The comparison of our data with those relative to higher redshift clusters (Dressler et al. 1997) allowed us to trace for the first time the evolution of the morphological mix at a look-back time of 2-4 Gyr, finding a dependence of the observed evolutionary trends on the cluster properties.
  • We present the results of the detailed surface photometry of a sample of elliptical galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field. In the (surface_brightness-effective_radius) plane, the elliptical galaxies of the HDF turn out to follow a `rest frame' Kormendy relation, once the appropriate K+E corrections are applied. This evidence, linked to the dynamical information gathered by Steidel et al. (1996), indicates that these galaxies, even at z ~ 2-3, lie in the Fundamental Plane, in a virial equilibrium condition. At the same redshifts a statistically signifcant lack of large galaxies [i.e. with log r_e(kpc) > 0.2] is observed.