• We build a cartesian closed category, called Cho, based on event structures. It allows an interpretation of higher-order stateful concurrent programs that is refined and precise: on the one hand it is conservative with respect to standard Hyland-Ong games when interpreting purely functional programs as innocent strategies, while on the other hand it is much more expressive. The interpretation of programs constructs compositionally a representation of their execution that exhibits causal dependencies and remembers the points of non-deterministic branching.The construction is in two stages. First, we build a compact closed category Tcg. It is a variant of Rideau and Winskel's category CG, with the difference that games and strategies in Tcg are equipped with symmetry to express that certain events are essentially the same. This is analogous to the underlying category of AJM games enriching simple games with an equivalence relations on plays. Building on this category, we construct the cartesian closed category Cho as having as objects the standard arenas of Hyland-Ong games, with strategies, represented by certain events structures, playing on games with symmetry obtained as expanded forms of these arenas.To illustrate and give an operational light on these constructions, we interpret (a close variant of) Idealized Parallel Algol in Cho.
  • We introduce the notion of a relative pseudomonad, which generalises the notion of a pseudomonad, and define the Kleisli bicategory associated to a relative pseudomonad. We then present an efficient method to define pseudomonas on the Kleisli bicategory of a relative pseudomonad. The results are applied to define several pseudomonads on the bicategory of profunctors in an homogeneous way, thus providing a uniform approach to the definition of bicategories that are of interest in operad theory, mathematical logic, and theoretical computer science.
  • In 2011, Rideau and Winskel introduced concurrent games and strategies as event structures, generalizing prior work on causal formulations of games. In this paper we give a detailed, self-contained and slightly-updated account of the results of Rideau and Winskel: a notion of pre-strategy based on event structures; a characterisation of those pre-strategies (deemed strategies) which are preserved by composition with a copycat strategy; and the construction of a bicategory of these strategies. Furthermore, we prove that the corresponding category has a compact closed structure, and hence forms the basis for the semantics of concurrent higher-order computation.
  • In a distributed game we imagine a team Player engaging a team Opponent in a distributed fashion. Such games and their strategies have been formalised in concurrent games based on event structures. However there are limitations in founding strategies on traditional event structures. Sometimes a probabilistic distributed strategy relies on certain benign races where, intuitively, several members of team Player may race each other to make a common move. Although there are event structures which support such parallel causes, in which an event is enabled in several compatible ways, they do not support an operation of hiding central to the composition of strategies; nor do they support probability adequately. An extension of traditional event structures is devised which supports parallel causes and hiding, as well as the mix of probability and nondeterminism needed to account for probabilistic distributed strategies. The extension is tested in the construction of a bicategory of probabilistic distributed strategies with parallel causes. The bicategory is rich in operations relevant to probabilistic as well as deterministic parallel programming.
  • A summary of work on distributed games and strategies done within the first three years of the ERC project ECSYM is presented.
  • The aim of the workshop series Developments in Computational Models (DCM) is to bring together researchers who are currently developing new computational models or new features for traditional computational models, in order to foster their interaction, to provide a forum for presenting new ideas and work in progress, and to enable newcomers to learn about current activities in this area. The eighth workshop in the series, DCM 2012, was part of the celebrations of the Turing Centenary and was held as a satellite event of the Turing centenary conference Computability in Europe 2012 (CiE 2012) in Cambridge. It took place at Corpus Christi College in Cambridge on Sunday, 17 June 2013. This electronic proceedings volume includes one of the keynote papers as well as revised versions of papers accepted for presentation by the programme committee.
  • A compositional Petri net-based semantics is given to a simple language allowing pointer manipulation and parallelism. The model is then applied to give a notion of validity to the judgements made by concurrent separation logic that emphasizes the process-environment duality inherent in such rely-guarantee reasoning. Soundness of the rules of concurrent separation logic with respect to this definition of validity is shown. The independence information retained by the Petri net model is then exploited to characterize the independence of parallel processes enforced by the logic. This is shown to permit a refinement operation capable of changing the granularity of atomic actions.