• The recently discovered brown dwarf WISE 0855 presents our first opportunity to directly study an object outside the Solar System that is nearly as cold as our own gas giant planets. However the traditional methodology for characterizing brown dwarfs---near infrared spectroscopy---is not currently feasible as WISE 0855 is too cold and faint. To characterize this frozen extrasolar world we obtained a 4.5-5.2 $\mu$m spectrum, the same bandpass long used to study Jupiter's deep thermal emission. Our spectrum reveals the presence of atmospheric water vapor and clouds, with an absorption profile that is strikingly similar to Jupiter. The spectrum is high enough quality to allow the investigation of dynamical and chemical processes that have long been studied in Jupiter's atmosphere, but now on an extrasolar world.
  • This white paper is submitted to the Astronomy and Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey (Astro2010)1 Committee on the State of the Profession to emphasize the potential of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) to contribute to the training of instrumentalists and observers, and to related technology developments. This potential goes beyond the primary mission of SOFIA, which is to carry out unique, high priority astronomical research. SOFIA is a Boeing 747SP aircraft with a 2.5 meter telescope. It will enable astronomical observations anywhere, any time, and at most wavelengths between 0.3 microns and 1.6 mm not accessible from ground-based observatories. These attributes, accruing from the mobility and flight altitude of SOFIA, guarantee a wealth of scientific return. Its instrument teams (nine in the first generation) and guest investigators will do suborbital astronomy in a shirt-sleeve environment. The project will invest $10M per year in science instrument development over a lifetime of 20 years. This, frequent flight opportunities, and operation that enables rapid changes of science instruments and hands-on in-flight access to the instruments, assure a unique and extensive potential - both for training young instrumentalists and for encouraging and deploying nascent technologies. Novel instruments covering optical, infrared, and submillimeter bands can be developed for and tested on SOFIA by their developers (including apprentices) for their own observations and for those of guest observers, to validate technologies and maximize observational effectiveness.
  • We have searched for a methane signature in the infrared spectrum of tau Bootis, produced by the planetary companion. The observations comprise 598 low-noise, high resolution spectra near 3.28 microns, which we analyze by cross-correlating with a modeled planetary spectrum based on the work of Burrows and Sharp (1999), and Sudarsky et al. (2000). The 3-sigma random noise level of our analysis is 0.00006 stellar continuum flux units, and the confusion noise limit - measuring the resemblence of a cross-correlation feature to the spectrum of methane - is 0.00025. We find a significant cross-correlation amplitude of 0.00033 continuum units at a velocity near that of the star. This is likely due to methane from a low-mass companion in a long-period orbit. Fischer, Butler and Marcy (2000) report a long-term velocity drift indicative of such a companion. But the system is known to be a visual binary with an eccentric orbit, and is rapidly approaching periastron. Whether the visual companion can account for our observations and the Fischer et al. velocity drift depends on knowing the orbit more precisely. The stability of planetary orbits in this system also depends crucially on the properties of the binary orbit. A second cross-correlation feature, weaker and much more diffuse, has intensity amplitude 0.0002 continuum units and occurs at a velocity amplitude of 71 +/-10 km/sec, in agreement with the orbit claimed for the planet by Cameron et al. (1999). Like the first feature, it has passed several tests designed to reject systematic errors. We discuss the possibility that this second feature is due to the planet.