• Dwarf galaxies and globular clusters may contain intermediate mass black holes ($10^{3}$ to $10^{5}$ solar masses) in their cores. Estimates of ~$10^{3}$ neutron stars in the central parsec of the Galaxy and similar numbers in small elliptical galaxies and globular clusters along with an estimated high probability of ms-pulsar formation in those environments has led many workers to propose the use of ms-pulsar timing to measure the mass and spin of intermediate mass black holes. Models of pulsar motion around a rotating black hole generally assume geodesic motion of a "test" particle in the Kerr metric. These approaches account for well-known effects like de Sitter precession and the Lense-Thirring effect but they do not account for the non-linear effect of the pulsar's stress-energy tensor on the space-time metric. Here we model the motion of a pulsar near a black hole with the Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon (MPD) equations. Numerical integration of the MPD equations for black holes of mass 2 X $10^{6}$, $10^{5}$ and $10^{3}$ solar masses shows that the pulsar will not remain in an orbital plane with motion vertical to the plane being largest relative to the orbit's radial dimensions for the lower mass black holes. The pulsar's out of plane motion will lead to timing variations that are up to ~10 microseconds different from those predicted by planar orbit models. Such variations might be detectable in long term observations of millisecond pulsars. If pulsar signals are used to measure the mass and spin of intermediate mass black holes on the basis of dynamical models of the received pulsar signal then the out of plane motion of the pulsar should be part of that model.
  • We searched for long period variation in V-band, Ic-band and RXTE X-ray light curves of the High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) LS 1698 / RX J1037.5-5647, HD 110432 / 1H 1249-637 and HD 161103 / RX J1744.7-2713 in an attempt to discover orbitally induced variation. Data were obtained primarily from the ASAS database and were supplemented by shorter term observations made with the 24- and 40-inch ANU telescopes and one of the robotic PROMPT telescopes. Fourier periodograms suggested the existence of long period variation in the V-band light curves of all three HMXBs, however folding the data at those periods did not reveal convincing periodic variation. At this point we cannot rule out the existence of long term V-band variation for these three sources and hints of longer term variation may be seen in the higher precision PROMPT data. Long term V-band observations, on the order of several years, taken at a frequency of at least once per week and with a precision of 0.01 mag, therefore still have a chance of revealing long term variation in these three HMXBs.
  • The results of a coordinated space-based photometric and ground-based spectroscopic observing campaign on the enigmatic gamma-ray binary LS 5039 are reported. Sixteen days of observations from the MOST satellite have been combined with high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy from the 2.3m ANU Telescope in Siding Spring, Australia. These observations were used to measure the orbital parameters of the binary and to study the properties of stellar wind from the O primary. We found that any broad-band optical photometric variability at the orbital period is below the 2 mmag level, supporting the scenario that the orbital eccentricity of the system is near the 0.24 +/- 0.08 value implied by our spectroscopy, which is lower than values previously obtained by other workers. The low amplitude optical variability also implies the component masses are at the higher end of estimates based on the primary's O6.5V((f)) spectral type with a primary mass of ~26 solar masses and a mass for the compact star of at least 1.8 solar masses. The mass loss rate from the O primary was determined to be 3.7E-7 to 4.8E-7 solar masses per year.
  • The high-mass X-ray binary RX J0146.9+6121, with optical counterpart LS I+61 235 (V831 Cas), is an intriguing system on the outskirts of the open cluster NGC 663. It contains the slowest X-ray pulsar known with a pulse period of around 1400s and, primarily from the study of variation in the emission line profile of H alpha, it is known to have a Be decretion disk with a one-armed density wave period of approximately 1240d. Here we present the results of an extensive photometric campaign, supplemented with optical spectroscopy, aimed at measuring short time-scale periodicities. We find three significant periodicities in the photometric data at, in order of statistical significance, 0.34d, 0.67d and 0.10d. We give arguments to support the interpretation that the 0.34d and 0.10d periods could be due to stellar oscillations of the B type primary star and that the 0.67d period is the spin period of the Be star with a spin axis inclination of 23 +10 -8 degrees. We measured a systemic velocity of -37.0 +- 4.3 km/s confirming that LS I+61 235 has a high probability of membership in the young cluster NGC 663 from which the system's age can be estimated as 20-25 Myr. From archival RXTE ASM data we further find "super" X-ray outbursts roughly every 450d. If these super outbursts are caused by the alignment of the compact star with the one-armed decretion disk enhancement, then the orbital period is approximately 330d.
  • The temperatures of electrons and ions in the post-shock accretion region of a magnetic cataclysmic variable (mCV) will be equal at sufficiently high mass flow rates or for sufficiently weak magnetic fields. At lower mass flow rates or in stronger magnetic fields, efficient cyclotron cooling will cool the electrons faster than the electrons can cool the ions and a two-temperature flow will result. Here we investigate the differences in polarized radiation expected from mCV post-shock accretion columns modeled with one- and two-temperature hydrodynamics. In an mCV model with one accretion region, a magnetic field >~30 MG and a specific mass flow rate of ~0.5 g/cm/cm/s, along with a relatively generic geometric orientation of the system, we find that in the ultraviolet either a single linear polarization pulse per binary orbit or two pulses per binary orbit can be expected, depending on the accretion column hydrodynamic structure (one- or two-temperature) modeled. Under conditions where the physical flow is two-temperature, one pulse per orbit is predicted from a single accretion region where a one-temperature model predicts two pulses. The intensity light curves show similar pulse behavior but there is very little difference between the circular polarization predictions of one- and two-temperature models. Such discrepancies indicate that it is important to model some aspect of two-temperature flow in indirect imaging procedures, like Stokes imaging, especially at the edges of extended accretion regions, were the specific mass flow is low, and especially for ultraviolet data.
  • This is a call for amateur astronomers who have the equipment and experience for producing high quality photometry to contribute to a program of finding periods in the optical light curves of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). HMXBs are binary stars in which the lighter star is a neutron star or a black hole and the more massive star is an O type supergiant or a Be type main sequence star. Matter is transferred from the ordinary star to the compact object and X-rays are produced as the the gravitational energy of the accreting gas is converted into light. HMXBs are very bright, many are brighter than 10th magnitude, and so make perfect targets for experienced amateur astronomers with photometry capable CCD equipment coupled with almost any size telescope.
  • The ratios of hydrogen Balmer emission line intensities in cataclysmic variables are signatures of the physical processes that produce them. To quantify those signatures relative to classifications of cataclysmic variable types, we applied the multivariate statistical analysis methods of principal components analysis and discriminant function analysis to the spectroscopic emission data set of Williams (1983). The two analysis methods reveal two different sources of variation in the ratios of the emission lines. The source of variation seen in the principal components analysis was shown to be correlated with the binary orbital period. The source of variation seen in the discriminant function analysis was shown to be correlated with the equivalent width of the H$\beta$ line. Comparison of the data scatterplot with scatterplots of theoretical models shows that Balmer line emission from T CrB systems is consistent with the photoionization of a surrounding nebula. Otherwise, models that we considered do not reproduce the wide range of Balmer decrements, including "inverted" decrements, seen in the data.