• Despite a well-ordered pyrochlore crystal structure and strong magnetic interactions between the Dy$^{3+}$ or Ho$^{3+}$ ions, no long range magnetic order has been detected in the pyrochlore titanates Ho$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ and Dy$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$. To explore the actual magnetic phase formed by cooling these materials, we measure their magnetization dynamics using toroidal, boundary-free magnetization transport techniques. We find that the dynamical magnetic susceptibility of both compounds has the same distinctive phenomenology, that is indistinguishable in form from that of the dielectric permittivity of dipolar glass-forming liquids. Moreover, Ho$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ and Dy$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ both exhibit microscopic magnetic relaxation times that increase along the super-Arrhenius trajectories analogous to those observed in glass-forming dipolar liquids. Thus, upon cooling below about 2K, Dy$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ and Ho$_2$Ti$_2$O$_7$ both appear to enter the same magnetic state exhibiting the characteristics of a glass-forming spin-liquid.
  • We use neutron diffraction and muon spin relaxation to study the effect of in-plane uniaxial pressure on the antiferromagnetic (AF) orthorhombic phase in BaFe$_2$As$_2$ and its Co- and Ni-substituted members near optimal superconductivity. In the low temperature AF ordered state, uniaxial pressure necessary to detwin the orthorhombic crystals also increases the magnetic ordered moment, reaching an 11$\%$ increase under 40 MPa for BaFe$_{1.9}$Co$_{0.1}$As$_2$, and a 15$\%$ increase for BaFe$_{1.915}$Ni$_{0.085}$As$_2$. We also observe an increase of the AF ordering temperature ($T_N$) of about 0.25 K/MPa in all compounds, consistent with density functional theory calculations that reveal better Fermi surface nesting for itinerant electrons under uniaxial pressure. The doping dependence of the magnetic ordered moment is captured by combining dynamical mean field theory with density functional theory, suggesting that the pressure-induced moment increase near optimal superconductivity is closely related to quantum fluctuations and the nearby electronic nematic phase.
  • Metal-to-insulator transitions (MITs) are a dramatic manifestation of strong electron correlations in solids1. The insulating phase can often be suppressed by quantum tuning, i.e. varying a nonthermal parameter such as chemical composi- tion or pressure, resulting in a zero-temperature quantum phase transition (QPT) to a metallic state driven by quantum fluctuations, in contrast to conventional phase transitions driven by thermal fluctuations. Theories of exotic phenomena known to occur near the Mott QPT such as quantum criticality and high-temperature superconductivity often assume a second-order QPT, but direct experimental evidence for either first- or second-order behavior at the magnetic QPT associated with the Mott transition has been scarce and further masked by the superconducting phase in unconventional superconductors. Most measurements of QPTs have been performed by volume-integrated probes, such as neutron scattering, magnetization, and transport, in which discontinuous behavior, phase separation, and spatially inhomogeneous responses are averaged and smeared out, leading at times to misidentification as continuous second-order transitions. Here, we demonstrate through muon spin relaxation/rotation (MuSR) experiments on two archetypal Mott insulating systems, composition-tuned RENiO3 (RE=rare earth element) and pressured-tuned V2O3, that the QPT from antiferromagnetic insulator to paramagnetic metal is first-order: the magnetically ordered volume fraction decreases to zero at the QPT, resulting in a broad region of intrinsic phase separation, while the ordered magnetic moment retains its full value across the phase diagram until it is suddenly destroyed at the QPT. These findings call for further investigation into the role of inelastic soft modes and the nature of dynamic spin and charge fluctuations underlying the transition.
  • We report the transport, thermodynamic, $\mu$SR and neutron study of the Ca$_{0.74(1)}$La$_{0.26(1)}$(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)As$_{2}$ single crystals, mapping out the temperature-doping level phase diagram. Upon Co substitution on the Fe site, the structural/magnetic phase transitions in this 112 compound are suppressed and superconductivity up to 20 K occurs. Our measurements of the superconducting and magnetic volume fractions show that these two phases coexist microscopically in the underdoped region, in contrast to the related 10-3-8 Ca$_{10}$(Pt$_{3}$As$_{8}$)((Fe$_{1-x}$Pt$_x$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$)$_{5}$ compound, where coexistence is absent. Supported by model calculations, we discuss the differences in the phase diagrams of the 112 and 10-3-8 compounds in terms of the FeAs interlayer coupling, whose strength is affected by the character of the spacer layer, which is metallic in the 112 and insulating in the 10-3-8.
  • A "supercooled" liquid develops when a fluid does not crystallize upon cooling below its ordering temperature. Instead, the microscopic relaxation times diverge so rapidly that, upon further cooling, equilibration eventually becomes impossible and glass formation occurs. Classic supercooled liquids exhibit specific identifiers including microscopic relaxation times diverging on a Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) trajectory, a Havriliak-Negami (HN) form for the dielectric function, and a general Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) form for time-domain relaxation. Recently, the pyrochlore Dy2Ti2O7 has become of interest because its frustrated magnetic interactions may, in theory, lead to highly exotic magnetic fluids. However, its true magnetic state at low temperatures has proven very difficult to identify unambiguously. Here we introduce high-precision, boundary-free magnetization transport techniques based upon toroidal geometries and gain a fundamentally new understanding of the time- and frequency-dependent magnetization dynamics of Dy2Ti2O7. We demonstrate a virtually universal HN form for the magnetic susceptibility, a general KWW form for the real-time magnetic relaxation, and a divergence of the microscopic magnetic relaxation rates with precisely the VTF trajectory. Low temperature Dy2Ti2O7 therefore exhibits the characteristics of a supercooled magnetic liquid; the consequent implication is that this translationally invariant lattice of strongly correlated spins is evolving towards an unprecedented magnetic glass state, perhaps due to many-body localization of spin.
  • In this article we present high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra of the heavy-fermion superconductor URu$_2$Si$_2$. Measurements as a function of both excitation energy and temperature allow us to disentangle a variety of spectral features, revealing the evolution of the low energy electronic structure across the hidden order transition. Already above the hidden order transition our measurements reveal the existence of weakly dispersive states below the Fermi level that exhibit a large scattering rate. Upon entering the hidden order phase, these states transform into a coherent heavy fermion liquid that hybridizes with the conduction bands.
  • Replacing a magnetic atom by a spinless atom in a heavy fermion compound generates a quantum state often referred to as a 'Kondo-hole'. No experimental imaging has been achieved of the atomic-scale electronic structure of a Kondo-hole, or of their destructive impact (Lawrence JM, et al. (1996) Kondo hole behavior in Ce0. 97La0. 03Pd3. Phys Rev B 53:12559-12562; Bauer ED, et al. (2011) Electronic inhomogeneity in a Kondo lattice. Proc Natl Acad Sci. 108:6857-6861) on the hybridization process between conduction and localized electrons which generates the heavy fermion state. Here we report visualization of the electronic structure at Kondo-holes created by substituting spinless Thorium atoms for magnetic Uranium atoms in the heavy-fermion system URu2Si2. At each Thorium atom, an electronic bound state is observed. Moreover, surrounding each Thorium atom we find the unusual modulations of hybridization strength recently predicted to occur at Kondo-holes (Figgins J, Morr DK (2011) Defects in heavy-fermion materials: unveiling strong correlations in real space. Phys Rev Lett 107:066401). Then, by introducing the 'hybridization gapmap' technique to heavy fermion studies, we discover intense nanoscale heterogeneity of hybridization due to a combination of the randomness of Kondo-hole sites and the long-range nature of the hybridization oscillations. These observations provide direct insight into both the microscopic processes of heavy-fermion forming hybridization and the macroscopic effects of Kondo-hole doping.
  • Within a Kondo lattice, the strong hybridization between electrons localized in real space (r-space) and those delocalized in momentum-space (k-space) generates exotic electronic states called 'heavy fermions'. In URu2Si2 these effects begin at temperatures around 55K but they are suddenly altered by an unidentified electronic phase transition at To = 17.5 K. Whether this is conventional ordering of the k-space states, or a change in the hybridization of the r-space states at each U atom, is unknown. Here we use spectroscopic imaging scanning tunnelling microscopy (SI-STM) to image the evolution of URuSi2 electronic structure simultaneously in r-space and k-space. Above To, the 'Fano lattice' electronic structure predicted for Kondo screening of a magnetic lattice is revealed. Below To, a partial energy gap without any associated density-wave signatures emerges from this Fano lattice. Heavy-quasiparticle interference imaging within this gap reveals its cause as the rapid splitting below To of a light k-space band into two new heavy fermion bands. Thus, the URu2Si2 'hidden order' state emerges directly from the Fano lattice electronic structure and exhibits characteristics, not of a conventional density wave, but of sudden alterations in both the hybridization at each U atom and the associated heavy fermion states.