• Since their discovery, submillimetre-selected galaxies (SMGs) have revolutionized the field of galaxy formation and evolution. From the hundreds of square degrees mapped at submillimetre wavelengths, only a handful of sources have been confirmed to lie at z>5 and only two at z>6. All of these SMGs are rare examples of extreme starburst galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) of >1000 M_sun/yr and therefore are not representative of the general population of dusty star-forming galaxies. Consequently, our understanding of the nature of these sources, at the earliest epochs, is still incomplete. Here we report the spectroscopic identification of a gravitationally amplified (mu = 9.3 +/- 1.0) dusty star-forming galaxy at z=6.027. After correcting for gravitational lensing, we derive an intrinsic less-extreme SFR of 380 +/- 50 M_sun/yr for this source and find that its gas and dust properties are similar to those measured for local Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), extending the local trends to a poorly explored territory in the early Universe. The star-formation efficiency of this galaxy is similar to those measured in its local analogues, despite a ~12 Gyr difference in cosmic time.
  • We present an implementation of a blind source separation algorithm to remove foregrounds off millimeter surveys made by single-channel instruments. In order to make possible such a decomposition over single-wavelength data: we generate levels of artificial redundancy, then perform a blind decomposition, calibrate the resulting maps, and lastly measure physical information. We simulate the reduction pipeline using mock data: atmospheric fluctuations, extended astrophysical foregrounds, and point-like sources, but we apply the same methodology to the AzTEC/ASTE survey of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S). In both applications, our technique robustly decomposes redundant maps into their underlying components, reducing flux bias, improving signal-to-noise, and minimizing information loss. In particular, the GOODS-S survey is decomposed into four independent physical components, one of them is the already known map of point sources, two are atmospheric and systematic foregrounds, and the fourth component is an extended emission that can be interpreted as the confusion background of faint sources.
  • We investigate gas contents of star-forming galaxies associated with protocluster 4C23.56 at z = 2.49 by using the redshifted CO(3-2) and 1.1 mm dust continuum with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The observations unveil seven CO detections out of 22 targeted H$\alpha$ emitters (HAEs) and four out of 19 in 1.1 mm dust continuum. They have high stellar mass ($M_{\star}>4\times 10^{10}$ $M_{\odot}$) and exhibit a specific star-formation rate typical of main-sequence star forming galaxies at $z\sim2.5$. Different gas mass estimators from CO(3-2) and 1.1 mm yield consistent values for simultaneous detections. The gas mass ($M_{\rm gas}$) and gas fraction ($f_{\rm gas}$) are comparable to those of field galaxies, with $M_{\rm gas}=[0.3, 1.8]\times10^{11} \times (\alpha_{\rm CO}/(4.36\times A(Z)$)) M$_{\odot}$, where $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ is the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor and $A(Z)$ the additional correction factor for the metallicity dependence of $\alpha_{\rm CO}$, and $\langle f_{\rm gas}\rangle = 0.53 \pm 0.07$ from CO(3-2). Our measurements place a constraint on the cosmic gas density of high-$z$ protoclusters, indicating the protocluster is characterized by a gas density higher than that of the general fields by an order of magnitude. We found $\rho (H_2)\sim 5 \times 10^9 \,M_{\odot}\,{\rm Mpc^{-3}}$ with the CO(3-2) detections. The five ALMA CO detections occur in the region of highest galaxy surface density, where the density positively correlates with global star-forming efficiency (SFE) and stellar mass. Such correlations imply a potentially critical role of environment on early galaxy evolution at high-z protoclusters, although future observations are necessary for confirmation.
  • We directly detect dust emission in an optically-detected, multiply-imaged galaxy lensed by the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. We detect two images of the same galaxy at 1.1mm with the AzTEC camera on the Large Millimeter Telescope leaving no ambiguity in the counterpart identification. This galaxy, MACS071_Az9, is at z>4 and the strong lensing model (mu=7.5) allows us to calculate an intrinsic IR luminosity of 9.7e10 Lsun and an obscured star formation rate of 14.6 +/- 4.5 Msun/yr. The unobscured star formation rate from the UV is only 4.1 +/- 0.3 Msun/yr which means the total star formation rate (18.7 +/- 4.5 Msun/yr) is dominated (75-80%) by the obscured component. With an intrinsic stellar mass of only 6.9e9Msun, MACS0717_Az9 is one of only a handful of z>4 galaxies at these lower masses that is detected in dust emission. This galaxy lies close to the estimated star formation sequence at this epoch. However, it does not lie on the dust obscuration relation (IRX-beta) for local starburst galaxies and is instead consistent with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) attenuation law. This remarkable lower mass galaxy showing signs of both low metallicity and high dust content may challenge our picture of dust production in the early Universe.
  • The first 1.1 mm continuum survey toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was performed using the AzTEC instrument installed on the ASTE 10-m telescope. This survey covered 4.5 deg$^2$ of the SMC with $1\sigma$ noise levels of $5-12$ mJy beam$^{-1}$, and 44 extended objects were identified. The 1.1 mm extended emission has good spatial correlation with $Herschel$ 160 $\mathrm{\mu m}$, indicating that the origin of the 1.1 mm extended emission is thermal emission from a cold dust component. We estimated physical properties using the 1.1 mm and filtered $Herschel$ data (100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 $\mathrm{\mu m}$). The 1.1 mm objects show dust temperatures of $17-45$ K and gas masses of $4\times10^3-3\times10^5~M_\odot$, assuming single-temperature thermal emission from the cold dust with an emissivity index, $\beta$, of 1.2 and a gas-to-dust ratio of 1000. These physical properties are very similar to those of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in our galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The 1.1 mm objects also displayed good spatial correlation with the $Spitzer$ 24 $\mathrm{\mu m}$ and CO emission, suggesting that the 1.1 mm objects trace the dense gas regions as sites of massive star formation. The dust temperature of the 1.1 mm objects also demonstrated good correlation with the 24 $\mathrm{\mu m}$ flux connected to massive star formation. This supports the hypothesis that the heating source of the cold dust is mainly local star-formation activity in the 1.1 mm objects. The classification of the 1.1 mm objects based on the existence of star-formation activity reveals the differences in the dust temperature, gas mass, and radius, which reflects the evolution sequence of GMCs.
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • We present the results of a closure phase analysis of 3 mm very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements performed on Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We have analyzed observations made in May 2015 using the Very Long Baseline Array, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano and obtained non-zero closure phase measurements on several station triangles - indicative of a non-point-symmetric source structure. The data are fitted with an asymmetric source structure model in Sgr A*, represented by a simple two-component model, which favours a fainter component due East of the main source. This result is discussed in light of a scattering screen with substructure or an intrinsically asymmetric source.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S_1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1-mm-deep continuum survey in the SXDF-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin^2, 1sigma = 0.055 mJy beam^-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ~ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0} Jy deg^{-2}, which corresponds to ~ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multi-wavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR ~ 1e12 L_sun or SFR ~ 100 M_sun yr^{-1}). By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (z_photo) and stellar masses (M_*): z_photo ~ 1.3-2.5, M_* ~ (3.5-9.5)e10 M_sun. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (sSFRs) as ~ 30-200 M_sun yr^{-1} and ~ 0.8-2 Gyr^{-1}, respectively. These values imply that they are main-sequence star-forming galaxies.
  • We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm) > 0.2 mJy.
  • We present first results from the SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin^2 deep survey at 1.1 mm using Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The map reaches a 1sigma depth of 55 uJy/beam and covers 12 Halpha-selected star-forming galaxies at z = 2.19 or z=2.53. We have detected continuum emission from three of our Halpha-selected sample, including one compact star-forming galaxy with high stellar surface density, NB2315-07. They are all red in the rest-frame optical and have stellar masses of log (M*/Msun)>10.9 whereas the other blue, main-sequence galaxies with log(M*/Msun)=10.0-10.8 are exceedingly faint, <290 uJy (2sigma upper limit). We also find the 1.1 mm-brightest galaxy, NB2315-02, to be associated with a compact (R_e=0.7+-0.1 kpc), dusty star-forming component. Given high gas fraction (44^{+20}_{-8}% or 37^{+25}_{-3}%) and high star formation rate surface density (126^{+27}_{-30} Msun yr^{-1}kpc^{-2}), the concentrated starburst can within less than 50^{+12}_{-11} Myr build up a stellar surface density matching that of massive compact galaxies at z~2, provided at least 19+-3% of the total gas is converted into stars in the galaxy centre. On the other hand, NB2315-07, which already has such a high stellar surface density core, shows a gas fraction (23+-8%) and is located in the lower envelope of the star formation main-sequence. This compact less star-forming galaxy is likely to be in an intermediate phase between compact dusty star-forming and quiescent galaxies.
  • We report the discovery of a new ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG) behind the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This SMG is detected as a 43.3+-8.4 mJy point source (MM J01071-7302, hereafter MMJ0107) in the 1.1 mm continuum survey of the SMC by AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. MMJ0107 is also detected in the radio (843 MHz), Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer MIPS 24 {\mu}m, all IRAC bands, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and near-infrared (J, H, KS). We find an optical (U, B, V) source, which might be the lensing object, at a distance of 1.4 arcsec from near-infrared and IRAC sources. Photometric redshift estimates for the SMG using representative spectral energy distribution templates show the redshifts of 1.4-3.9. We estimate total far-infrared luminosity of (0.3-2.2)x10^14 {\mu}^-1 L_sun and a star formation rate of 5600-39, 000 {\mu}^-1 M_sun yr^-1, where {\mu} is the gravitational magnification factor. This apparent extreme star formation activity is likely explained by a highly magnified gravitational lens system.
  • We present a large-scale study of the X-ray properties and near-IR-to-radio SEDs of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at 1.1mm with the AzTEC instrument across a ~1.2 square degree area of the sky. Combining deep 2-4 Ms Chandra data with Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and VLA data within the GOODS-N/S and COSMOS fields, we find evidence for AGN activity in ~14 percent of 271 AzTEC SMGs, ~28 percent considering only the two GOODS fields. Through X-ray spectral modeling and SED fitting using Monte Carlo Markov Chain techniques to Siebenmorgen et al. (2004) (AGN) and Efstathiou et al. (2000) (starburst) templates, we find that while star formation dominates the IR emission, with SFRs ~100-1000 M_sun/yr, the X-ray emission for most sources is almost exclusively from obscured AGNs, with column densities in excess of 10^23 cm^-2. Only for ~6 percent of our sources do we find an X-ray-derived SFR consistent with NIR-to-radio SED derived SFRs. Inclusion of the X-ray luminosities as a prior to the NIR-to-radio SED effectively sets the AGN luminosity and SFR, preventing significant contribution from the AGN template. Our SED modeling further shows that the AGN and starburst templates typically lack the required 1.1 mm emission necessary to match observations, arguing for an extended, cool dust component. The cross correlation function between the full samples of X-ray sources and SMGs in these fields does not indicate a strong correlation between the two populations at large scales, suggesting that SMGs and AGNs do not necessarily trace the same underlying large scale structure. Combined with the remaining X-ray-dim SMGs, this suggests that sub-mm bright sources may evolve along multiple tracks, with X-ray-detected SMGs representing transitionary objects between periods of high star formation and AGN activity while X-ray-faint SMGs represent a brief starburst phase of more normal galaxies.
  • One puzzle in understanding how stars form in clusters is the source of mass -- is all of the mass in place before the first stars are born, or is there an extended period when the cluster accretes material which can continuously fuel the star formation process? We use a multi-line spectral survey of the southern filament associated with the Serpens South embedded cluster-forming region in order to determine if mass is accreting from the filament onto the cluster, and whether the accretion rate is significant. Our analysis suggests that material is flowing along the filament's long axis at a rate of ~30Msol/Myr (inferred from the N2H+ velocity gradient along the filament), and radially contracting onto the filament at ~130Msol/Myr (inferred from HNC self-absorption). These accretion rates are sufficient to supply mass to the central cluster at a similar rate to the current star formation rate in the cluster. Filamentary accretion flows may therefore be very important in the ongoing evolution of this cluster.
  • We present a new submm/mm galaxy counterpart identification technique which builds on the use of Spitzer IRAC colors as discriminators between likely counterparts and the general IRAC galaxy population. Using 102 radio- and SMA-confirmed counterparts to AzTEC sources across three fields (GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS), we develop a non-parametric IRAC color-color characteristic density distribution (CDD), which, when combined with positional uncertainty information via likelihood ratios, allows us to rank all potential IRAC counterparts around SMGs and calculate the significance of each ranking via the reliability factor. We report all robust and tentative radio counterparts to SMGs, the first such list available for AzTEC/COSMOS, as well as the highest ranked IRAC counterparts for all AzTEC SMGs in these fields as determined by our technique. We demonstrate that the technique is free of radio bias and thus applicable regardless of radio detections. For observations made with a moderate beamsize (~18"), this technique identifies ~85 per cent of SMG counterparts. For much larger beamsizes (>30"), we report identification rates of 33-49 per cent. Using simulations, we demonstrate that this technique is an improvement over using positional information alone for observations with facilities such as AzTEC on the LMT and SCUBA-2 on JCMT.
  • We present results from the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1-mm imaging survey of 35 Ly-alpha blobs (LABs) found in the SSA22 protocluster at z = 3.1. These 1.1-mm data reach an r.m.s. noise level of 0.7-1 mJy/beam, making this the largest millimetre-wave survey of LABs to date. No significant (> 3.5-sigma) emission is found in any of individual 35 LABs, and from this, we estimate 3-sigma upper limits on the far-infrared luminosity of L_FIR < 2e+12 Lsun. Stacking analysis reveals that the 1.1-mm flux density averaged over the LABs is S(1.1mm) < 0.40 mJy (3-sigma), which places a constraint of L_FIR < 4.5e+11 Lsun. This indicates that earlier 850-um measurements of the LABs may have overestimated their flux densities. Our results suggest that LABs on average have little ultra-luminous obscured star-formation, in contrast to a long-believed picture that LABs undergo an intense episode of dusty star-formation activities with star-formation rates of ~ 10^3 Msun/yr. Observations with ALMA are needed to directly study the obscured part of star-formation activity in the LABs.
  • Instruments using arrays of many bolometers have become increasingly common in the past decade. The maps produced by such instruments typically include the filtering effects of the instrument as well as those from subsequent steps performed in the reduction of the data. Therefore interpretation of the maps is dependent upon accurately calculating the transfer function of the chosen reduction technique on the signal of interest. Many of these instruments use non-linear and iterative techniques to reduce their data because such methods can offer improved signal-to-noise over those that are purely linear, particularly for signals at scales comparable to that subtended by the array. We discuss a general approach for measuring the transfer function of principal component analysis (PCA) on point sources that are small compared to the spatial extent seen by any single bolometer within the array. The results are applied to previously released AzTEC catalogues of the COSMOS, Lockman Hole, Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field, GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields. Source flux density and noise estimates increase by roughly +10 per cent for fields observed while AzTEC was installed at the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment and +15-25 per cent while AzTEC was installed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Detection significance is, on average, unaffected by the revised technique. The revised photometry technique will be used in subsequent AzTEC releases.
  • We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.5<z<5.2 and a radio quiet quasar at z=6.3, obtained using the AzTEC bolometer array mounted on the ASTE or the JCMT. This paper more than doubles the number of high-z radio galaxies imaged at millimetre/sub-millimetre wavelengths. We detect probable millimetre-wave counterparts for 11 of the active galaxies. The 6 active galaxies which do not have a probable millimetre counterpart in our images nevertheless have one or more likely associated millimetric source. Thus, we conclude that powerful (radio-loud) active galaxies at high-z are beacons for finding luminous millimetre/sub-millimetre galaxies at high-z. The flux densities of our AzTEC counterparts imply star formation rates ranging from <200 to ~1300 M./yr. In addition, we find that for the radio galaxoes the 1.1 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galaxies in our sample. Combining these with archival data, we examine the mid-infrared colours of our sample. We find that radio galaxies for which we have detected a probable 1.1 mm counterpart have mid-infrared colours consistent with dusty starbursts, and are usually bluer than high-z Spitzer-selected active galaxies. In addition, we find arcs of 24 micron sources extending across ~200-500 kpc, apparently associated with three of the radio galaxies.
  • We measure the angular two-point correlation function of sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 1.1-millimeter imaging of the COSMOS field with the AzTEC camera and ASTE 10-meter telescope. These data yields one of the largest contiguous samples of SMGs to date, covering an area of 0.72 degrees^2 down to a 1.26 mJy/beam (1-sigma) limit, including 189 (328) sources with S/N greater than 3.5 (3). We can only set upper limits to the correlation length r_0, modeling the correlation function as a power-law with pre-assigned slope. Assuming existing redshift distributions, we derive 68.3% confidence level upper limits of r_0 < 6-8 h^-1 Mpc at 3.7 mJy, and r_0 < 11-12 h^-1 Mpc at 4.2 mJy. Although consistent with most previous estimates, these upper limits imply that the real r_0 is likely smaller. This casts doubts on the robustness of claims that SMGs are characterized by significantly stronger spatial clustering, (and thus larger mass), than differently selected galaxies at high-redshift. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that even strongly clustered distributions of galaxies can appear unclustered when sampled with limited sensitivity and coarse angular resolution common to current sub-millimeter surveys. The simulations, however, also show that unclustered distributions can appear strongly clustered under these circumstances. From the simulations, we predict that at our survey depth, a mapped area of two degrees^2 is needed to reconstruct the correlation function, assuming smaller beam sizes of future surveys (e.g. the Large Millimeter Telescope's 6" beam size). At present, robust measures of the clustering strength of bright SMGs appear to be below the reach of most observations.
  • Massive clusters of galaxies have been found as early as 3.9 Billion years (z=1.62) after the Big Bang containing stars that formed at even earlier epochs. Cosmological simulations using the current cold dark matter paradigm predict these systems should descend from "proto-clusters" - early over-densities of massive galaxies that merge hierarchically to form a cluster. These proto-cluster regions themselves are built-up hierarchically and so are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies which can be observed as luminous quasars and starbursts. However, observational evidence for this scenario is sparse due to the fact that high-redshift proto-clusters are rare and difficult to observe. Here we report a proto-cluster region 1 billion years (z=5.3) after the Big Bang. This cluster of massive galaxies extends over >13 Mega-parsecs, contains a luminous quasar as well as a system rich in molecular gas. These massive galaxies place a lower limit of >4x10^11 solar masses of dark and luminous matter in this region consistent with that expected from cosmological simulations for the earliest galaxy clusters.
  • We combine new ASTE/AzTEC 1.1 mm maps of the galaxy pair NGC 1512/1510 with archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images covering the wavelength range 3.6--160 um from the SINGS project to derive accurate dust masses in each galaxy, and in sub--galactic regions in NGC 1512. The two galaxies form a pair consisting of a large, high--metallicity spiral (NGC 1512) and a low metallicity, blue compact dwarf (NGC 1510). The derived total dust masses are (2.4+/-0.6) 10^7 Msun and (1.7+/-3.6) 10^5 Msun for NGC 1512 and NGC 1510, respectively. The derived ratio of dust mass to H I gas mass for the galaxy pair (0.0034) is much lower than expected, while regions within NGC 1512, specifically the central region and the arms, do not show such unusually low ratios; furthermore, the dust--to--gas ratio is within expectations for NGC 1510. These results suggest that a fraction of the H I included in the determination of the M_d/M_HI ratio of the NGC 1512/1510 pair is not associated with the star forming disks/regions of either galaxy. We also perform simple two--temperature (warm + cold) modified--blackbody fits to the far--infrared/mm data. The warm dust temperature of the low--metallicity NGC 1510 (~36 K) is substantially higher than that of the high--metallicity NGC 1512 (~24 K). In both galaxies, a substantial fraction (>93%) of the total dust mass is in a cool dust component, with temperatures 14--16 K for NGC 1512 and 15--24 K for NGC 1510. In contrast, the warm dust in the arms and central regions of NGC 1512 represents a much larger fraction of the total dust content, in agreement with the fact that all three regions have higher specific star formation rates than the average in the galaxy.
  • We present high resolution submillimeter interferometric imaging of two of the brightest high-redshift submillimeter galaxies known: GN20 and AzTEC1 at 0.8 and 0.3 arcsec resolution respectively. Our data - the highest resolution submillimeter imaging of high redshift sources accomplished to date - was collected in three different array configurations: compact, extended, and very extended. We derive angular sizes of 0.6 and 1.0 arcsec for GN20 and 0.3 and 0.4 arcsec for AzTEC1 from modeling their visibility functions as a Gaussian and elliptical disk respectively. Because both sources are B-band dropouts, they likely lie within a relatively narrow redshift window around z~4, which indicates their angular extent corresponds to physical scales of 4-8 and 1.5-3 kpc respectively for the starburst region. By way of a series of simple assumptions, we find preliminary evidence that these hyperluminous starbursts - with star formation rates >1000 $M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ - are radiating at or close to their Eddington limit. Should future high resolution observations indicate that these two objects are typical of a population of high redshift Eddington-limited starbursts, this could have important consequences for models of star formation and feedback in extreme environments.
  • We have used the Submillimeter Array to image a flux limited sample of seven submillimeter galaxies, selected by the AzTEC camera on the JCMT at 1.1 mm, in the COSMOS field at 890um with 2" resolution. All of the sources - two radio-bright and five radio-dim - are detected as single point-sources at high significance (> 6\sigma), with positions accurate to 0.2" that enable counterpart identification at other wavelengths observed with similarly high angular resolution. All seven have IRAC counterparts, but only two have secure counterparts in deep HST/ACS imaging. As compared to the two radio-bright sources in the sample, and those in previous studies, the five radio-dim sources in the sample (1) have systematically higher submillimeter-to-radio flux ratios, (2) have lower IRAC 3.6-8.0um fluxes, and (3) are not detected at 24um. These properties, combined with size constraints at 890um (\theta < 1.2"), suggest that the radio-dim submillimeter galaxies represent a population of very dusty starbursts, with physical scales similar to local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and an average redshift higher than radio-bright sources.