• The electronic ground state in many iridate materials is described by a complex wave-function in which spin and orbital angular momenta are entangled due to relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Such a localized electronic state carries an effective total angular momentum of $J_{eff}=1/2$. In materials with an edge-sharing octahedral crystal structure, such as the honeycomb iridates Li2IrO3 and Na2IrO3, these $J_{eff}=1/2$ moments are expected to be coupled through a special bond-dependent magnetic interaction, which is a necessary condition for the realization of a Kitaev quantum spin liquid. However, this relativistic electron picture is challenged by an alternate description, in which itinerant electrons are confined to a benzene-like hexagon, keeping the system insulating despite the delocalized nature of the electrons. In this quasi-molecular orbital (QMO) picture, the honeycomb iridates are an unlikely choice for a Kitaev spin liquid. Here we show that the honeycomb iridate Li2IrO3 is best described by a $J_{eff}=1/2$ state at ambient pressure, but crosses over into a QMO state under the application of small (~ 0.1 GPa) hydrostatic pressure. This result illustrates that the physics of iridates is extremely rich due to a delicate balance between electronic bandwidth, spin-orbit coupling, crystal field, and electron correlation.
  • Structural, magnetic and electrical-transport properties of {\alpha}-LiFeO2, crystallizing in the rock salt structure with random distribution of Li and Fe ions, have been studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, 57Fe M\"ossbauer spectroscopy and electrical resistance measurements at pressures up to 100 GPa using diamond anvil cells. It was found that the crystal structure is stable at least to 82 GPa, though a significant change in compressibility has been observed above 50 GPa. The changes in the structural properties are found to be on a par with a sluggish Fe3+ high- to low-spin (HS-LS) transition (S=5/2 to S=1/2) starting at 50 GPa and not completed even at ~100 GPa. The HS-LS transition is accompanied by an appreciable resistance decrease remaining a semiconductor up to 115 GPa and is not expected to be metallic even at about 200 GPa. The observed feature of the pressure-induced HS-LS transition is not an ordinary behavior of ferric oxides at high pressures. The effect of Fe3+ nearest and next nearest neighbors on the features of the spin crossover is discussed.
  • We show that polycrystalline GeSb2Te4 in the fcc phase (f-GST), which is an insulator at low temperature at ambient pressure, becomes a superconductor at elevated pressures. Our study of the superconductor to insulator transition versus pressure at low temperatures reveals a second order quantum phase transition with linear scaling (critical exponent close to unity) of the transition temperature with the pressure above the critical zero-temperature pressure. In addition, we demonstrate that at higher pressures the f-GST goes through a structural phase transition via amorphization to bcc GST (b-GST), which also become superconducting. We also find that the pressure regime where an inhomogeneous mixture of amorphous and b-GST exists, there is an anomalous peak in magnetoresistance, and suggest an explanation for this anomaly.