• We present a high-resolution, near-IR spectroscopic study of multiple outflows in the LkH$\alpha$ 234 star formation region using the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS). Spectral mapping over the blueshifted emission of HH 167 allowed us to distinguish at least three separate, spatially overlapped, outflows in H${_2}$ and [Fe II] emission. We show that the H${_2}$ emission represents not a single jet, but complex multiple outflows driven by three known embedded sources: MM1, VLA 2, and VLA 3. There is a redshifted H${_2}$ outflow at a low velocity, $\VLSR$ $<$ $+$50 {\kms}, with respect to the systemic velocity of $\VLSR$ $=$ $-$11.5 {\kms}, that coincides with the H${_2}$O masers seen in earlier radio observations two arcseconds southwest of VLA 2. We found that the previously detected [Fe II] jet with $|$$\VLSR$$|$ $>$ 100 {\kms} driven by VLA 3B is also detected in H${_2}$ emission, and confirm that this jet has a position angle about 240$\degree$. Spectra of the redshifted knots at 14$\arcsec$$-$65$\arcsec$ northeast of LkH$\alpha$ 234 are presented for the first time. These spectra also provide clues to the existence of multiple outflows. We detected high-velocity (50$-$120 {\kms}) H${_2}$ gas in the multiple outflows around LkH$\alpha$ 234. Since these gases move at speeds well over the dissociation velocity ($>$ 40 {\kms}), the emission must originate from the jet itself rather than H${_2}$ gas in the ambient medium. Also, position-velocity diagrams and excitation diagram indicate that emission from knot C in HH 167 come from two different phenomena, shocks and photodissociation.
  • ROXs 12 (2MASS J16262803-2526477) is a young star hosting a directly imaged companion near the deuterium-burning limit. We present a suite of spectroscopic, imaging, and time-series observations to characterize the physical and environmental properties of this system. Moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of ROXs 12 B from Gemini-North/NIFS and Keck/OSIRIS reveals signatures of low surface gravity including weak alkali absorption lines and a triangular $H$-band pseudo-continuum shape. No signs of Pa$\beta$ emission are evident. As a population, however, we find that about half (46 $\pm$ 14\%) of young ($\lesssim$15 Myr) companions with masses $\lesssim$20 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ possess actively accreting subdisks detected via Pa$\beta$ line emission, which represents a lower limit on the prevalence of circumplanetary disks in general as some are expected to be in a quiescent phase of accretion. The bolometric luminosity of the companion and age of the host star (6$^{+4}_{-2}$ Myr) imply a mass of 17.5 $\pm$ 1.5 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ for ROXs 12 B based on hot-start evolutionary models. We identify a wide (5100 AU) tertiary companion to this system, 2MASS J16262774-2527247, which is heavily accreting and exhibits stochastic variability in its $K2$ light curve. By combining $v$sin$i_*$ measurements with rotation periods from $K2$, we constrain the line-of-sight inclinations of ROXs 12 A and 2MASS J16262774-2527247 and find that they are misaligned by 60$^{+7}_{-11}$$^{\circ}$. In addition, the orbital axis of ROXs 12 B is likely misaligned from the spin axis of its host star ROXs 12 A, suggesting that ROXs 12 B formed akin to fragmenting binary stars or in an equatorial disk that was torqued by the wide stellar tertiary.
  • We present analysis of near-infrared, high-resolution spectroscopy towards the Flat-spectrum YSO (Young Stellar Object) ESO H$\alpha$ 279a (1.5 solar mass) in the Serpens star forming region, at the distance of 429 pc. Using the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, R=45,000), we detect emission lines originating from the accretion channel flow, jet, and inner disk. Specifically, we identify hydrogen Brackett series recombination, [Fe II], [Fe III], [Fe IV], Ca I, Na I, H2, H2O and CO overtone emission lines. By modeling five bands of CO overtone emission lines, and the symmetric double-peaked line profile for Na I emission lines, we find that ESO H$\alpha$ 279a has an actively accreting Keplerian disk. From our Keplerian disk model, we find that Na I emission lines originate between 0.04 AU and 1.00 AU, while CO overtone emission lines are from the outer part of disk, in the range between 0.22 AU and 3.00 AU. It reveals that the neutral atomic Na gas is a good tracer of the innermost region of the actively accreting disk. We derive a mass accretion rate of 2-10x10^{-7} M_solar/yr from the measured Br_gamma emission luminosity of 1.78(+-0.31)x10^{31} erg/s.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely red planetary-mass companion to 2MASS J22362452+4751425, a $\approx$0.6 $M_{\odot}$ late-K dwarf likely belonging to the $\sim$120 Myr AB Doradus moving group. 2M2236+4751 b was identified in multi-epoch NIRC2 adaptive optics imaging at Keck Observatory at a separation of 3.7$"$, or 230 $\pm$ 20 AU in projection at the kinematic distance of 63 $\pm$ 5 pc to its host star. Assuming membership in the AB Dor group, as suggested from its kinematics, the inferred mass of 2M2236+4751 b is 11-14 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$. Follow-up Keck/OSIRIS $K$-band spectroscopy of the companion reveals strong CO absorption similar to other faint red L dwarfs and lacks signs of methane absorption despite having an effective temperature of $\approx$900-1200 K. With a ($J$-$K$)$_\mathrm{MKO}$ color of 2.69 $\pm$ 0.12 mag, the near-infrared slope of 2M2236+4751 b is redder than all of the HR 8799 planets and instead resembles the $\approx$23 Myr isolated planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22, implying that similarly thick photospheric clouds can persist in the atmospheres of giant planets at ages beyond 100 Myr. In near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams, 2M2236+4751 b is located at the tip of the red L dwarf sequence and appears to define the "elbow" of the AB Dor substellar isochrone separating low-gravity L dwarfs from the cooler young T dwarf track. 2M2236+4751 b is the reddest substellar companion to a star and will be a valuable benchmark to study the shared atmospheric properties of young low-mass brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.
  • We report a study of the three-dimensional (3D) outflow structure of a 15$\arcsec$ $\times$ 13$\arcsec$ area around H$_{2}$ peak 1 in Orion KL with slit-scan observations (13 slits) using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. The datacubes, with high velocity-resolution ($\sim$ 7.5 {\kms}) provide high contrast imaging within ultra-narrow bands, and enable the detection of the main stream of the previously reported H$_{2}$ outflow fingers. We identified 31 distinct fingers in H$_{2}$ 1$-$0 S(1) $\lambda$2.122 $\micron$ emission. The line profile at each finger shows multiple-velocity peaks with a strong low-velocity component around the systemic velocity at ${\VLSR}$ = $+$8 {\kms} and high velocity emission ($|$${\VLSR}$$|$ = 45$-$135 {\kms}) indicating a typical bow-shock. The observed radial velocity gradients of $\sim$ 4 {\kms} arcsec$^{-1}$ agree well with the velocities inferred from large-scale proper motions, where the projected motion is proportional to distance from a common origin. We construct a conceptual 3D map of the fingers with the estimated inclination angles of 57$\degree$$-$74$\degree$. The extinction difference ($\Delta$$A_{\rm v}$ $>$ 10 mag) between blueshifted and redshifted fingers indicates high internal extinction. The extinction, the overall angular spread and scale of the flow argue for an ambient medium with very high density (10$^{5}$$-$10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$), consistent with molecular line observations of the OMC core. The radial velocity gradients and the 3D distributions of the fingers together support the hypothesis of simultaneous, radial explosion of the Orion KL outflow.
  • We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star Lk{\Ha} 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). Previous studies indicate that the region around Lk{\Ha} 234 is complex, with several embedded YSOs and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H$-$ and K$-$band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 {\FeII} and 14 H$_{2}$ emission lines. We revealed a new {\FeII} jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of H$_{2}$ 1$-$0 S(1) $\lambda$2.122 $\micron$ line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H$_{2}$ emission at the systemic velocity (V$_{LSR}$ $=$ $-$10.2 {\kms}) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity, {\FeII} emission lines are detected at farther from the systemic velocity, at V$_{LSR}$ $=$ $-$100 $-$ $-$130 {\kms}. We infer that the H$_{2}$ emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H$_{2}$ lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2,500 $-$ 3,000 K and the emission results from shock excitation.
  • We study the Lya profiles of 36 spectroscopically-detected Lya-emitters (LAEs) at z2-3, using Keck MOSFIRE to measure systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The sample has a median optical magnitude R=26.0, and ranges from R23 to R>27, corresponding to rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M_UV-22 to M_UV>-18.2. Dynamical masses range from M_dyn<1.3e8 Msun to M_dyn=6.8e9 Msun, with a median value of M_dyn=6.3e8 Msun. Thirty of the 36 Lya emission lines are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity with at least 1 sigma significance, and the velocity offset with respect to systemic dv_Lya is correlated with R-band magnitude, M_UV, and the velocity dispersion measured from nebular emission lines with >3 sigma significance: brighter galaxies with larger velocity dispersions tend to have larger values of dv_Lya. We also make use of a comparison sample of 122 UV-color-selected R<25.5 galaxies at z2, all with Lya emission and systemic redshifts measured from nebular emission lines. Using the combined LAE and comparison samples for a total of 158 individual galaxies, we find that dv_Lya is anti-correlated with the Lya equivalent width with 7 sigma significance. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which the Lya profile is determined primarily by the properties of the gas near the systemic redshift; in such a scenario, the opacity to Lya photons in lower mass galaxies may be reduced if large gaseous disks have not yet developed and if the gas is ionized by the harder spectrum of young, low metallicity stars.
  • Multi-epoch photometry from AllWISE provides the opportunity to investigate variability at 3.4 and 4.6 microns for most known brown dwarfs. WISE observed the same patch of sky repeatedly and within a day's time, roughly 12 observations were obtained on a given patch of sky; then, another 12 were obtained roughly six months later when that patch of sky was again in view. For most of the sky, AllWISE contains two separate epochs of about a dozen observations each, although ~30% of the sky has three such epochs available in AllWISE. With the AllWISE multi-epoch photometry of ~1500 known M, L, T, and Y dwarfs, I computed the Stetson J Index and quantified variability as a function of spectral type. I found that the average single-exposure photometric uncertainty in AllWISE (~0.2 magnitudes) is too large to robustly identify flux variability smaller than ~20%. However, multi-epoch photometry from AllWISE remains a useful resource in cases where flux variability is known to be present with large amplitudes, or for bright nearby objects with lower photometric uncertainties.
  • We present Keck II laser guide star adaptive optics observations of the brown dwarf WISEP J061135.13-041024.0 showing it is a binary with a component separation of 0.4". This system is one of the six known resolved binaries in which the magnitude differences between the components show a reversal in sign between the Y/J band and the H/K bands. Deconvolution of the composite spectrum results in a best fit binary solution with L9 and T1.5 components. We also present a preliminary parallax placing the system at a distance of 21.2+/-1.3 pc. Using the distance and resolved magnitudes we are able to place WISEP J061135.13-041024.0AB on a color-absolute magnitude diagram, showing that this system contributes to the well-known "J-band bump" and the components' properties appear similar to other late-type L and early-type T dwarfs. Fitting our data to a set of cloudy atmosphere models suggests the system has an age >1 Gyr with WISEP J061135.13-041024.0A having an effective temperature (Teff) of 1275-1325 K and mass of 64-65 M_Jup, and WISEP J061135.13-041024.0B having Teff = 1075-1115 K and mass 40-65 M_Jup.
  • While quality checking a new motion-aware co-addition of all 12.5 months of WISE data, the source WISE J070720.48+170533.0 was found to have moved 0.9 arc-sec in 6 months. Backtracking this motion allowed us to identify this source as 2MASS J07071961+1705464 and with several entries in the USNO B catalog. An astrometric fit to these archival data gives a proper motion of 1793 +/- 2 mas/yr and a parallax of 35 +/- 42 mas. Photometry from WISE, 2MASS and the POSS can be fit reasonably well by a blackbody with T = 3658 K and an angular radius of 4.36E-11 radians. No clear evidence of H_2 collision-induced absorption is seen in the near-IR. An optical spectrum shows broad deep CaH bands at 638 and 690 nm, broad deep Na D at 598.2 nm, and weak or absent TiO, indicating that this source is an ultra-subdwarf M star with a radial velocity about -21 +/- 18 km/sec relative to the Sun. Given its apparent magnitude, the distance is about 39 +/- 9 pc and the tangential velocity is probably about 330 km/sec, but a more precise parallax is needed to be certain.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has revealed a T8.5 brown dwarf (WISE J111838.70+312537.9) that exhibits common proper motion with a solar-neighborhood (8 pc) quadruple star system - Xi Ursae Majoris. The angular separation is 8.5 arc-min, and the projected physical separation is about 4000 AU. The sub-solar metallicity and low chromospheric activity of Xi UMa A argue that the system has an age of at least 2 Gyr. The infrared luminosity and color of the brown dwarf suggests the mass of this companion ranges between 14 and 38 Jupiter masses for system ages of 2 and 8 Gyr respectively.
  • We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the WISE all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12); Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify 7 fainter (4.5 $\mu$m $\sim$ 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy (HyLIRG) candidates. For this control sample we find another 6 brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the 7 companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these 7 Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this there is no evidence for any widely separated ($>$ 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of $\sim$ 7.33 $\times 10^5$ objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m photometry, along with positionally matched $B$ and $R$ photometry from USNO-B; $J$, $H$, and $K_s$ photometry from 2MASS; and $W1$, $W2$, $W3$, and $W4$ photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.