• Differentiating between active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity and star formation in z ~ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line ratio diagnostics, change with redshift while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGN. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines in HST/WFC3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O III]/H$\beta$ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ~ sim 40% more low-mass and obscured AGN than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O III]/H$\beta$ gradient to AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ~2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. Using this gradient method will also be able to inform other galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved JWST data.
  • We present a Bayesian approach to the redshift classification of emission-line galaxies when only a single emission line is detected spectroscopically. We consider the case of surveys for high-redshift Lyman-alpha-emitting galaxies (LAEs), which have traditionally been classified via an inferred rest-frame equivalent width (EW) greater than 20 angstrom. Our Bayesian method relies on known prior probabilities in measured emission-line luminosity functions and equivalent width distributions for the galaxy populations, and returns the probability that an object in question is an LAE given the characteristics observed. This approach will be directly relevant for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), which seeks to classify ~10^6 emission-line galaxies into LAEs and low-redshift [O II] emitters. For a simulated HETDEX catalog with realistic measurement noise, our Bayesian method recovers 86% of LAEs missed by the traditional EW > 20 angstrom cutoff over 2 < z < 3, outperforming the EW cut in both contamination and incompleteness. This is due to the method's ability to trade off between the two types of binary classification error by adjusting the stringency of the probability requirement for classifying an observed object as an LAE. In our simulations of HETDEX, this method reduces the uncertainty in cosmological distance measurements by 14% with respect to the EW cut, equivalent to recovering 29% more cosmological information. Rather than using binary object labels, this method enables the use of classification probabilities in large-scale structure analyses. It can be applied to narrowband emission-line surveys as well as upcoming large spectroscopic surveys including Euclid and WFIRST.
  • We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at $z=1.75$, which is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at $2\sigma$ significance. Fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass $M_{200,\mathrm{crit}}=2.3^{+2.1}_{-1.4}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. This mass is consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ-weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.
  • We present a deep (100 ks) Chandra observation of IDCS J1426.5+3508, a spectroscopically confirmed, infrared-selected galaxy cluster at $z = 1.75$. This cluster is the most massive galaxy cluster currently known at $z > 1.5$, based on existing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and gravitational lensing detections. We confirm this high mass via a variety of X-ray scaling relations, including $T_X$-M, $f_g$-M, $Y_X$-M and $L_X$-M, finding a tight distribution of masses from these different methods, spanning M$_{500}$ = 2.3-3.3 $\times 10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$, with the low-scatter $Y_X$-based mass $M_{500,Y_X} = 2.6^{+1.5}_{-0.5} \times 10^{14}$ M$_\odot$. IDCS J1426.5+3508 is currently the only cluster at $z > 1.5$ for which X-ray, SZ and gravitational lensing mass estimates exist, and these are in remarkably good agreement. We find a relatively tight distribution of the gas-to-total mass ratio, employing total masses from all of the aforementioned indicators, with values ranging from $f_{gas,500}$ = 0.087-0.12. We do not detect metals in the intracluster medium (ICM) of this system, placing a 2$\sigma$ upper limit of $Z(r < R_{500}) < 0.18 Z_{\odot}$. This upper limit on the metallicity suggests that this system may still be in the process of enriching its ICM. The cluster has a dense, low-entropy core, offset by $\sim$30 kpc from the X-ray centroid, which makes it one of the few "cool core" clusters discovered at $z > 1$, and the first known cool core cluster at $z > 1.2$. The offset of this core from the large-scale centroid suggests that this cluster has had a relatively recent ($\lesssim$500 Myr) merger/interaction with another massive system.
  • We compare the physical and morphological properties of z ~ 2 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) identified in the HETDEX Pilot Survey and narrow band studies with those of z ~ 2 optical emission line galaxies (oELGs) identified via HST WFC3 infrared grism spectroscopy. Both sets of galaxies extend over the same range in stellar mass (7.5 < logM < 10.5), size (0.5 < R < 3.0 kpc), and star-formation rate (~1 < SFR < 100). Remarkably, a comparison of the most commonly used physical and morphological parameters -- stellar mass, half-light radius, UV slope, star formation rate, ellipticity, nearest neighbor distance, star formation surface density, specific star formation rate, [O III] luminosity, and [O III] equivalent width -- reveals no statistically significant differences between the populations. This suggests that the processes and conditions which regulate the escape of Ly-alpha from a z ~ 2 star-forming galaxy do not depend on these quantities. In particular, the lack of dependence on the UV slope suggests that Ly-alpha emission is not being significantly modulated by diffuse dust in the interstellar medium. We develop a simple model of Ly-alpha emission that connects LAEs to all high-redshift star forming galaxies where the escape of Ly-alpha depends on the sightline through the galaxy. Using this model, we find that mean solid angle for Ly-alpha escape is 2.4+/-0.8 steradians; this value is consistent with those calculated from other studies.
  • We explore the evolution of the Stellar Mass-Star Formation Rate-Metallicity Relation using a set of 256 COSMOS and GOODS galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We present the galaxies' rest-frame optical emission-line fluxes derived from IR-grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope and combine these data with star formation rates and stellar masses obtained from deep, multi-wavelength (rest-frame UV to IR) photometry. We then compare these measurements to those for a local sample of galaxies carefully matched in stellar mass (7.5 < log(M*/Msol) < 10.5) and star formation rate (-0.5 < log(SFR) < 2.5 in Msol yr^-1). We find that the distribution of z ~ 2.1 galaxies in stellar mass-SFR-metallicity space is clearly different from that derived for our sample of similarly bright (L_H\b{eta} > 3 . 10^40 ergs s^-1) local galaxies, and this offset cannot be explained by simple systematic offsets in the derived quantities. At stellar masses above ~10^9 Msol and star formation rates above ~10 Msol yr^-1, the z ~ 2.1 galaxies have higher oxygen abundances than their local counterparts, while the opposite is true for lower-mass, lower-SFR systems.
  • We derive the mean wavelength dependence of stellar attenuation in a sample of 239 high redshift (1.90 < z < 2.35) galaxies selected via Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 IR grism observations of their rest-frame optical emission lines. Our analysis indicates that the average reddening law follows a form similar to that derived by Calzetti et al. for local starburst galaxies. However, over the mass range 7.2 < log M/Msolar < 10.2, the slope of the attenuation law in the UV is shallower than that seen locally, and the UV slope steepens as the mass increases. These trends are in qualitative agreement with Kriek & Conroy, who found that the wavelength dependence of attenuation varies with galaxy spectral type. However, we find no evidence of an extinction "bump" at 2175 A in any of the three stellar mass bins, or in the sample as a whole. We quantify the relation between the attenuation curve and stellar mass and discuss its implications.
  • We present confirmation of the cluster MOO J1142+1527, a massive galaxy cluster discovered as part of the Massive and Distant Clusters of WISE Survey. The cluster is confirmed to lie at $z=1.19$, and using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy we robustly detect the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement at 13.2$\sigma$. The SZ data imply a mass of $\mathrm{M}_{200m}=(1.1\pm0.2)\times10^{15}$ $\mathrm{M}_\odot$, making MOO J1142+1527 the most massive galaxy cluster known at $z>1.15$ and the second most massive cluster known at $z>1$. For a standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmology it is further expected to be one of the $\sim 5$ most massive clusters expected to exist at $z\ge1.19$ over the entire sky. Our ongoing Spitzer program targeting $\sim1750$ additional candidate clusters will identify comparably rich galaxy clusters over the full extragalactic sky.
  • Galaxy proto-clusters at z >~ 2 provide a direct probe of the rapid mass assembly and galaxy growth of present day massive clusters. Because of the need of precise galaxy redshifts for density mapping and the prevalence of star formation before quenching, nearly all the proto-clusters known to date were confirmed by spectroscopy of galaxies with strong emission lines. Therefore, large emission-line galaxy surveys provide an efficient way to identify proto-clusters directly. Here we report the discovery of a large-scale structure at z = 2.44 in the HETDEX Pilot Survey. On a scale of a few tens of Mpc comoving, this structure shows a complex overdensity of Lya emitters (LAE), which coincides with broad-band selected galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA photometric and zCOSMOS spectroscopic catalogs, as well as overdensities of intergalactic gas revealed in the Lya absorption maps of Lee et al. (2014). We construct mock LAE catalogs to predict the cosmic evolution of this structure. We find that such an overdensity should have already broken away from the Hubble flow, and part of the structure will collapse to form a galaxy cluster with 10^14.5 +- 0.4 M_sun by z = 0. The structure contains a higher median stellar mass of broad-band selected galaxies, a boost of extended Lya nebulae, and a marginal excess of active galactic nuclei relative to the field, supporting a scenario of accelerated galaxy evolution in cluster progenitors. Based on the correlation between galaxy overdensity and the z = 0 descendant halo mass calibrated in the simulation, we predict that several hundred 1.9 < z < 3.5 proto-clusters with z = 0 mass of > 10^14.5 M_sun will be discovered in the 8.5 Gpc^3 of space surveyed by the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment.
  • We measure the star formation rates (SFRs) of massive ($M_{\star}>10^{10.1}M_{\odot}$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) in a sample of 11 high-redshift ($1.0 < z < 1.5$) galaxy clusters drawn from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We identify ETGs visually from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and select likely cluster members as having either an appropriate spectroscopic redshift or red sequence color. Mid-infrared SFRs are measured using Spitzer 24 $\mu$m data for isolated cluster galaxies for which contamination by neighbors, and active galactic nuclei, can be ruled out. Cluster ETGs show enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs) compared to cluster galaxies in the local Universe, but have sSFRs more than four times lower than that of field ETGs at $1 < z < 1.5$. Relative to the late-type cluster population, isolated ETGs show substantially quenched mean SFRs, yet still contribute 12% of the overall star formation activity measured in $1 < z < 1.5$ clusters. We find that new ETGs are likely being formed in ISCS clusters; the fraction of cluster galaxies identified as ETGs increases from 34% to 56% from $z \sim 1.5 \rightarrow 1.25$. While the fraction of cluster ETGs that are highly star-forming ($\textrm{SFR}\geq26\ M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) drops from 27% to 10% over the same period, their sSFRs are roughly constant. All these factors taken together suggest that, particularly at $z\gtrsim1.25$, the events that created these distant cluster ETGs$-$likely mergers, at least among the most massive$-$were both recent and gas-rich.
  • We present the results from a VLT/SINFONI and Keck/NIRSPEC near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 16 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $z$ = 2.1 - 2.5 in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields discovered from the HETDEX Pilot Survey. We detect rest-frame optical nebular lines (H$\alpha$ and/or [OIII]$\lambda$5007) for 10 of the LAEs and measure physical properties, including the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity, gas-mass fraction, and Ly$\alpha$ velocity offset. We find that LAEs may lie below the mass-metallicity relation for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. The LAEs all show velocity shifts of Ly$\alpha$ relative to the systemic redshift ranging between +85 and +296 km s$^{-1}$ with a mean of +180 km s$^{-1}$. This value is smaller than measured for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The Ly$\alpha$ velocity offsets show a moderate correlation with the measured star formation rate (2.5$\sigma$), but no significant correlations are seen with the SFR surface density, specific SFR, stellar mass, or dynamical mass ($\lesssim$ 1.5$\sigma$). Exploring the role of dust, kinematics of the interstellar medium (ISM), and geometry on the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons, we find no signature of selective quenching of resonantly scattered Ly$\alpha$ photons. However, we also find no evidence that a clumpy ISM is enhancing the Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width. Our results suggest that the low metallicity in LAEs may be responsible for yielding an environment with a low neutral hydrogen column density as well as less dust, easing the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons over that in continuum-selected star-forming galaxies.
  • We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the H-beta line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the H-beta star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ~1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and star formation rate. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as H-beta is more greatly enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the star formation rate history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z ~ 2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.
  • We use broadband photometry extending from the rest-frame UV to the near-IR to fit the individual spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 63 bright (L(Ly-alpha) > 10^43 ergs/s) Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 < z < 3.6. We find that these LAEs are quite heterogeneous, with stellar masses that span over three orders of magnitude, from 7.5 < log M < 10.5. Moreover, although most LAEs have small amounts of extinction, some high-mass objects have stellar reddenings as large as E(B-V) ~0.4. Interestingly, in dusty objects the optical depths for Ly-alpha and the UV continuum are always similar, indicating that Ly-alpha photons are not undergoing many scatters before escaping their galaxy. In contrast, the ratio of optical depths in low-reddening systems can vary widely, illustrating the diverse nature of the systems. Finally, we show that in the star formation rate (SFR)-log mass diagram, our LAEs fall above the "main-sequence" defined by z ~ 3 continuum selected star-forming galaxies. In this respect, they are similar to sub-mm-selected galaxies, although most LAEs have much lower mass.
  • We compare the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies to the field from z=0.3-1.5 using $Herschel$ SPIRE 250$\mu$m imaging. We utilize 274 clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) selected as rest-frame near-infrared overdensities over the 9 square degree Bootes field . This analysis allows us to quantify the evolution of SF in clusters over a long redshift baseline without bias against active cluster systems. Using a stacking analysis, we determine the average star formation rates (SFRs) and specific-SFRs (SSFR=SFR/M$_{\star}$) of stellar mass-limited (M>1.3x10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$), statistical samples of cluster and field galaxies, probing both the star forming and quiescent populations. We find a clear indication that the average SF in cluster galaxies is evolving more rapidly than in the field, with field SF levels at z>1.2 in the cluster cores (r<0.5 Mpc), in good agreement with previous ISCS studies. By quantifying the SF in cluster and field galaxies as an exponential function of cosmic time, we determine that cluster galaxies are evolving ~2 times faster than the field. Additionally, we see enhanced SF above the field level at z~1.4 in the cluster outskirts (r>0.5 Mpc). These general trends in the cluster cores and outskirts are driven by the lower mass galaxies in our sample. Blue cluster galaxies have systematically lower SSFRs than blue field galaxies, but otherwise show no strong differential evolution with respect to the field over our redshift range. This suggests that the cluster environment is both suppressing the star formation in blue galaxies on long time-scales and rapidly transitioning some fraction of blue galaxies to the quiescent galaxy population on short time-scales. We argue that our results are consistent with both strangulation and ram pressure stripping acting in these clusters, with merger activity occurring in the cluster outskirts.
  • We present new results on the spectrally resolved Lyman-alpha (LyA) emission of three LyA emitting field galaxies at z~2.4 with high LyA equivalent width (>100 Angstroms) and LyA luminosity (~10^43 erg/s). At 120 km/s (FWHM) spectral resolution, the prominent double-peaked LyA profile straddles the systemic velocity, where the velocity zero-point is determined from spectroscopy of the galaxies' rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The average velocity offset from systemic of the stronger redshifted emission component for our sample is 176 km/s while the average total separation between the redshifted and main blueshifted emission components is 380 km/s. These measurements are a factor of ~2 smaller than for UV continuum-selected galaxies that show LyA in emission with lower LyA equivalent width. We compare our LyA spectra to the predicted line profiles of a spherical "expanding shell" LyA radiative transfer grid that models large-scale galaxy outflows. Specifically blueward of the systemic velocity where two galaxies show a weak, highly blueshifted (by ~1000 km/s) tertiary emission peak, the model line profiles are a relatively poor representation of the observed spectra. Since the neutral gas column density has a dominant influence over the shape of the LyA line profile, we caution against equating the observed LyA velocity offset with a physical outflow velocity, especially at lower spectral resolution where the unresolved LyA velocity offset is a convoluted function of several degenerate parameters. Referring to rest-frame ultraviolet and optical Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we find that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role in inducing a starburst that results in copious LyA emission, as well as perturbing the gas distribution and velocity field which have strong influence over the LyA emission line profile.
  • We present an analysis of the luminosities and equivalent widths of the 284 z < 0.56 [O II]-emitting galaxies found in the 169 square arcmin pilot survey for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). By combining emission-line fluxes obtained from the Mitchell spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope with deep broadband photometry from archival data, we derive each galaxy's de-reddened [O II] 3727 luminosity and calculate its total star formation rate. We show that over the last ~5 Gyr of cosmic time there has been substantial evolution in the [O II] emission-line luminosity function, with L* decreasing by ~0.6 +/-0.2 dex in the observed function, and by ~0.9 +/-0.2 dex in the de-reddened relation. Accompanying this decline is a significant shift in the distribution of [O II] equivalent widths, with the fraction of high equivalent-width emitters declining dramatically with time. Overall, the data imply that the relative intensity of star formation within galaxies has decreased over the past ~5 Gyr, and that the star formation rate density of the universe has declined by a factor of ~2.5 between z ~ 0.5 and z ~ 0. These observations represent the first [O II]-based star formation rate density measurements in this redshift range, and foreshadow the advancements which will be generated by the main HETDEX survey.
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of a z=0.99 galaxy cluster discovered using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). This is the first z~1 cluster candidate from the Massive Distant Clusters of WISE Survey (MaDCoWS) to be confirmed. It was selected as an overdensity of probable z>~1 sources using a combination of WISE and SDSS-DR8 photometric catalogs. Deeper follow-up imaging data from Subaru and WIYN reveal the cluster to be a rich system of galaxies, and multi-object spectroscopic observations from Keck confirm five cluster members at z=0.99. The detection and confirmation of this cluster represents a first step towards constructing a uniformly-selected sample of distant, high-mass galaxy clusters over the full extragalactic sky using WISE data.
  • We present results for the assembly and star formation histories of massive (~L*) red sequence galaxies in 11 spectroscopically confirmed, infrared-selected galaxy clusters at 1.0 < z < 1.5, the precursors to present-day massive clusters with M ~ 10^15 M_sun. Using rest-frame optical photometry, we investigate evolution in the color and scatter of the red sequence galaxy population, comparing with models of possible star formation histories. In contrast to studies of central cluster galaxies at lower redshift (z < 1), these data are clearly inconsistent with the continued evolution of stars formed and assembled primarily at a single, much-earlier time. Specifically, we find that the colors of massive cluster galaxies at z = 1.5 imply that the bulk of star formation occurred at z ~ 3, whereas by z = 1 their colors imply formation at z ~ 2; therefore these galaxies exhibit approximately the same luminosity-weighted stellar age at 1 < z < 1.5. This likely reflects star formation that occurs over an extended period, the effects of significant progenitor bias, or both. Our results generally indicate that massive cluster galaxy populations began forming a significant mass of stars at z >~ 4, contained some red spheroids by z ~ 1.5, and were actively assembling much of their final mass during 1 < z < 2 in the form of younger stars. Qualitatively, the slopes of the cluster color-magnitude relations are consistent with no significant evolution relative to local clusters.
  • We report the discovery of an IR-selected galaxy cluster in the IRAC Distant Cluster Survey (IDCS). New data from the Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopically confirm IDCS J1433.2+3306 at z = 1.89 with robust spectroscopic redshifts for seven members, two of which are based on the 4000 Angstrom break. Detected emission lines such as [OII] and Hbeta indicate star formation rates of >20 solar masses per year for three galaxies within a 500 kpc projected radius of the cluster center. The cluster exhibits a red sequence with a scatter and color indicative of a formation redshift z > 3.5. The stellar age of the early-type galaxy population is approximately consistent with those of clusters at lower redshift (1 < z < 1.5) suggesting that clusters at these redshifts are experiencing ongoing or increasing star formation.
  • We present the discovery of only the second radio-selected, z ~ 6 quasar. We identified SDSS J222843.54+011032.2 (z=5.95) by matching the optical detections of the deep Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 with their radio counterparts in the Stripe82 VLA Survey. We also matched the Canadian-France-Hawaiian Telescope Legacy Survey Wide (CFHTLS Wide) with the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey but have yet to find any z ~ 6 quasars in this survey area. The discovered quasar is optically-faint, z = 22.3 and M_{1450} ~ -24.5, but radio-bright, with a flux density of f$_{1.4GHz, peak}$ = 0.31mJy and a radio-loudness of R ~ 1100 (where R = f_{5GHz}/f_{2500}). The i-z color of the discovered quasar places it outside the color selection criteria for existing optical surveys. We conclude by discussing the need for deeper wide-area radio surveys in the context of high-redshift quasars.