• We demonstrate the fabrication of a single electron transistor device based on a single ultra-small silicon quantum dot connected to a gold break junction with a nanometer scale separation. The gold break junction is created through a controllable electromigration process and the individual silicon quantum dot in the junction is determined to be a Si_170 cluster. Differential conductance as a function of the bias and gate voltage clearly shows the Coulomb diamond which confirms that the transport is dominated by a single silicon quantum dot. It is found that the charging energy can be as large as 300meV, which is a result of the large capacitance of a small silicon quantum dot (1.8 nm). This large Coulomb interaction can potentially enable a single electron transistor to work at room temperature. The level spacing of the excited state can be as large as 10 meV, which enables us to manipulate individual spin via an external magnetic field. The resulting Zeeman splitting is measured and the lande factor of 2.3 is obtained, suggesting relatively weak electron-electron interaction in the silicon quantum dot which is beneficial for spin coherence time.
  • On the efforts of enhancing the spin orbit interaction (SOI) of graphene for seeking the dissipationless quantum spin Hall devices, unique Kane-Mele type SOI and high mobility samples are desired. However, common external decoration often introduces extrinsic Rashba-type SOI and simultaneous impurity scattering. Here we show, by the EDTA-Dy molecule dressing, the Kane-Mele type SOI is mimicked with even improved carrier mobility. It is evidenced by the suppressed weak localization at equal carrier densities and simultaneous Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation. The extracted spin scattering time is monotonically dependent on the carrier elastic scattering time, where the Elliot-Yafet plot gives the interaction strength of 3.3 meV. Improved quantum Hall plateaus can be even seen after the external operation. This is attributed to the spin-flexural phonon coupling induced by the enhanced graphene ripples, as revealed by the in-plane magnetotransport measurement.
  • In three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), the nontrivial topology in their electronic bands casts a gapless state on their solid surfaces, using which dissipationless TI edge devices based on the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect and quantum Hall (QH) effect have been demonstrated. Practical TI devices present a pair of parallel-transport topological surface states (TSSs) on their top and bottom surfaces. However, due to the no-go theorem, the two TSSs always appear as a pair and are expected to quantize synchronously. Quantized transport of a separate Dirac channel is still desirable, but has never been observed in graphene even after intense investigation over a period of 13 years, with the potential aim of half-QHE. By depositing Co atomic clusters, we achieved stepwise quantization of the top and bottom surfaces in BiSbTeSe2 (BSTS) TI devices. Renormalization group flow diagrams13, 22 (RGFDs) reveal two sets of converging points (CVPs) in the (Gxy, Gxx) space, where the top surface travels along an anomalous quantization trajectory while the bottom surface retains 1/2 e2/h. This results from delayed Landau-level (LL) hybridization (DLLH) due to coupling between Co clusters and TSS Fermions.
  • Here we report the evidence of the type II Dirac Fermion in the layered crystal PdTe2. The de Haas-van Alphen oscillations find a small Fermi pocket with a cross section of 0.077nm-2 with a nontrivial Berry phase. First-principal calculations reveal that it is originated from the hole pocket of a tilted Dirac cone. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy demonstrates a type II Dirac cone featured dispersion. We also suggest PdTe2 is an improved platform to host the topological superconductors.
  • The recent discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs offers the first Weyl fermion observed in nature and dramatically broadens the classification of topological phases. However, in TaAs it has proven challenging to study the rich transport phenomena arising from emergent Weyl fermions. The series Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are inversion-breaking, layered, tunable semimetals already under study as a promising platform for new electronics and recently proposed to host Type II, or strongly Lorentz-violating, Weyl fermions. Here we report the discovery of a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ at $x = 25\%$. We use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe a topological Fermi arc above the Fermi level, demonstrating a Weyl semimetal. The excellent agreement with calculation suggests that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is the first Type II Weyl semimetal. We also find that certain Weyl points are at the Fermi level, making Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ a promising platform for transport and optics experiments on Weyl semimetals.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • The unconventional magnetoresistance of ZrSiS single crystals is found unsaturated till the magnetic field of 53 T with the butterfly shaped angular dependence. Intense Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations resolve a bulk Dirac cone with a nontrivial Berry phase, where the Fermi surface area is 1.80*10^-3 {\AA}-2 and reaches the quantum limit before 20 T. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement reveals an electronic state with the two-dimensional nature around the X point of Brillouin zone boundary. By integrating the density functional theory calculations, ZrSiS is suggested to be a Dirac material with both surface and bulk Dirac bands.
  • Here we repair the single-layer MoSe2 field-effect transistors by the EDTA processing, after which the devices' room-temperature carrier mobility increases from 0.1 to over 70cm2/Vs. The atomic dynamics is constructed by the combined study of the first-principle calculation, aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Single/double Se vacancies are revealed originally, which cause some mid-gap impurity states and localize the device carriers. They are found repaired with the result of improved electronic transport. Such a picture is confirmed by a 1.5cm-1 red shift in the Raman spectra.
  • Recently, it has been theoretically predicted that Cd3As2 is a three dimensional Dirac material, a new topological phase discovered after topological insulators, which exhibits a linear energy dispersion in the bulk with massless Dirac fermions. Here, we report on the low-temperature magnetoresistance measurements on a ~50nm-thick Cd3As2 film. The weak antilocalization under perpendicular magnetic field is discussed based on the two-dimensional Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka (HLN) theory. The electron-electron interaction is addressed as the source of the dephasing based on the temperature-dependent scaling behavior. The weak antilocalization can be also observed while the magnetic field is parallel to the electric field due to the strong interaction between the different conductance channels in this quasi-two-dimensional film.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 Tesla. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully. Superconductivity sharply appears at a pressure of 2.5 GPa, rapidly reaching a maximum critical temperature (Tc) of 7 K at around 16.8 GPa, followed by a monotonic decrease in Tc with increasing pressure, thereby exhibiting the typical dome-shaped superconducting phase. From theoretical calculations, we interpret the low-pressure region of the superconducting dome to an enrichment of the density of states at the Fermi level and attribute the high-pressure decrease in Tc to possible structural instability. Thus, Tungsten ditelluride may provide a new platform for our understanding of superconductivity phenomena in transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • Unsaturated magnetoresistance (MR) has been reported in WTe2, and remains irrepressible up to very high field. Intense optimization of the crystalline quality causes a squarely-increasing MR, as interpreted by perfect compensation of opposite carriers. Herein we report our observation of linear MR (LMR) in WTe2 crystals, the onset of which is first identified by constructing the mobility spectra of the MR at low fields. The LMR further intensifies and predominates at fields higher than 20 Tesla while the parabolic MR gradually decays. The LMR remains unsaturated up to a high field of 60 Tesla and persists, even at a high pressure of 6.2 GPa. Assisted by density functional theory calculations and detailed mobility spectra, we find the LMR to be robust against the applications of high field, broken carrier balance, and mobility suppression. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals a unique quasilinear energy dispersion near the Fermi level. Our results suggest that the robust LMR is the low bound of the unsaturated MR in WTe2.
  • A lateral heterojunction of topological insulator Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 was successfully synthesized using a two-step solvothermal method. The two crystalline components were separated well by a sharp lattice-matched interface when the optimized procedure was used. Inspecting the heterojunction using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that epitaxial growth occurred along the horizontal plane. A rectification curve was observed at low temperatures. Quantum correction from the weak antilocalization reveals the transport of the topological surface state. There was, therefore, a staggered-gap lateral heterojunction with a small junction voltage, which is appealing for a platform for spin filters and one-dimensional topological interface states.
  • Nearly a decade after the discovery of topological insulators (TIs), the important task of identifying and characterizing their topological surface states through electrical transport experiments remains incomplete. The interpretation of these experiments is made difficult by the presence of residual bulk carriers and their coupling to surface states, which is not yet well understood. In this work, we present the first evidence for the existence and control of bulk-surface coupling in Bi2Te2Se nanoribbons, which are promising platforms for future TI-based devices. Our magnetoresistance measurements reveal that the number of coherent channels contributing to quantum interference in the nanoribbons changes abruptly when the film thickness exceeds the bulk phase relaxation length. We interpret this observation as an evidence for bulk-mediated coupling between metallic states located on opposite surfaces. This hypothesis is supported by additional magnetoresistance measurements conducted under a set of gate voltages and in a parallel magnetic field, the latter of which alters the intersurface coupling in a controllable way.
  • We report on the observation of the two-dimensional weak antilocalization in (Cu0.1Bi0.9)2Te3.06 crystals relying on measurements of the magnetoresistance in a tilted field. The dephasing analysis and scanning tunneling spectroscopy corroborate the transport of the topological surface states (SS). The SSs contribute 3.3% conductance in 30{\mu}m-thick material and become dominant in the 100nm-thick flakes. Such optimized topological SS transport is achieved by an intense aging process, when the bulk conductance is suppressed by four orders of magnitude in the long period. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that Cu atoms are initially inside the quintuple layers and migrate to the layer gaps to form Cu clusters during the aging. In combination with first-principles calculations, an atomic tunneling-clustering procedure across a diffusion barrier of 0.57eV is proposed.
  • Metallic Bi2Te3 crystalline sheets with the room-temperature resistivity of above 10 m{\Omega} cm were prepared and their magnetoresistive transport was measured in a field of up to 9 Tesla. The Shubnikov de Haas oscillations were identified from the secondly-derived magnetoresistance curves. While changing the angle between the field and normal axis of the sheets, we find that the oscillation periods present a cosine dependence on the angle. This indicates a two-dimensional transport due to the surface state. The work reveals a resolvable surface contribution to the overall conduction even in a metallic topological insulator.
  • The universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs), one of the most important manifestations of mesoscopic electronic interference, have not yet been demonstrated for the two-dimensional surface state of topological insulators (TIs). Even if one delicately suppresses the bulk conductance by improving the quality of TI crystals, the fluctuation of the bulk conductance still keeps competitive and difficult to be separated from the desired UCFs of surface carriers. Here we report on the experimental evidence of the UCFs of the two-dimensional surface state in the bulk insulating Bi2Te2Se nanoribbons. The solely-B\perp-dependent UCF is achieved and its temperature dependence is investigated. The surface transport is further revealed by weak antilocalizations. Such survived UCFs of the topological surface states result from the limited dephasing length of the bulk carriers in ternary crystals. The electron-phonon interaction is addressed as a secondary source of the surface state dephasing based on the temperature-dependent scaling behavior.
  • Anisotropic plasmon coupling in closely-spaced chains of Ag nanoparticles was visualized using the electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For dimers as the simplest chain, mapping the plasmon excitations with nanometers' spatial resolution and 0.27 eV energy resolution intuitively identified two coupling plasmons. The in-phase mode redshifted from the ultraviolet region as the inter-particle spacing was reduced, reaching the visible range at 2.7 eV. Calculations based on the discrete dipole approximation confirmed its optical activeness, where the longitudinal direction was constructed as the path for light transportation. Two coupling paths were then observed in an inflexed 4-particle chain.
  • Here we demonstrate the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) interference of the topological surface states on the exfoliated Bi2Te3 microflakes by a flux period of h/2e in their magnetoresistance oscillations and its weak field character. Both the osillations with the period of h/e and h/2e are observed. The h/2e-period AAS oscillation gradually dominates with increasing the sample widths and the temperatures. This reveals the transition of the Dirac Fermions' transport to the diffusive regime.
  • Thin Bi2Te3 flakes, with as few as 3 quintuple layers, are optically visualized on the SiO2-capped Si substrates. Their optical contrasts vary with the illumination wavelength, flake thickness and capping layers. The maximum contrast appears at the optimized light with the 570nm wavelength. The contrast turns reversed when the flake is reduced to less than 20 quintuple layers. A calculation based on the Fresnel law describes the above observation with the constructions of the layer number-wave length-contrast three-dimensional (3D) diagram and the cap thickness-wavelength-contrast 3D diagram, applicative in the current studies of topological insulating flakes.
  • Carbon atoms are counted at near atomic-level precision using a scanning transmission electron microscope calibrated by carbon nanocluster mass standards. A linear calibration curve governs the working zone from a few carbon atoms up to 34,000 atoms. This linearity enables adequate averaging of the scattering cross sections, imparting the experiment with near atomic-level precision despite the use of a coarse mass reference. An example of this approach is provided for thin layers of stacked graphene sheets. Suspended sheets with a thickness below 100 nm are visualized, providing quantitative measurement in a regime inaccessible to optical and scanning probe methods.
  • Few-layer graphene sheets are prepared by splitting the expanded graphites using a high-power sonication. Atomic-level quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM) is employed to carry out the efficient layer statisticsm, enabling global optimization of the experimental conditions. A two-step splitting mechanism is thus revealed, in which the mean layer number was firstly reduced to less than 20 by heating to 1100{\deg}C and then tuned to the few-layer region by a 5-minute 104W/litre sonication. Raman spectroscopic analysis confirms the above mechanism and demonstrates that the sheets are largely free of defects and oxides.
  • In this article, we will present the first experimental observation of nanojets formed by heating PbO-coated Pb clusters, which has been predicted theoretically by M. Moseler and U Landman. During the heating, the hot liquid ejects through the broken orifice into vacuum, and forms a condensed trail in the tadpole shape as shown in the TEM micrographs. The temperature-variable Raman spectra indicates that the nanojet formation is closely related to the heating temperature and thus essentially to the internal pressure in the coated clusters. The pressure inside the shell, which rises from the inner core's melting and its confined volume expansion and then drops after the final explosion, dominates the whole nanojetting process.
  • The atomic deposited BN films with the thickness of nanometers (ABN) were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and the nanostructured BN films (CBN) were prepared by Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition. UV-Vis Absorption measurement proves the band gap of 4.27eV and field emission of the BN films were carried out. F-N plots of all the samples give a good fitting and demonstrate the F-N tunneling of the emission process. The emission of ABN begins at the electric field of 14.6 V/{\mu}m while that of CBN starts at 5.10V/{\mu}m. Emission current density of 1mA/cm2 for ABN needs the field of 20V/{\mu}m while that of CBN needs only 12.1V/{\mu}m. The cluster-deposited BN on n-type Silicon substrate proves a good performance in terms of the lower gauge voltage, more emission sites and higher electron intensity and seems a promising substitute for the cascade of Field Emission.
  • The films with the discrete diamond-like-carbon nanoparticles were prepared by the deposition of the carbon nanoparticle beam. Their morphologies were imaged by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The nanoparticles were found distributed on the silicon (100) substrate discretely. The semisphere shapes of the nanoparticles were demonstrated by the AFM line profile. EELS was measured and the sp3 ratio as high as 86% was found. The field-induced electron emission of the as-prepared cascade (nanoDLC/ Si) was tested and the current density of 1mA/cm2 was achieved at 10.2V/{\mu}m.