• The phenomenon of phase separation into antiferromagnetic (AFM) and superconducting (SC) or normal-state regions has great implication for the origin of high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity. However, the occurrence of an intrinsic antiferromagnetism above the Tc of (Li, Fe)OHFeSe superconductor is questioned. Here we report a systematic study on a series of (Li, Fe)OHFeSe single crystal samples with Tc up to ~41 K. We observe an evident drop in the static magnetization at Tafm ~125 K, in some of the SC (Tc < ~38 K, cell parameter c < ~9.27 {\AA}) and non-SC samples. We verify that this AFM signal is intrinsic to (Li, Fe)OHFeSe. Thus, our observations indicate mesoscopic-to-macroscopic coexistence of an AFM state with the normal (below Tafm) or SC (below Tc) state in (Li, Fe)OHFeSe. We explain such coexistence by electronic phase separation, similar to that in high-Tc cuprates and iron arsenides. However, such an AFM signal can be absent in some other samples of (Li, Fe)OHFeSe, particularly it is never observed in the SC samples of Tc > ~38 K, owing to a spatial scale of the phase separation too small for the macroscopic magnetic probe. For this case, we propose a microscopic electronic phase separation. It is suggested that the microscopic static phase separation reaches vanishing point in high-Tc (Li, Fe)OHFeSe, by the occurrence of two-dimensional AFM spin fluctuations below nearly the same temperature as Tafm reported previously for a (Li, Fe)OHFeSe (Tc ~42 K) single crystal. A complete phase diagram is thus established. Our study provides key information of the underlying physics for high-Tc superconductivity.
  • One of the most strikingly universal features of the high temperature superconductors is that the superconducting phase emerges in the close proximity of the antiferromagnetic phase, and the interplay between these two phases poses a long standing challenge. It is commonly believed that,as the antiferromagnetic transition temperature is continuously suppressed to zero, there appears a quantum critical point, around which the existence of antiferromagnetic fluctuation is responsible for the development of the superconductivity. In contrast to this scenario, we report the discovery of a bi-critical point identified at 2.88 GPa and 26.02 K in the pressurized high quality single crystal Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 by complementary in situ high pressure measurements. At the critical pressure, we find that the antiferromagnetism suddenly disappears and superconductivity simultaneously emerges at almost the same temperature, and that the external magnetic field suppresses the superconducting transition temperature but hardly affects the antiferromagnetic transition temperature.
  • This study aims to unravel the mechanism of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) observed in n-type HgCr$_2$Se$_4$, in which low-density conduction electrons are exchange-coupled to a three-dimensional Heisenberg ferromagnet with a Curie temperature $T_C\approx$ 105 K. Near room temperature the electron transport exhibits an ordinary semiconducting behavior. As temperature drops below $T^*\simeq2.1T_C$, the magnetic susceptibility deviates from the Curie-Weiss law, and concomitantly the transport enters an intermediate regime exhibiting a pronounced CMR effect before a transition to metallic conduction occurs at $T<T_C$. Our results suggest an important role of spin correlations not only near the critical point, but also for a wide range of temperatures ($T_C<T<T^*$) in the paramagnetic phase. In this intermediate temperature regime the transport undergoes a percolation type of transition from isolated magnetic polarons to a continuous network when temperature is lowered or magnetic field becomes stronger.
  • The role played by the insulating intermediate (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OH layer on magnetic and superconducting properties of (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OHFe$_{0.98}$Se was studied by means of muon-spin rotation. It was found that it is not only enhances the coupling between the FeSe layers for temperatures below $\simeq 10$ K, but becomes superconducting by itself due to the proximity to the FeSe ones. Superconductivity in (Li$_{0.84}$Fe$_{0.16}$)OH layers is most probably filamentary-like and the energy gap value, depending on the order parameter symmetry, does not exceed 1-1.5 meV.
  • A large and high-quality single crystal (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, the optimal superconductor of newly reported (Li1-xFex)OHFe1-ySe system, has been successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal ion-exchange technique. The superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of 42 K is determined by magnetic susceptibility and electric resistivity measurements, and the zero-temperature upper critical magnetic fields are evaluated as 79 and 313 Tesla for the field along the c-axis and the ab-plane, respectively. The ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane electric resistivity,\r{ho}c/\r{ho}ab, is found to increases with decreasing temperature and to reach a high value of 2500 at 50 K, with an evident kink occurring at a characteristic temperature T*=120 K. The negative in-plane Hall coefficient indicates that electron carriers dominate in the charge transport, and the hole contribution is significantly reduced as the temperature is lowered to approach T*. From T* down to Tc, we observe the linear temperature dependences of the in-plane electric resistivity and the magnetic susceptibility for the FeSe layers. Our findings thus reveal that the normal state of (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se becomes highly two-dimensional and anomalous prior to the superconducting transition, providing a new insight into the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity.
  • Within a mean-field approximation, the ground state and finite temperature phase diagrams of the two-dimensional Kondo lattice model have been carefully studied as functions of the Kondo coupling $J$ and the conduction electron concentration $n_{c}$. In addition to the conventional hybridization between local moments and itinerant electrons, a staggered hybridization is proposed to characterize the interplay between the antiferromagnetism and the Kondo screening effect. As a result, a heavy fermion antiferromagnetic phase is obtained and separated from the pure antiferromagnetic ordered phase by a first-order Lifshitz phase transition, while a continuous phase transition exists between the heavy fermion antiferromagnetic phase and the Kondo paramagnetic phase. We have developed a efficient theory to calculate these phase boundaries. As $n_{c}$ decreases from the half-filling, the region of the heavy fermion antiferromagnetic phase shrinks and finally disappears at a critical point $n_{c}^{*}=0.8228$, leaving a first-order critical line between the pure antiferromagnetic phase and the Kondo paramagnetic phase for $n_{c}<n_{c}^{* }$. At half-filling limit, a finite temperature phase diagram is also determined on the Kondo coupling and temperature ($J$-$T$) plane. Notably, as the temperature is increased, the region of the heavy fermion antiferromagnetic phase is reduced continuously, and finally converges to a single point, together with the pure antiferromagnetic phase and the Kondo paramagnetic phase. The phase diagrams with such triple point may account for the observed phase transitions in related heavy fermion materials.
  • The recent discovery of large and non-saturating magnetoresistance (LMR) in WTe2 provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. Here we report the first observation of superconductivity near the proximity of suppressed LMR state in pressurized WTe2 through high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance, and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is found that the positive magnetoresistance effect can be turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa without crystal structure change and superconductivity emerges simultaneously. The maximum superconducting transition temperature can be reached to 6.5 K at ~15 GPa and it decreases down to 2.6 K at ~25 GPa. In-situ high pressure Hall coefficient measurements at 10 K demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases hole carrier's population but increases electron carrier's population. Significantly, at the critical pressure, we observed a sign change in the Hall coefficient, indicating a possible Lifshitz-type quantum phase transition in WTe2.
  • Previous experimental results have shown important differences between iron selenide and arsenide superconductors, which seem to suggest that the high temperature superconductivity in these two subgroups of iron-based family may arise from different electronic ground states. Here, we report the complete phase diagram of a newly synthesized superconducting (SC) system (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe with a similar structure to FeAs-based superconductors. In the non-SC samples, an antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin-density-wave (SDW) transition occurs at ~127 K. This is the first example to demonstrate such an SDW phase in FeSe-based superconductor system. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that a well-known sqrr(5) x sqrr(5) iron vacancy ordered state, resulting in an AFM order at ~ 500K in AyFe2-xSe2 (A = metal ions) superconductor system, is absent in both non-SC and SC samples, but a unique superstructure with a modulation wave vector q=1/2(1, 1, 0), identical to that seen in SC phase of KyFe2-xSe2, is dominant in the optimal SC sample (with an SC transition temperature Tc = 40 K). Hence, we conclude that the high-Tc superconductivity in (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe stems from the similarly weak AFM fluctuations as FeAs-based superconductors, suggesting a universal physical picture for both iron selenide and arsenide superconductors.
  • We use scanning tunneling microscopy to investigate the (001) surface of cleaved SmB6 Kondo insulator. Variable temperature dI/dV spectroscopy up to 60 K reveals a gap-like density of state suppression around the Fermi level, which is due to the hybridization between the itinerant Sm 5d band and localized Sm 4f band. At temperatures below 40 K, a sharp coherence peak emerges within the hybridization gap near the lower gap edge. We propose that the in-gap resonance state is due to a collective excitation in magnetic origin with the presence of spin-orbital coupling and mixed valence fluctuations. These results shed new lights on the electronic structure evolution and transport anomaly in SmB6.