• Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides complementary analysis modalities to those of high-field NMR and allows for ultra-high-resolution spectroscopy and measurement of untruncated spin-spin interactions. Unlike for the high-field case, however, universal quantum control -- the ability to perform arbitrary unitary operations -- has not been experimentally demonstrated in zero-field NMR. This is because the Larmor frequency for all spins is identically zero at zero field, making it challenging to individually address different spin species. We realize a composite-pulse technique for arbitrary independent rotations of $^1$H and $^{13}$C spins in a two-spin system. Quantum-information-inspired randomized benchmarking and state tomography are used to evaluate the quality of the control. We experimentally demonstrate single-spin control for $^{13}$C with an average gate fidelity of $0.9960(2)$ and two-spin control via a controlled-not (CNOT) gate with an estimated fidelity of $0.99$. The combination of arbitrary single-spin gates and a CNOT gate is sufficient for universal quantum control of the nuclear spin system. The realization of complete spin control in zero-field NMR is an essential step towards applications to quantum simulation, entangled-state-assisted quantum metrology, and zero-field NMR spectroscopy.
  • Superposition, arguably the most fundamental property of quantum mechanics, lies at the heart of quantum information science. However, how to create the superposition of any two unknown pure states remains as a daunting challenge. Recently, it is proved that such a quantum protocol does not exist if the two input states are completely unknown, whereas a probabilistic protocol is still available with some prior knowledge about the input states [M. Oszmaniec \emph{et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 110403 (2016)]. The knowledge is that both of the two input states have nonzero overlaps with some given referential state. In this work, we experimentally realize the probabilistic protocol of superposing two pure states in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance system. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by preparing a families of input states, and the average fidelity between the prepared state and expected superposition state is over 99%. Moreover, we experimentally illustrate the limitation of the protocol that it is likely to fail or yields very low fidelity, if the nonzero overlaps are approaching zero. Our experimental implementation can be extended to more complex situations and other quantum systems.
  • Quantum computers promise to outperform their classical counterparts in many applications. Rapid experimental progress in the last two decades includes the first demonstrations of small-scale quantum processors, but realising large-scale quantum information processors capable of universal quantum control remains a challenge. One primary obstacle is the inadequacy of classical computers for the task of optimising the experimental control field as we scale up to large systems. Classical optimisation procedures require a simulation of the quantum system and have a running time that grows exponentially with the number of quantum bits (qubits) in the system. Here we show that it is possible to tackle this problem by using the quantum processor to optimise its own control fields. Using measurement-based quantum feedback control (MQFC), we created a 12-coherence state with the essential control pulse completely designed by a 12-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor. The results demonstrate the superiority of MQFC over classical optimisation methods, in both efficiency and accuracy. The time required for MQFC optimisation is linear in the number of qubits, and our 12-qubit system beat a classical computer configured with 2.4 GHz CPU and 8 GB memory. Furthermore, the fidelity of the MQFC-prepared 12-coherence was about 10% better than the best result using classical optimisation, since the feedback approach inherently corrects for unknown imperfections in the quantum processor. As MQFC is readily transferrable to other technologies for universal quantum information processors, we anticipate that this result will open the way to scalably and precisely control quantum systems, bringing us closer to a demonstration of quantum supremacy.
  • To exploit a given physical system for quantum information processing, it is critical to understand the different types of noise affecting quantum control. Distinguishing coherent and incoherent errors is extremely useful as they can be reduced in different ways. Coherent errors are generally easier to reduce at the hardware level, e.g. by improving calibration, whereas some sources of incoherent errors, e.g. T2* processes, can be reduced by engineering robust pulses. In this work, we illustrate how purity benchmarking and randomized benchmarking can be used together to distinguish between coherent and incoherent errors and to quantify the reduction in both of them due to using optimal control pulses and accounting for the transfer function in an electron spin resonance system. We also prove that purity benchmarking provides bounds on the optimal fidelity and diamond norm that can be achieved by correcting the coherent errors through improving calibration.
  • Spin systems controlled and probed by magnetic resonance have been valuable for testing the ideas of quantum control and quantum error correction. This paper introduces an X-band pulsed electron spin resonance spectrometer designed for high-fidelity coherent control of electron spins, including a loop-gap resonator for sub-millimeter sized samples with a control bandwidth ~ 40 MHz. Universal control is achieved by a single-sideband upconversion technique with an I-Q modulator and a 1.2 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. A single qubit randomized benchmarking protocol quantifies the average errors of Clifford gates implemented by simple Gaussian pulses, using a sample of gamma-irradiated quartz. Improvements in unitary gate fidelity are achieved through phase transient correction and hardware optimization. A preparation pulse sequence that selects spin packets in a narrowed distribution of static fields confirms that inhomogeneous dephasing (1/T2*) is the dominant source of gate error. The best average fidelity over the Clifford gates obtained here is 99.2%, which serves as a benchmark to compare with other technologies.
  • The ability to perform quantum error correction is a significant hurdle for scalable quantum information processing. A key requirement for multiple-round quantum error correction is the ability to dynamically extract entropy from ancilla qubits. Heat-bath algorithmic cooling is a method that uses quantum logic operations to move entropy from one subsystem to another, and permits cooling of a spin qubit below the closed system (Shannon) bound. Gamma-irradiated, $^{13}$C-labeled malonic acid provides up to 5 spin qubits: 1 spin-half electron and 4 spin-half nuclei. The nuclei are strongly hyperfine coupled to the electron and can be controlled either by exploiting the anisotropic part of the hyperfine interaction or by using pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The electron connects the nuclei to a heat-bath with a much colder effective temperature determined by the electron's thermal spin polarization. By accurately determining the full spin Hamiltonian and performing realistic algorithmic simulations, we show that an experimental demonstration of heat-bath algorithmic cooling beyond the Shannon bound is feasible in both 3-qubit and 5-qubit variants of this spin system. Similar techniques could be useful for polarizing nuclei in molecular or crystalline systems that allow for non-equilibrium optical polarization of the electron spin.
  • Application of multiple rounds of Quantum Error Correction (QEC) is an essential milestone towards the construction of scalable quantum information processing devices. However, experimental realizations of it are still in their infancy. The requirements for multiple round QEC are high control fidelity and the ability to extract entropy from ancilla qubits. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) based quantum devices have demonstrated high control fidelity with up to 12 qubits. On the other hand, the major challenge in the NMR QEC experiment is to efficiently supply ancilla qubits in highly pure states at the beginning of each round of QEC. Purification of qubits in NMR, or in other ensemble based quantum systems can be accomplished through Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling (HBAC). It is an efficient method for extracting entropy from qubits that interact with a heat bath, allowing cooling below the bath temperature. For practical HBAC, coupled electron-nuclear spin systems are more promising than conventional NMR quantum processors, since electron spin polarization is about $10^3$ times greater than that of a proton under the same experimental conditions. We provide an overview on both theoretical and experimental aspects of HBAC focusing on spin and magnetic resonance based systems, and discuss the prospects of exploiting electron-nuclear coupled systems for the realization of HBAC and multiple round QEC.
  • Due to its geometric nature, holonomic quantum computation is fault-tolerant against certain types of control errors. Although proposed more than a decade ago, the experimental realization of holonomic quantum computation is still an open challenge. In this Letter, we report the first experimental demonstration of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in liquid NMR quantum information processors. Two non-commuting holonomic single-qubit gates, rotations about x-axis and about z-axis, and the two-qubit holonomic control-NOT gate are realized with high fidelity by evolving the work qubits and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically. The successful realization of these universal elementary gates in nonadiabatic quantum computing demonstrates the experimental feasibility and the fascinating feature of this fast and resilient quantum computing paradigm.
  • Anyons have exotic statistical properties, fractional statistics, differing from Bosons and Fermions. They can be created as excitations of some Hamiltonian models. Here we present an experimental demonstration of anyonic fractional statistics by simulating a version of the Kitaev spin lattice model proposed by Han et al[Phys. Rev.Lett. 98, 150404 (2007)] using an NMR quantum information processor. We use a 7-qubit system to prepare a 6-qubit pseudopure state to implement the ground state preparation and realize anyonic manipulations, including creation, braiding and anyon fusion. A $\pi/2\times 2$ phase difference between the states with and without anyon braiding, which is equivalent to two successive particle exchanges, is observed. This is different from the $\pi\times 2$ and $2\pi \times 2$ phases for Fermions and Bosons after two successive particle exchanges, and is consistent with the fractional statistics of anyons.