• We are concerned with the nonlinear stability of vortex sheets for the relativistic Euler equations in three-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. This is a nonlinear hyperbolic problem with a characteristic free boundary. In this paper, we introduce a new symmetrization by choosing appropriate functions as primary unknowns. A necessary and sufficient condition for the weakly linear stability of relativistic vortex sheets is obtained by analyzing the roots of the Lopatinski\u{\i} determinant associated to the constant coefficient linearized problem. Under this stability condition, we show that the variable coefficient linearized problem obeys an energy estimate with a loss of derivatives. The construction of certain weight functions plays a crucial role in absorbing error terms caused by microlocalization. Based on the weakly linear stability result, we establish the existence and nonlinear stability of relativistic vortex sheets under small initial perturbations by a Nash--Moser iteration scheme.
  • We are concerned with the regularity of solutions of the Lighthill problem for shock diffraction by a convex corned wedge, which can be formulated as a free boundary problem. In this paper, we prove that there is no regular solution that is subsonic up to the wedge corner for potential flow. This indicates that, if the solution is subsonic at the wedge corner, at least a characteristic discontinuity (vortex sheet or entropy wave) is expected to be generated, which is consistent with the experimental and computational results. In order to achieve the non-existence result, a weak maximum principle for the solution is established, and several other mathematical techniques are developed. The methods and techniques developed here are also useful to the other problems with similar difficulties.
  • We give a new proof for the local existence of a smooth isometric embedding of a smooth $3$-dimensional Riemannian manifold with nonzero Riemannian curvature tensor into $6$-dimensional Euclidean space. Our proof avoids the sophisticated arguments via microlocal analysis used in earlier proofs. In Part 1, we introduce a new type of system of partial differential equations, which is not one of the standard types (elliptic, hyperbolic, parabolic) but satisfies a property called strong symmetric positivity. Such a PDE system is a generalization of and has properties similar to a system of ordinary differential equations with a regular singular point. A local existence theorem is then established by using a novel local-to-global-to-local approach. In Part 2, we apply this theorem to prove the local existence result for isometric embeddings.
  • We are concerned with underlying connections between fluids, elasticity, isometric embedding of Riemannian manifolds, and the existence of wrinkled solutions of the associated nonlinear partial differential equations. In this paper, we develop such connections for the case of two spatial dimensions, and demonstrate that the continuum mechanical equations can be mapped into a corresponding geometric framework and the inherent direct application of the theory of isometric embeddings and the Gauss-Codazzi equations through examples for the Euler equations for fluids and the Euler-Lagrange equations for elastic solids. These results show that the geometric theory provides an avenue for addressing the admissibility criteria for nonlinear conservation laws in continuum mechanics.
  • We are concerned with the stability of multidimensional (M-D) transonic shocks in steady supersonic flow past multidimensional wedges. One of our motivations is that the global stability issue for the M-D case is much more sensitive than that for the 2-D case, which requires more careful rigorous mathematical analysis. In this paper, we develop a nonlinear approach and employ it to establish the stability of weak shock solutions containing a transonic shock-front for potential flow with respect to the M-D perturbation of the wedge boundary in appropriate function spaces. To achieve this, we first formulate the stability problem as a free boundary problem for nonlinear elliptic equations. Then we introduce the partial hodograph transformation to reduce the free boundary problem into a fixed boundary value problem near a background solution with fully nonlinear boundary conditions for second-order nonlinear elliptic equations in an unbounded domain. To solve this reduced problem, we linearize the nonlinear problem on the background shock solution and then, after solving this linearized elliptic problem, develop a nonlinear iteration scheme that is proved to be contractive.
  • In this paper, we study the active hydrodynamics, described in the Q-tensor liquid crystal framework. We prove the existence of global weak solutions in dimension two and three, with suitable initial datas. By using Littlewood-Paley decomposition, we also get the higher regularity of the weak solutions and the uniqueness of weak-strong solutions in dimension two.
  • We establish the existence, stability, and asymptotic behavior of transonic flows with a transonic shock past a curved wedge for the steady full Euler equations in an important physical regime, which form a nonlinear system of mixed-composite hyperbolic-elliptic type. To achieve this, we first employ the coordinate transformation of Euler-Lagrange type and then exploit one of the new equations to identify a potential function in Lagrangian coordinates. By capturing the conservation properties of the Euler system, we derive a single second-order nonlinear elliptic equation for the potential function in the subsonic region so that the transonic shock problem is reformulated as a one-phase free boundary problem for a second-order nonlinear elliptic equation with the shock-front as a free boundary. One of the advantages of this approach is that, given the shock location or quivalently the entropy function along the shock-front downstream, all the physical variables can expressed as functions of the gradient of the potential function, and the downstream asymptotic behavior of the potential function at the infinite exit can be uniquely determined with uniform decay rate. To solve the free boundary problem, we employ the hodograph transformation to transfer the free boundary to a fixed boundary, while keeping the ellipticity of the second-order equations, and then update the entropy function to prove that it has a fixed point. Another advantage in our analysis here is in the context of the real full Euler equations so that the solutions do not necessarily obey Bernoulli's law with a uniform Bernoulli constant, that is, the Bernoulli constant is allowed to change for different fluid trajectories.
  • We are concerned with the two-dimensional steady supersonic reacting Euler flow past Lipschitz bending walls that are small perturbations of a convex one, and establish the existence of global entropy solutions when the total variation of both the initial data and the slope of the boundary is sufficiently small. The flow is governed by an ideal polytropic gas and undergoes a one-step exothermic chemical reaction under the reaction rate function that is Lipschtiz and has a positive lower bound. The heat released by the reaction may cause the total variation of the solution to increase along the flow direction. We employ the modified wave-front tracking scheme to construct approximate solutions and develop a Glimm-type functional by incorporating the approximate strong rarefaction waves and Lipschitz bending walls to obtain the uniform bound on the total variation of the approximate solutions. Then we employ this bound to prove the convergence of the approximate solutions to a global entropy solution that contains a strong rarefaction wave generated by the Lipschitz bending wall. In addition, the asymptotic behavior of the entropy solution in the flow direction is also analyzed.
  • This is an introduction to The Theme Issue on "Free Boundary Problems and Related Topics", which consists of 14 survey/review articles on the topics, of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Physical, Mathematical and Engineering Sciences, 373, no. 2050, The Royal Society, 2015.
  • We are concerned with the global existence of entropy solutions of the two-dimensional steady Euler equations for an ideal gas, which undergoes a one-step exothermic chemical reaction under the Arrhenius-type kinetics. The reaction rate function $\phi(T)$ is assumed to have a positive lower bound. We first consider the Cauchy problem (the initial value problem), that is, seek a supersonic downstream reacting flow when the incoming flow is supersonic, and establish the global existence of entropy solutions when the total variation of the initial data is sufficiently small. Then we analyze the problem of steady supersonic, exothermically reacting Euler flow past a Lipschitz wedge, generating an additional detonation wave attached to the wedge vertex, which can be then formulated as an initial-boundary value problem. We establish the globally existence of entropy solutions containing the additional detonation wave (weak or strong, determined by the wedge angle at the wedge vertex) when the total variation of both the slope of the wedge boundary and the incoming flow is suitably small. The downstream asymptotic behavior of the global solutions is also obtained.
  • We present a new approach to analyze the validation of weakly nonlinear geometric optics for entropy solutions of nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation laws whose eigenvalues are allowed to have constant multiplicity and corresponding characteristic fields to be linearly degenerate. The approach is based on our careful construction of more accurate auxiliary approximation to weakly nonlinear geometric optics, the properties of wave front-tracking approximate solutions, the behavior of solutions to the approximate asymptotic equations, and the standard semigroup estimates. To illustrate this approach more clearly, we focus first on the Cauchy problem for the hyperbolic systems with compact support initial data of small bounded variation and establish that the $L^1-$estimate between the entropy solution and the geometric optics expansion function is bounded by $O(\varepsilon^2)$, {\it independent of} the time variable. This implies that the simpler geometric optics expansion functions can be employed to study the behavior of general entropy solutions to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Finally, we extend the results to the case with non-compact support initial data of bounded variation.
  • In our previous work, we have established the existence of transonic characteristic discontinuities separating supersonic flows from a static gas in two-dimensional steady compressible Euler flows under a perturbation with small total variation of the incoming supersonic flow over a solid right-wedge. It is a free boundary problem in Eulerian coordinates and, across the free boundary (characteristic discontinuity), the Euler equations are of elliptic-hyperbolic composite-mixed type. In this paper, we further prove that such a transonic characteristic discontinuity solution is unique and $L^1$--stable with respect to the small perturbation of the incoming supersonic flow in Lagrangian coordinates.
  • We are concerned with global steady subsonic flows through general infinitely long nozzles for the full Euler equations. The problem is formulated as a boundary value problem in the unbounded domain for a nonlinear elliptic equation of second order in terms of the stream function. It is established that, when the oscillation of the entropy and Bernoulli functions at the upstream is sufficiently small in $C^{1,1}$ and the mass flux is in a suitable regime, there exists a unique global subsonic solution in a suitable class of general nozzles. The assumptions are required to prevent from the occurrence of supersonic bubbles inside the nozzles. The asymptotic behavior of subsonic flows at the downstream and upstream, as well as the critical mass flux, have been clarified.
  • We present our recent results on the Prandtl-Meyer reflection for supersonic potential flow past a solid ramp. When a steady supersonic flow passes a solid ramp, there are two possible configurations: the weak shock solution and the strong shock solution. Elling-Liu's theorem (2008) indicates that the steady supersonic weak shock solution can be regarded as a long-time asymptotics of an unsteady flow for a class of physical parameters determined by certain assumptions for potential flow. In this paper we discuss our recent progress in removing these assumptions and establishing the stability theorem for steady supersonic weak shock solutions as the long-time asymptotics of unsteady flows for all the physical parameters for potential flow. We apply new mathematical techniques developed in our recent work to obtain monotonicity properties and uniform apriori estimates for weak solutions, which allow us to employ the Leray-Schauder degree argument to complete the theory for the general case.
  • The isometric embedding problem is a fundamental problem in differential geometry. A longstanding problem is considered in this paper to characterize intrinsic metrics on a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold which can be realized as isometric immersions into the three-dimensional Euclidean space. A remarkable connection between gas dynamics and differential geometry is discussed. It is shown how the fluid dynamics can be used to formulate a geometry problem. The equations of gas dynamics are first reviewed. Then the formulation using the fluid dynamic variables in conservation laws of gas dynamics is presented for the isometric embedding problem in differential geometry.
  • We establish the vanishing viscosity limit of the Navier-Stokes equations to the isentropic Euler equations for one-dimensional compressible fluid flow. For the Navier-Stokes equations, there exist no natural invariant regions for the equations with the real physical viscosity term so that the uniform sup-norm of solutions with respect to the physical viscosity coefficient may not be directly controllable and, furthermore, convex entropy-entropy flux pairs may not produce signed entropy dissipation measures. To overcome these difficulties, we first develop uniform energy-type estimates with respect to the viscosity coefficient for the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations and establish the existence of measure-valued solutions of the isentropic Euler equations generated by the Navier-Stokes equations. Based on the uniform energy-type estimates and the features of the isentropic Euler equations, we establish that the entropy dissipation measures of the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for weak entropy-entropy flux pairs, generated by compactly supported $C^2$ test functions, are confined in a compact set in $H^{-1}$, which lead to the existence of measure-valued solutions that are confined by the Tartar-Murat commutator relation. A careful characterization of the unbounded support of the measure-valued solution confined by the commutator relation yields the reduction of the measure-valued solution to a Delta mass, which leads to the convergence of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to a finite-energy entropy solution of the isentropic Euler equations.
  • When a plane shock hits a wedge head on, it experiences a reflection-diffraction process, and then a self-similar reflected shock moves outward as the original shock moves forward in time. The complexity of reflection-diffraction configurations was first reported by Ernst Mach in 1878, and experimental, computational, and asymptotic analysis has shown that various patterns of shock reflection-diffraction configurations may occur, including regular reflection and Mach reflection. In this paper we start with various shock reflection-diffraction phenomena, their fundamental scientific issues, and their theoretical roles as building blocks and asymptotic attractors of general solutions in the mathematical theory of multidimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Then we describe how the global problem of shock reflection-diffraction by a wedge can be formulated as a free boundary problem for nonlinear conservation laws of mixed-composite hyperbolic-elliptic type. Finally we discuss some recent developments in attacking the shock reflection-diffraction problem, including the existence, stability, and regularity of global regular reflection-diffraction solutions. The approach includes techniques to handle free boundary problems, degenerate elliptic equations, and corner singularities, which is highly motivated by experimental, computational, and asymptotic results. Further trends and open problems in this direction are also addressed.
  • We establish the weak continuity of the Gauss-Coddazi-Ricci system for isometric embedding with respect to the uniform $L^p$-bounded solution sequence for $p>2$, which implies that the weak limit of the isometric embeddings of the manifold is still an isometric embedding. More generally, we establish a compensated compactness framework for the Gauss-Codazzi-Ricci system in differential geometry. That is, given any sequence of approximate solutions to this system which is uniformly bounded in $L^2$ and has reasonable bounds on the errors made in the approximation (the errors are confined in a compact subset of $H^{-1}_{\text{loc}}$), then the approximating sequence has a weakly convergent subsequence whose limit is a solution of the Gauss-Codazzi-Ricci system. Furthermore, a minimizing problem is proposed as a selection criterion. For these, no restriction on the Riemann curvature tensor is made.
  • We study the initial-boundary value problem of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids in a general domain in $\R^n$ with compact and smooth boundary, subject to the kinematic and vorticity boundary conditions on the non-flat boundary. We observe that, under the nonhomogeneous boundary conditions, the pressure $p$ can be still recovered by solving the Neumann problem for the Poisson equation. Then we establish the well-posedness of the unsteady Stokes equations and employ the solution to reduce our initial-boundary value problem into an initial-boundary value problem with absolute boundary conditions. Based on this, we first establish the well-posedness for an appropriate local linearized problem with the absolute boundary conditions and the initial condition (without the incompressibility condition), which establishes a velocity mapping. Then we develop \emph{apriori} estimates for the velocity mapping, especially involving the Sobolev norm for the time-derivative of the mapping to deal with the complicated boundary conditions, which leads to the existence of the fixed point of the mapping and the existence of solutions to our initial-boundary value problem. Finally, we establish that, when the viscosity coefficient tends zero, the strong solutions of the initial-boundary value problem in $\R^n (n\ge 3)$ with nonhomogeneous vorticity boundary condition converges in $L^2$ to the corresponding Euler equations satisfying the kinematic condition.
  • We study the initial-boundary value problem of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluids in a domain in $\R^3$ with compact and smooth boundary, subject to the kinematic and Navier boundary conditions. We first reformulate the Navier boundary condition in terms of the vorticity, which is motivated by the Hodge theory on manifolds with boundary from the viewpoint of differential geometry, and establish basic elliptic estimates for vector fields subject to the kinematic and Navier boundary conditions. Then we develop a spectral theory of the Stokes operator acting on divergence-free vector fields on a domain with the kinematic and Navier boundary conditions. Finally, we employ the spectral theory and the necessary estimates to construct the Galerkin approximate solutions and establish their convergence to global weak solutions, as well as local strong solutions, of the initial-boundary problem. Furthermore, we show as a corollary that, when the slip length tends to zero, the weak solutions constructed converge to a solution to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations subject to the no-slip boundary condition for almost all time. The inviscid limit of the strong solutions to the unique solutions of the initial-boundary value problem with the slip boundary condition for the Euler equations is also established.
  • We study the uniqueness of solutions with a transonic shock in a duct in a class of transonic shock solutions, which are not necessarily small perturbations of the background solution, for steady potential flow. We prove that, for given uniform supersonic upstream flow in a straight duct, there exists a unique uniform pressure at the exit of the duct such that a transonic shock solution exists in the duct, which is unique modulo translation. For any other given uniform pressure at the exit, there exists no transonic shock solution in the duct. This is equivalent to establishing a uniqueness theorem for a free boundary problem of a partial differential equation of second order in a bounded or unbounded duct. The proof is based on the maximum/comparison principle and a judicious choice of special transonic shock solutions as a comparison solution.
  • We are interested in the large-time behavior of periodic entropy solutions in $L^\infty$ to anisotropic degenerate parabolic-hyperbolic equations of second-order. Unlike the pure hyperbolic case, the nonlinear equation is no longer self-similar invariant and the diffusion term in the equation significantly affects the large-time behavior of solutions; thus the approach developed earlier based on the self-similar scaling does not directly apply. In this paper, we develop another approach for establishing the decay of periodic solutions for anisotropic degenerate parabolic-hyperbolic equations. The proof is based on the kinetic formulation of entropy solutions. It involves time translations and a monotonicity-in-time property of entropy solutions, and employs the advantages of the precise kinetic equation for the solutions in order to recognize the role of nonlinearity-diffusivity of the equation.
  • A fundamental problem in differential geometry is to characterize intrinsic metrics on a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold ${\mathcal M}^2$ which can be realized as isometric immersions into $\R^3$. This problem can be formulated as initial and/or boundary value problems for a system of nonlinear partial differential equations of mixed elliptic-hyperbolic type whose mathematical theory is largely incomplete. In this paper, we develop a general approach, which combines a fluid dynamic formulation of balance laws for the Gauss-Codazzi system with a compensated compactness framework, to deal with the initial and/or boundary value problems for isometric immersions in $\R^3$. The compensated compactness framework formed here is a natural formulation to ensure the weak continuity of the Gauss-Codazzi system for approximate solutions, which yields the isometric realization of two-dimensional surfaces in $\R^3$. As a first application of this approach, we study the isometric immersion problem for two-dimensional Riemannian manifolds with strictly negative Gauss curvature. We prove that there exists a $C^{1,1}$ isometric immersion of the two-dimensional manifold in $\R^3$ satisfying our prescribed initial conditions. T
  • The shock reflection problem is one of the most important problems in mathematical fluid dynamics, since this problem not only arises in many important physical situations but also is fundamental for the theory of multidimensional conservation laws. However, most of the fundamental issues for shock reflection have not been understood. Therefore, it is important to establish the regularity of solutions to shock reflection in order to understand fully the phenomena of shock reflection. On the other hand, for a regular reflection configuration, the potential flow governs the exact behavior of the solution in $C^{1,1}$ across the pseudo-sonic circle even starting from the full Euler flow, that is, both of the nonlinear systems are actually the same in an physically significant region near the pseudo-sonic circle; thus, it becomes essential to understand the optimal regularity of solutions for the potential flow across the pseudo-sonic circle and at the point where the pseudo-sonic circle meets the reflected shock. In this paper, we study the regularity of solutions to regular shock reflection for potential flow. In particular, we prove that the $C^{1,1}$-regularity is optimal for the solution across the pseudo-sonic circle and at the point where the pseudo-sonic circle meets the reflected shock. We also obtain the $C^{2,\alpha}$ regularity of the solution up to the pseudo-sonic circle in the pseudo-subsonic region. The problem involves two types of transonic flow: one is a continuous transition through the pseudo-sonic circle from the pseudo-supersonic region to the pseudo-subsonic region; the other a jump transition through the transonic shock as a free boundary from another pseudo-supersonic region to the pseudo-subsonic region.
  • For an upstream supersonic flow past a straight-sided cone in $\R^3$ whose vertex angle is less than the critical angle, a transonic (supersonic-subsonic) shock-front attached to the cone vertex can be formed in the flow. In this paper we analyze the stability of transonic shock-fronts in three-dimensional steady potential flow past a perturbed cone. We establish that the self-similar transonic shock-front solution is conditionally stable in structure with respect to the conical perturbation of the cone boundary and the upstream flow in appropriate function spaces. In particular, it is proved that the slope of the shock-front tends asymptotically to the slope of the unperturbed self-similar shock-front downstream at infinity.