• We report on the properties of the low-mass stars that recently formed in the central ~ 2.7'x2.7' of 30 Dor including the R136 cluster. Using the photometric catalogue of De Marchi et al. (2011c), based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the most recent extinction law for this field, we identify 1035 bona-fide pre-main sequence (PMS) stars showing Halpha excess emission at the 4 sigma level with Halpha equivalent width of 20 AA or more. We find a wide spread in age spanning the range ~ 0.1-50 Myr. We also find that the older PMS objects are placed in front of the R136 cluster and are separated from it by a conspicuous amount of absorbing material, indicating that star formation has proceeded from the periphery into the interior of the region. We derive physical parameters for all PMS stars, including masses m, ages t, and mass accretion rates M_acc. To identify reliable correlations between these parameters, which are intertwined, we use a multivariate linear regression fit of the type log M_acc = a log t + b log m + c. The values of a and b for 30 Dor are compatible with those found in NGC 346 and NGC 602. We extend the fit to a uniform sample of 1307 PMS stars with 0.5 < m/Msun < 1.5 and t < 16 Myr in six star forming regions in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and Milky Way with metallicities in the range 0.1-1.0 Zsun. We find a=-0.59+/-0.02 and b=0.78+/-0.08. The residuals are systematically different between the six regions and reveal a strong correlation with metallicity Z, of the type c = (-3.69+/-0.02) - (0.30+/-0.04) log Z/Zsun. A possible interpretation of this trend is that when the metallicity is higher so is the radiation pressure and this limits the accretion process, both in its rate and duration.
  • ESASky is a science-driven discovery portal to explore the multi-wavelength sky and visualise and access multiple astronomical archive holdings. The tool is a web application that requires no prior knowledge of any of the missions involved and gives users world-wide simplified access to the highest-level science data products from multiple astronomical space-based astronomy missions plus a number of ESA source catalogues. The first public release of ESASky features interfaces for the visualisation of the sky in multiple wavelengths, the visualisation of query results summaries, and the visualisation of observations and catalogue sources for single and multiple targets. This paper describes these features within ESASky, developed to address use cases from the scientific community. The decisions regarding the visualisation of large amounts of data and the technologies used were made in order to maximise the responsiveness of the application and to keep the tool as useful and intuitive as possible.
  • We present $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ molecular gas data observed by ALMA, massive early stage young stellar objects identified by applying color-magnitude cuts to \textit{Spitzer} and \textit{Herschel} photometry, and low-mass late stage young stellar objects identified via H$\mathrm{\alpha}$ excess. Using dendrograms, we derive properties for the molecular cloud structures. This is the first time a dendrogram analysis has been applied to extragalactic clouds. The majority of clumps have a virial parameter equal to unity or less. The size-linewidth relations of $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$ and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$ show the clumps in this study have a larger linewidth for a given size (by factor of 3.8 and 2.5, respectively) in comparison to several, but not all, previous studies. The larger linewidths in 30 Doradus compared to typical Milky Way quiescent clumps are probably due to the highly energetic environmental conditions of 30 Doradus. The slope of the size-linewidth relations of $\mathrm{^{12}CO}$, 0.65 $\pm$ 0.04, and $\mathrm{^{13}CO}$, 0.97 $\pm$ 0.12, are on the higher end but consistent within 3$\mathrm{\sigma}$ of previous studies. Massive star formation occurs in clumps with high masses ($> 1.83 \times 10^{2}\;\mathrm{M_{\odot}}$), high linewidths (v $> 1.18\;\mathrm{km/s}$), and high mass densities ($> 6.67 \times 10^{2}\;\mathrm{M_{\odot}\;pc^{-2}}$). The majority of embedded, massive young stellar objects are associated with a clump. However the majority of more evolved, low-mass young stellar objects are not associated with a clump.
  • Context: The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject (MOS), long-slit, and integral field (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of $\sim$9 $\mathrm{arcmin}^2$. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main optical planes of the instrument. Results: The NIRSpec parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with high fidelity. The intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, RMS) of the model, as measured from the extracted calibration spectra, is better than 1/10 of a pixel along the spatial direction and better than 1/20 of a resolution element in the spectral direction for all of the grating-based spectral modes. This is fully consistent with the corresponding allocation in the spatial and spectral calibration budgets of NIRSpec.
  • We report on the study of interstellar extinction across the Tarantula nebula (30 Doradus), in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using observations from the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project in the 0.3 - 1.6 micron range. The considerable and patchy extinction inside the nebula causes about 3500 red clump stars to be scattered along the reddening vector in the colour-magnitude diagrams, thereby allowing an accurate determination of the reddening slope in all bands. The measured slope of the reddening vector is remarkably steeper in all bands than in the the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. At optical wavelengths, the larger ratio of total-to-selective extinction, namely Rv = 4.5 +/- 0.2, implies the presence of a grey component in the extinction law, due to a larger fraction of large grains. The extra large grains are most likely ices from supernova ejecta and will significantly alter the extinction properties of the region until they sublimate in 50 - 100 Myr. We discuss the implications of this extinction law for the Tarantula nebula and in general for regions of massive star formation in galaxies. Our results suggest that fluxes of strongly star forming regions are likely to be underestimated by a factor of about 2 in the optical.
  • We present a science-driven discovery portal for all the ESA Astronomy Missions called ESA Sky that allow users to explore the multi-wavelength sky and to seamlessly retrieve science-ready data in all ESA Astronomy mission archives from a web application without prior-knowledge of any of the missions. The first public beta of the service has been released, currently featuring an interface for exploration of the multi-wavelength sky and for single and/or multiple target searches of science-ready imaging data and catalogues. Future releases will enable retrieval of spectra and will have special time-domain exploration features. From a technical point of view, the system offers progressive multi-resolution all-sky projections of full mission datasets using a new generation of HEALPix projections called HiPS, developed at the CDS; detailed geometrical footprints to connect the all-sky mosaics to individual observations; and direct access to science-ready data at the underlying mission-specific science archives.
  • Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, with considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars, from basic luminosities and effective temperatures to masses and ages, we must understand and measure the local extinction law. This problem affects all the massive young clusters discussed in his volume. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law in an uniform way across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC). In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin^2, we can easily derive a solid and self-consistent absolute extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. Here, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project.
  • We have undertaken a systematic study of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars spanning a wide range of masses (0.5 - 4 Msolar), metallicities (0.1 - 1 Zsolar) and ages (0.5 - 30 Myr). We have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to identify and characterise a large sample of PMS objects in several star-forming regions in the Magellanic Clouds, namely 30 Dor and the SN 1987A field in the LMC, and NGC 346 and NGC 602 in the SMC, and have compared them to PMS stars in similar regions in the Milky Way, such as NGC 3603 and Trumpler 14, which we studied with the HST and Very Large Telescope (VLT). We have developed a novel method that combines broad-band (V, I) photometry with narrow-band Halpha imaging to determine the physical parameters (temperature, luminosity, age, mass and mass accretion rate) of more than 3000 bona-fide PMS stars still undergoing active mass accretion. This is presently the largest and most homogeneous sample of PMS objects with known physical properties and includes not only very young objects, but also PMS stars older than 10 - 20 Myr that are approaching the main sequence (MS). We find that the mass accretion rate scales roughly with the square root of the age, with the mass of the star to the power of 1.5, and with the inverse of the cube root of the metallicity. The mass accretion rates for stars of the same mass and age are thus systematically higher in the Magellanic Clouds than in the Milky Way. These results are bound to have important implications for, and constraints on our understanding of the star formation process.
  • In this paper, we discuss the origin of the observed correlation between cluster concentration c and present-day mass function (PDMF) slope {\alpha} reported by De Marchi, Paresce & Pulone. This relation can either be reproduced from universal initial conditions combined with some dynamical mechanism(s) that alter(s) the cluster structure and mass function over time, or it must arise early on in the cluster lifetime, such as during the gas-embedded phase of cluster formation. Using a combination of Monte Carlo and N-body models for globular cluster evolution performed with the MOCCA and NBODY6 codes, respectively, we explore a number of dynamical mechanisms that could affect the observed relation. For the range of initial conditions considered here, our results are consistent with an universal initial binary fraction \approx 10% (which does not, however, preclude 100%) and an universal initial stellar mass function resembling the standard Kroupa distribution. Most of the dispersion observed in the c-{\alpha} relation can be attributed to two-body relaxation and Galactic tides. However, dynamical processes alone could not have reproduced the dispersion in concentration, and we require at least some correlation between the initial concentration and the total cluster mass. We argue that the origin of this trend could be connected to the gas-embedded phase of cluster evolution.
  • We have studied the interstellar extinction in a field of ~3' x 3' at the core of the 30 Doradus nebula, including the central R136 cluster, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Observations at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, obtained with the WFC3 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope, show that the stars belonging to the red giant clump are spread across the colour-magnitude diagrams because of the considerable and uneven levels of extinction in this region. Since these stars share very similar physical properties and are all at the same distance, they allow us to derive the absolute extinction in a straightforward and reliable way. Thus we have measured the extinction towards about 180 objects and the extinction law in the range 0.3 - 1.6 micron. At optical wavelengths, the extinction curve is almost parallel to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium. Taking the latter as a template, the value of Rv = 4.5 +/- 0.2 that we measure indicates that in the optical there is an extra grey component due to a larger fraction of large grains. At wavelengths longer than ~1 micron, the contribution of this additional component tapers off as lambda^-1.5, like in the Milky Way, suggesting that the nature of the grains is otherwise similar to those in our Galaxy, but with a ~2.2 times higher fraction of large grains. These results are consistent with the addition of "fresh" large grains by supernova explosions, as recently revealed by Herschel and ALMA observations of SN 1987A.
  • We have studied the interstellar extinction in a field of 3' x 3' located about 6' SW of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Hubble Space Telescope observations in the U, B, V, I and Halpha bands reveal patchy extinction in this field. The colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) shows an elongated stellar sequence, almost parallel to the main sequence (MS), which is in reality made up of stars of the red giant clump (RC) spread across the CMD by the uneven levels of extinction in this region. Since these objects are all at the same distance from us and share very similar physical properties, we can derive quantitatively both the extinction law in the range 3000 - 8000 Angstrom and the absolute extinction towards about 100 objects, setting statistically significant constraints on the dust grains properties in this area. We find an extinction curve considerably flatter than the standard Galactic one and than those obtained before for the LMC. The derived value of Rv = 5.6 +/- 0.3 implies that in this region larger grains dominate. Upper MS stars span a narrower range of E(B-V) values than RC objects, at variance with what has been found elsewhere in the LMC.
  • We have studied the young stellar populations in NGC 602, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using a novel method that we have developed to combine Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the V, I, and Halpha bands. We have identified about 300 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, all of which are still undergoing active mass accretion, and have determined their physical parameters (effective temperature, luminosity, age, mass and mass accretion rate). Our analysis shows that star formation has been present in this field over the last 60 Myr. In addition, we can recognise at least two clear, distinct, and prominent episodes in the recent past: one about 2 Myr ago, but still ongoing in regions of higher nebulosity, and one (or more) older than 30 Myr, encompassing both stars dispersed in the field and two smaller clusters located about 100 arcsec north of the centre of NGC 602. The relative locations of younger and older PMS stars do not imply a causal effect or triggering of one generation on the other. The strength of the two episodes appears to be comparable, but the episode occurring more than 30 Myr ago might have been even stronger than the current one. We have investigated the evolution of the mass accretion rate M_acc as a function of the stellar parameters finding that log M_acc ~ -0.6 log t + log m + c, where t is the age of the star, m its mass and c is a decreasing function of the metallicity.
  • Attention is given to a population of 110 stars in the NGC 6611 cluster of the Eagle Nebula that have prominent near-infrared (NIR) excess and optical colours typical of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars older than 8 Myr. At least half of those for which spectroscopy exists have a Halpha emission line profile revealing active accretion. In principle, the V-I colours of all these stars would be consistent with those of young PMS objects (< 1 Myr) whose radiation is heavily obscured by a circumstellar disc seen at high inclination and in small part scattered towards the observer by the back side of the disc. However, using theoretical models it is shown here that objects of this type can only account for a few percent of this population. In fact, the spatial distribution of these objects, their X-ray luminosities, their optical brightness, their positions in the colour-magnitude diagram and the weak Li absorption lines of the stars studied spectroscopically suggest that most of them are at least 8 times older than the ~1 Myr-old PMS stars already known in this cluster and could be as old as ~30 Myr. This is the largest homogeneous sample to date of Galactic PMS stars considerably older than 8 Myr that are still actively accreting from a circumstellar disc and it allows us to set a lower limit of 7% to the disc frequency at ~16 Myr in NGC 6611. These values imply a characteristic exponential lifetime of ~6 Myr for disc dissipation.
  • We have used new, deep, visible and near infrared observations of the compact starburst cluster in the giant HII region NGC 3603 and its surroundings with the WFC3 on HST and HAWK-I on the VLT to study in detail the physical properties of its intermediate mass (~ 1 - 3 M_sun) stellar population. We show that after correction for differential extinction and actively accreting stars, and the study of field star contamination, strong evidence remains for a continuous spread in the ages of pre-main sequence stars in the range ~ 2 to ~ 30 Myr within the temporal resolution available. Existing differences among presently available theoretical models account for the largest possible variation in shape of the measured age histograms within these limits. We also find that this isochronal age spread in the near infrared and visible Colour-Magnitude Diagrams cannot be reproduced by any other presently known source of astrophysical or instrumental scatter that could mimic the luminosity spread seen in our observations except, possibly, episodic accretion. The measured age spread and the stellar spatial distribution in the cluster are consistent with the hypothesis that star formation started at least 20-30 Myrs ago progressing slowly but continuously up to at least a few million years ago. All the stars in the considered mass range are distributed in a flattened oblate spheroidal pattern with the major axis oriented in an approximate South-East - North-West direction, and with the length of the equatorial axis decreasing with increasing age. This asymmetry is most likely due to the fact that star formation occurred along a filament of gas and dust in the natal molecular cloud oriented locally in this direction.
  • We present a new technique to quantify cluster-to-cluster variations in the observed present-day stellar mass functions of a large sample of star clusters. Our method quantifies these differences as a function of both the stellar mass and the total cluster mass, and offers the advantage that it is insensitive to the precise functional form of the mass function. We applied our technique to data taken from the ACS Survey for Globular Clusters, from which we obtained completeness-corrected stellar mass functions in the mass range 0.25-0.75 M$_{\odot}$ for a sample of 27 clusters. The results of our observational analysis were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations for globular cluster evolution spanning a range of initial mass functions, total numbers of stars, concentrations, and virial radii. We show that the present-day mass functions of the clusters in our sample can be reproduced by assuming an universal initial mass function for all clusters, and that the cluster-to-cluster differences are consistent with what is expected from two-body relaxation. A more complete exploration of the initial cluster conditions will be needed in future studies to better constrain the precise functional form of the initial mass function. This study is a first step toward using our technique to constrain the dynamical histories of a large sample of old Galactic star clusters and, by extension, star formation in the early Universe.
  • We used deep wide-field observations obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to study the blue straggler star (BSS) population in the innermost five arcminutes of the remote Galactic globular cluster Palomar 14. The BSS radial distribution is found to be consistent with that of the normal cluster stars, showing no evidence of central segregation. Palomar 14 is the third system in the Galaxy (in addition to OmegaCentauri and NGC 2419) showing a population of BSS not centrally segregated. This is the most direct evidence that in Palomar 14 two-body relaxation has not fully established energy equipartition yet, even in the central regions (in agreement with the estimated half-mass relaxation time, which is significantly larger than the cluster age). These observational facts have important implications for the interpretation of the shape of the mass function and the existence of the tidal tails recently discovered in this cluster.
  • We have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the field of the NGC 346 cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the results of a novel self-consistent method that provides a reliable identification of pre-main sequence (PMS) objects actively undergoing mass accretion, regardless of their age. The 680 identified bona-fide PMS stars show a bimodal age distribution, with two roughly equally numerous populations peaked respectively at ~1 Myr, and ~20 Myr. We use the age and other physical properties of these PMS stars to study how star formation has proceeded across time and space in NGC 346. We find no correlation between the locations of young and old PMS stars, nor do we find a correspondence between the positions of young PMS stars and those of massive OB stars of similar age. Furthermore, the mass distribution of stars with similar age shows large variations throughout the region. We conclude that, while on a global scale it makes sense to talk about an initial mass function, this concept is not meaningful for individual star-forming regions. An interesting implication of the separation between regions where massive stars and low-mass objects appear to form is that high-mass stars might not be "perfect" indicators of star formation and hence a large number of low-mass stars formed elsewhere might have so far remained unnoticed. For certain low surface density galaxies this way of preferential low-mass star formation may be the predominant mechanism, with the consequence that their total mass as derived from the luminosity may be severely underestimated and that their evolution is not correctly understood.
  • Using observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using young massive main sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (> 4 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one third of these objects are younger than ~4Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionising cluster R136, whereas the rest have ages up to ~30Myr, with a median age of ~12Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very centre of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photoevaporation of the older circumstellar discs caused by the massive ionising members of R136.
  • We present our investigation of pre--main-sequence (PMS) stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from imaging with Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 camera. Our targets of interest are four star-forming regions located at the periphery of the super-giant shell LMC 4 (Shapley Constellation III). The PMS stellar content of the regions is revealed through the differential Hess diagrams and the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Further statistical analysis of stellar distributions along cross-sections of the faint part of the CMDs allowed the quantitative assessment of the PMS stars census, and the isolation of faint PMS stars as the true low-mass stellar members of the regions. These distributions are found to be well represented by a double Gaussian function, the first component of which represents the main-sequence field stars and the second the native PMS stars of each region. Based on this result, a cluster membership probability was assigned to each PMS star according to its CMD position. The higher extinction in the region LH 88 did not allow the unambiguous identification of its native stellar population. The CMD distributions of the PMS stars with the highest membership probability in the regions LH 60, LH 63 and LH 72 exhibit an extraordinary similarity among the regions, suggesting that these stars share common characteristics, as well as common recent star formation history. Considering that the regions are located at different areas of the edge of LMC 4, this finding suggests that star formation along the super-giant shell may have occurred almost simultaneously.
  • [Abridged] We have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the field of the NGC346 cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using a novel self-consistent method that allows us to reliably identify pre-main sequence (PMS) objects actively undergoing mass accretion, regardless of their age. The method does not require spectroscopy and combines broad-band V and I photometry with narrow-band Halpha imaging to identify all stars with excess Halpha emission and derive the accretion luminosity Lacc and mass accretion rate Macc for all of them. The application of this method to existing HST/ACS photometry of the NGC346 field has allowed us to identify and study 680 bona-fide PMS stars with masses from ~0.4 to ~4 Msolar and ages in the range from ~1 to ~30 Myr. This is the first study to reveal that, besides a young population of PMS stars (~ 1 Myr old), in this field there is also an older population of PMS objects with a median age of ~20 Myr. We provide for all of them accurate physical parameters. We study the evolution of the mass accretion rate as a function of stellar parameters and find that logMacc ~ -0.6 Log t + Log m + c, where t is the age of the star, m its mass and c a quantity that is higher at lower metallicity. The high mass accretion rates that we find suggest that a considerable fraction of the stellar mass is accreted during the PMS phase and that PMS evolutionary models that do not account for this effect will systematically underestimate the true age when compared with the observations.
  • We use near-infrared data obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope to identify objects having the colors of brown dwarfs (BDs) in the field of the massive galactic cluster NGC 3603. These are identified through use of a combination of narrow and medium band filters spanning the J and H bands, and which are particularly sensitive to the presence of the 1.3-1.5{\mu}m H2O molecular band - unique to BDs. We provide a calibration of the relationship between effective temperature and color for both field stars and for BDs. This photometric method provides effective temperatures for BDs to an accuracy of {\pm}350K relative to spectroscopic techniques. This accuracy is shown to be not significantly affected by either stellar surface gravity or uncertainties in the interstellar extinction. We identify nine objects having effective temperature between 1700 and 2200 K, typical of BDs, observed J-band magnitudes in the range 19.5-21.5, and that are strongly clustered towards the luminous core of NGC 3603. However, if these are located at the distance of the cluster, they are far too luminous to be normal BDs. We argue that it is unlikely that these objects are either artifacts of our dataset, normal field BDs/M-type giants or extra-galactic contaminants and, therefore, might represent a new class of stars having the effective temperatures of BDs but with luminosities of more massive stars. We explore the interesting scenario in which these objects would be normal stars that have recently tidally ingested a Hot Jupiter, the remnants of which are providing a short-lived extended photosphere to the central star. In this case, we would expect them to show the signature of fast rotation.
  • Early release science observations of the cluster NGC3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished HST allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with Halpha excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with Halpha excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.
  • We show that we can obtain a good fit to the present day stellar mass functions (MFs) of a large sample of young and old Galactic clusters in the range 0.1 - 10 Msolar with a tapered power law distribution function with an exponential truncation of the form dN/dm \propto m^alpha [1 - exp-(m/m_c)^beta]. The average value of the power-law index alpha is -2, that of beta is 2.5, whereas the characteristic mass m_c is in the range 0.1 - 0.8 Msolar and does not seem to vary in any systematic way with the present cluster parameters such as metal abundance, total cluster mass or central concentration. However, m_c shows a remarkable correlation with the dynamical age of the cluster, namely m_c/Msolar ~ 0.15 + 0.5 tau_dyn^0.75, where tau_dyn is the dynamical age taken as the ratio of cluster age and dissolution time. The small scatter seen around this correlation is consistent with the uncertainties on the estimated value of tau_dyn. We attribute the observed trend to the onset of mass segregation via two-body relaxation in a tidal environment, causing the preferential loss of low-mass stars from the cluster and hence a drift of the characteristic mass m_c towards higher values. If dynamical evolution is indeed at the origin of the observed trend, it would seem plausible that high-concentration globular clusters, now with median m_c ~ 0.33 Msolar, were born with a stellar MF very similar to that measured today in the youngest Galactic clusters and with a value of m_c ~ 0.15 Msolar. This hypothesis is consistent with the absence of a turn-over in the MF of the Galactic bulge down to the observational limit at ~0.2 Msolar and, if correct, it would carry the implication that the characteristic mass is not set by the thermal Jeans mass of the cloud.
  • We have developed and successfully tested a new self-consistent method to reliably identify pre-main sequence (PMS) objects actively undergoing mass accretion in a resolved stellar population, regardless of their age. The method does not require spectroscopy and combines broad-band V and I photometry with narrow-band Halpha imaging to: (1) identify all stars with excess Halpha emission; (2) derive their Halpha luminosity L(Halpha); (3) estimate the Halpha emission equivalent width; (4) derive the accretion luminosity L_acc from L(Halpha); and finally (5) obtain the mass accretion rate M_acc from L_acc and the stellar parameters (mass and radius). By selecting stars with photometric accuracy in Halpha better than 15%, the statistical uncertainty on the derived M_acc is typically <17% and is dictated by the precision of the Halpha photometry. Systematic uncertainties, of up to a factor of 3 on the value of M_acc, are caused by our incomplete understanding of the physics of the accretion process and affect all determinations of the mass accretion rate, including those based on a spectroscopic Halpha line analysis. As an application of our method, we study a field of 9.16 arcmin2 around SN1987A, using existing HST photometry. We identify as bona-fide PMS stars a total of 133 objects with a Halpha excess above the 4 sigma level and a median age of 13.5 Myr. Their median mass accretion rate of 2.6x10-8 Msolar/yr is in excellent agreement with previous determinations based on the U-band excess of the stars in this field, and with the value measured for G-type PMS stars in the Milky Way. Their L_acc shows a strong dependence on their distance from a group of hot massive stars in the field and suggests that the UV radiation of the latter is rapidly eroding the circumstellar discs around PMS stars.
  • We have studied the dissolution of initially mass segregated and unsegregated star clusters due to two-body relaxation in external tidal fields, using Aarseth's collisional N-body code NBODY4 on GRAPE6 special-purpose computers. When extrapolating results of initially not mass segregated models to globular clusters, we obtain a correlation between the time until destruction and the slope of the mass function, in the sense that globular clusters which are closer to dissolution are more strongly depleted in low-mass stars. This correlation fits observed mass functions of most globular clusters. The mass functions of several globular clusters are however more strongly depleted in low-mass stars than suggested by these models. Such strongly depleted mass functions can be explained if globular clusters started initially mass segregated. Primordial mass segregation also explains the correlation between the slope of the stellar mass function and the cluster concentration which was recently discovered by De Marchi et al. (2007). In this case, it is possible that all globular clusters started with a mass function similar to that seen in young open clusters in the present-day universe, at least for stars below m=0.8 Msun. This argues for a near universality of the mass function for different star formation environments and metallicities in the range -2 < [Fe/H] < 0. We finally describe a novel algorithm which can initialise stationary mass segregated clusters with arbitrary density profile and amount of mass segregation.