• Networks of spiking neurons (SNNs) are frequently studied as models for networks of neurons in the brain, but also as paradigm for novel energy efficient computing hardware. In principle they are especially suitable for computations in the temporal domain, such as speech processing, because their computations are carried out via events in time and space. But so far they have been lacking the capability to preserve information for longer time spans during a computation, until it is updated or needed - like a register of a digital computer. This function is provided to artificial neural networks through Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) units. We show here that SNNs attain similar capabilities if one includes adapting neurons in the network. Adaptation denotes an increase of the firing threshold of a neuron after preceding firing. A substantial fraction of neurons in the neocortex of rodents and humans has been found to be adapting. It turns out that if adapting neurons are integrated in a suitable manner into the architecture of SNNs, the performance of these enhanced SNNs, which we call LSNNs, for computation in the temporal domain approaches that of artificial neural networks with LSTM-units. In addition, the computing and learning capabilities of LSNNs can be substantially enhanced through learning-to-learn (L2L) methods from machine learning, that have so far been applied primarily to LSTM networks and apparently never to SSNs. This preliminary report on arXiv will be replaced by a more detailed version in about a month.
  • Neuromorphic hardware tends to pose limits on the connectivity of deep networks that one can run on them. But also generic hardware and software implementations of deep learning run more efficiently for sparse networks. Several methods exist for pruning connections of a neural network after it was trained without connectivity constraints. We present an algorithm, DEEP R, that enables us to train directly a sparsely connected neural network. DEEP R automatically rewires the network during supervised training so that connections are there where they are most needed for the task, while its total number is all the time strictly bounded. We demonstrate that DEEP R can be used to train very sparse feedforward and recurrent neural networks on standard benchmark tasks with just a minor loss in performance. DEEP R is based on a rigorous theoretical foundation that views rewiring as stochastic sampling of network configurations from a posterior.
  • Despite being originally inspired by the central nervous system, artificial neural networks have diverged from their biological archetypes as they have been remodeled to fit particular tasks. In this paper, we review several possibilites to reverse map these architectures to biologically more realistic spiking networks with the aim of emulating them on fast, low-power neuromorphic hardware. Since many of these devices employ analog components, which cannot be perfectly controlled, finding ways to compensate for the resulting effects represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss three different strategies to address this problem: the addition of auxiliary network components for stabilizing activity, the utilization of inherently robust architectures and a training method for hardware-emulated networks that functions without perfect knowledge of the system's dynamics and parameters. For all three scenarios, we corroborate our theoretical considerations with experimental results on accelerated analog neuromorphic platforms.
  • Emulating spiking neural networks on analog neuromorphic hardware offers several advantages over simulating them on conventional computers, particularly in terms of speed and energy consumption. However, this usually comes at the cost of reduced control over the dynamics of the emulated networks. In this paper, we demonstrate how iterative training of a hardware-emulated network can compensate for anomalies induced by the analog substrate. We first convert a deep neural network trained in software to a spiking network on the BrainScaleS wafer-scale neuromorphic system, thereby enabling an acceleration factor of 10 000 compared to the biological time domain. This mapping is followed by the in-the-loop training, where in each training step, the network activity is first recorded in hardware and then used to compute the parameter updates in software via backpropagation. An essential finding is that the parameter updates do not have to be precise, but only need to approximately follow the correct gradient, which simplifies the computation of updates. Using this approach, after only several tens of iterations, the spiking network shows an accuracy close to the ideal software-emulated prototype. The presented techniques show that deep spiking networks emulated on analog neuromorphic devices can attain good computational performance despite the inherent variations of the analog substrate.