• Experiments show that spike-triggered stimulation performed with Bidirectional Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BBCI) can artificially strengthen connections between separate neural sites in motor cortex (MC). What are the neuronal mechanisms responsible for these changes and how does targeted stimulation by a BBCI shape population-level synaptic connectivity? The present work describes a recurrent neural network model with probabilistic spiking mechanisms and plastic synapses capable of capturing both neural and synaptic activity statistics relevant to BBCI conditioning protocols. When spikes from a neuron recorded at one MC site trigger stimuli at a second target site after a fixed delay, the connections between sites are strengthened for spike-stimulus delays consistent with experimentally derived spike time dependent plasticity (STDP) rules. However, the relationship between STDP mechanisms at the level of networks, and their modification with neural implants remains poorly understood. Using our model, we successfully reproduces key experimental results and use analytical derivations, along with novel experimental data. We then derive optimal operational regimes for BBCIs, and formulate predictions concerning the efficacy of spike-triggered stimulation in different regimes of cortical activity.
  • Highly connected recurrent neural networks often produce chaotic dynamics, meaning their precise activity is sensitive to small perturbations. What are the consequences for how such networks encode streams of temporal stimuli? On the one hand, chaos is a strong source of randomness, suggesting that small changes in stimuli will be obscured by intrinsically generated variability. On the other hand, recent work shows that the type of chaos that occurs in spiking networks can have a surprisingly low-dimensional structure, suggesting that there may be "room" for fine stimulus features to be precisely resolved. Here we show that strongly chaotic networks produce patterned spikes that reliably encode time-dependent stimuli: using a decoder sensitive to spike times on timescales of 10's of ms, one can easily distinguish responses to very similar inputs. Moreover, recurrence serves to distribute signals throughout chaotic networks so that small groups of cells can encode substantial information about signals arriving elsewhere. A conclusion is that the presence of strong chaos in recurrent networks does not prohibit precise stimulus encoding.
  • This work is part of an effort to understand the neural basis for our visual system's ability, or failure, to accurately track moving visual signals. We consider here a ring model of spiking neurons, intended as a simplified computational model of a single hypercolumn of the primary visual cortex. Signals that consist of edges with time-varying orientations localized in space are considered. Our model is calibrated to produce spontaneous and driven firing rates roughly consistent with experiments, and our two main findings, for which we offer dynamical explanation on the level of neuronal interactions, are the following: (1) We have documented consistent transient overshoots in signal perception following signal switches due to emergent interactions of the E- and I-populations, and (2) for continuously moving signals, we have found that accuracy is considerably lower at reversals of orientation than when continuing in the same direction (as when the signal is a rotating bar). To measure performance, we use two metrics, called fidelity and reliability, to compare signals reconstructed by the system to the ones presented, and to assess trial-to-trial variability. We propose that the same population mechanisms responsible for orientation selectivity also impose constraints on dynamic signal tracking that manifest in perception failures consistent with psychophysical observations.
  • Large networks of sparsely coupled, excitatory and inhibitory cells occur throughout the brain. A striking feature of these networks is that they are chaotic. How does this chaos manifest in the neural code? Specifically, how variable are the spike patterns that such a network produces in response to an input signal? To answer this, we derive a bound for the entropy of multi-cell spike pattern distributions in large recurrent networks of spiking neurons responding to fluctuating inputs. The analysis is based on results from random dynamical systems theory and is complimented by detailed numerical simulations. We find that the spike pattern entropy is an order of magnitude lower than what would be extrapolated from single cells. This holds despite the fact that network coupling becomes vanishingly sparse as network size grows -- a phenomenon that depends on ``extensive chaos," as previously discovered for balanced networks without stimulus drive. Moreover, we show how spike pattern entropy is controlled by temporal features of the inputs. Our findings provide insight into how neural networks may encode stimuli in the presence of inherently chaotic dynamics.
  • Biological information processing is often carried out by complex networks of interconnected dynamical units. A basic question about such networks is that of reliability: if the same signal is presented many times with the network in different initial states, will the system entrain to the signal in a repeatable way? Reliability is of particular interest in neuroscience, where large, complex networks of excitatory and inhibitory cells are ubiquitous. These networks are known to autonomously produce strongly chaotic dynamics - an obvious threat to reliability. Here, we show that such chaos persists in the presence of weak and strong stimuli, but that even in the presence of chaos, intermittent periods of highly reliable spiking often coexist with unreliable activity. We elucidate the local dynamical mechanisms involved in this intermittent reliability, and investigate the relationship between this phenomenon and certain time-dependent attractors arising from the dynamics. A conclusion is that chaotic dynamics do not have to be an obstacle to precise spike responses, a fact with implications for signal coding in large networks.
  • What input signals will lead to synchrony vs. desynchrony in a group of biological oscillators? This question connects with both classical dynamical systems analyses of entrainment and phase locking and with emerging studies of stimulation patterns for controlling neural network activity. Here, we focus on the response of a population of uncoupled, elliptically bursting neurons to a common pulsatile input. We extend a phase reduction from the literature to capture inputs of varied strength, leading to a circle map with discontinuities of various orders. In a combined analytical and numerical approach, we apply our results to both a normal form model for elliptic bursting and to a biophysically-based neuron model from the basal ganglia. We find that, depending on the period and amplitude of inputs, the response can either appear chaotic (with provably positive Lyaponov exponent for the associated circle maps), or periodic with a broad range of phase-locked periods. Throughout, we discuss the critical underlying mechanisms, including slow-passage effects through Hopf bifurcation, the role and origin of discontinuities, and the impact of noise