• Type-I bursts (i.e. noise storms) are the earliest-known type of solar radio emission at the metre wavelength. They are believed to be excited by non-thermal energetic electrons accelerated in the corona. The underlying dynamic process and exact emission mechanism still remain unresolved. Here, with a combined analysis of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), radio and photospheric magnetic field data of unprecedented quality recorded during a type-I storm on 30 July 2011, we identify a good correlation between the radio bursts and the co-spatial EUV and magnetic activities. The EUV activities manifest themselves as three major brightening stripes above a region adjacent to a compact sunspot, while the magnetic field there presents multiple moving magnetic features (MMFs) with persistent coalescence or cancelation and a morphologically similar three-part distribution. We find that the type-I intensities are correlated with those of the EUV emissions at various wavelengths with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8. In addition, in the region between the brightening EUV stripes and the radio sources there appear consistent dynamic motions with a series of bi-directional flows, suggesting ongoing small-scale reconnection there. Mainly based on the induced connection between the magnetic motion at the photosphere and the EUV and radio activities in the corona, we suggest that the observed type-I noise storms and the EUV brightening activities are the consequence of small-scale magnetic reconnection driven by MMFs. This is in support of the original proposal made by Bentely et al. (Solar Phys. 193, 227, 2000).
  • In this paper, we present a study on persistent and gradual penumbral decay and correlated decline of the photospheric transverse field component during 10-20 hours before a major flare (X1.8) eruption on 2011 September 7. This long-term pre-eruption behavior is corroborated with the well-imaged pre-flare filament rising, the consistent expansion of coronal arcades overlying the filament, as well as the NLFFF modelling results in the literature. We suggest that both the long-term pre-flare penumbral decay and the transverse field decline are the photospheric manifestation of the gradual rise of the coronal filament-flux rope system. We also suggest that a C3 flare and subsequent reconnection process preceding the X1.8 flare play an important role in triggering the later major eruption.
  • We select 947 star-forming galaxies from SDSS-DR7 with [O~{\sc iii}]$\lambda$4363 emission lines detected at a signal-to-noise {ratio }larger than 5$\sigma$. Their electron temperatures and direct oxygen abundances are {then }determined. {W}e compare the results from different methods. $t_2${, the} electron temperature in {the }low ionization region{,} estimated from $t_3${, that} in {the }high ionization region{,} {is} compared {using} three analysis relations between $t_2-t_3${. These} show obvious differences, which result in some different ionic oxygen abundances. The results of $t_3$, $t_2$, {$\rm O^{++}$/$\rm H^+$} and {$\rm O^{+}$/$\rm H^+$} derived by using methods from IRAF and literature are also compared. The ionic abundances $\rm O^{++}$/$\rm H^+$ {are} higher than $\rm O^{+}$/$\rm H^+$ for most cases. The{ different} oxygen abundances derived from $T_{\rm e}$ and the strong-line ratios show {a }clear discrepancy, which is more obvious following increasing stellar mass and strong-line ratio $R_{23}$. The sample{ of} galaxies from SDSS {with} detected [O~{\sc iii}]$\lambda$4363 have lower metallicites and higher {star formation rates}, {so} they may not be typical representatives of the whole{ population of} galaxies. Adopting data objects from {Andrews \& Martini}, {Liang et al.} and {Lee et al.} data, we derive new relations of stellar mass and metallicity for star-forming galaxies in a much wider stellar mass range: from $10^6\,M_\odot$ to $10^{11}\,M_\odot$.
  • We present the observation of a major solar eruption that is associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA active region 11283. The filament and some overlying arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot. The sunspot rotated at $\sim$10$^\circ$ per hour rate during a period of 6 hours prior to the eruption. In this period, the filament was found to rise gradually along with the sunspot rotation. Based on the HMI observation, for an area along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, we found gradual pre-eruption decreases of both the mean strength of the photospheric horizontal field ($B_h$) and the mean inclination angle between the vector magnetic field and the local radial (or vertical) direction. These observations are consistent with the pre-eruption gradual rising of the filament-associated magnetic structure. In addition, according to the Non-Linear Force-Free-Field reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field, a pre-eruption magnetic flux rope structure is found to be in alignment with the filament, and a considerable amount of magnetic energy was transported to the corona during the period of sunspot rotation. Our study provides evidences that in this event sunspot rotation plays an important role in twisting, energizing, and destabilizing the coronal filament-flux rope system, and led to the eruption. We also propose that the pre-event evolution of $B_h$ may be used to discern the driving mechanism of eruptions.