• We present the first experimental confirmation of the quantum-mechanical prediction of stronger-than-binary correlations. These are correlations that cannot be explained under the assumption that the occurrence of a particular outcome of an $n \ge 3$-outcome measurement is due to a two-step process in which, in the first step, some classical mechanism precludes $n-2$ of the outcomes and, in the second step, a binary measurement generates the outcome. Our experiment uses pairs of photonic qutrits distributed between two laboratories, where randomly chosen three-outcome measurements are performed. We report a violation by {9.3} standard deviations of the optimal inequality for nonsignaling binary correlations.
  • Collective measurements on identically prepared quantum systems can extract more information than local measurements, thereby enhancing information-processing efficiency. Although this nonclassical phenomenon has been known for two decades, it has remained a challenging task to demonstrate the advantage of collective measurements in experiments. Here we introduce a general recipe for performing deterministic collective measurements on two identically prepared qubits based on quantum walks. Using photonic quantum walks, we realize experimentally an optimized collective measurement with fidelity 0.9946 without post selection. As an application, we achieve the highest tomographic efficiency in qubit state tomography to date. Our work offers an effective recipe for beating the precision limit of local measurements in quantum state tomography and metrology. In addition, our study opens an avenue for harvesting the power of collective measurements in quantum information processing and for exploring the intriguing physics behind this power.
  • Wave-particle duality is a typical example of Bohr's complementarity principle that plays a significant role in quantum mechanics. Previous studies used the visibility of an interference pattern to quantify the wave property and used path information to quantify the particle property. However, coherence is the core and basis of the interference phenomenon. If we could use coherence to characterize the wave property, the understanding of wave-particle duality would be strengthened. A recent theoretical work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 160406 (2016)] found two relations between quantum coherence and path information. Here, we demonstrate the new measure of wave-particle duality based on two kinds of coherence measures quantitatively for the first time. The wave property, quantified by the coherence in the l1-norm measure and the relative entropy measure, can be obtained via tomography of the target state, which is encoded in the path degree of freedom of the photons. The particle property, quantified by the path information, can be obtained via the discrimination of detector states, which is encoded in the polarization degree of freedom of the photons. Our work may deepen people's understanding of coherence and provide a new perspective regarding wave-particle duality.
  • Detecting a change point is a crucial task in statistics that has been recently extended to the quantum realm. A source state generator that emits a series of single photons in a default state suffers an alteration at some point and starts to emit photons in a mutated state. The problem consists in identifying the point where the change took place. In this work, we consider a learning agent that applies Bayesian inference on experimental data to solve this problem. This learning machine adjusts the measurement over each photon according to the past experimental results finds the change position in an online fashion. Our results show that the local-detection success probability can be largely improved by using such a machine learning technique. This protocol provides a tool for improvement in many applications where a sequence of identical quantum states is required.
  • Quantum resource theories seek to quantify sources of non-classicality that bestow quantum technologies their operational advantage. Chief among these are studies of quantum correlations and quantum coherence. The former to isolate non-classicality in the correlations between systems, the latter to capture non-classicality of quantum superpositions within a single physical system. Here we present a scheme that cyclically inter-converts between these resources without loss. The first stage converts coherence present in an input system into correlations with an ancilla. The second stage harnesses these correlations to restore coherence on the input system by measurement of the ancilla. We experimentally demonstrate this inter-conversion process using linear optics. Our experiment highlights the connection between non-classicality of correlations and non-classicality within local quantum systems, and provides potential flexibilities in exploiting one resource to perform tasks normally associated with the other.
  • The identification of an unknown quantum gate is a significant issue in quantum technology. In this paper, we propose a quantum gate identification method within the framework of quantum process tomography. In this method, a series of pure states are inputted to the gate and then a fast state tomography on the output states is performed and the data are used to reconstruct the quantum gate. Our algorithm has computational complexity $O(d^3)$ with the system dimension $d$. The algorithm is compared with maximum likelihood estimation method for the running time, which shows the efficiency advantage of our method. An error upper bound is established for the identification algorithm and the robustness of the algorithm against the purity of input states is also tested. We perform quantum optical experiment on single-qubit Hadamard gate to verify the effectiveness of the identification algorithm.
  • We experimentally demonstrate that tomographic measurements can be performed for states of qubits before they are prepared. A variant of the quantum teleportation protocol is used as a channel between two instants in time, allowing measurements for polarisation states of photons to be implemented 88 ns before they are created. Measurement data taken at the early time and later unscrambled according to the results of the protocol's Bell measurements, produces density matrices with an average fidelity of $0.90 \pm 0.01$ against the ideal states of photons created at the later time. Process tomography of the time-reverse quantum channel finds an average process fidelity of $0.84 \pm 0.02$. While our proof-of-principle implementation necessitates some post-selection, the general protocol is deterministic and requires no post-selection to sift desired states and reject a larger ensemble.
  • Quantum coherence, which quantifies the superposition properties of a quantum state, plays an indispensable role in quantum resource theory. A recent theoretical work [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{116}, 070402 (2016)] studied the manipulation of quantum coherence in bipartite or multipartite systems under the protocol Local Incoherent Operation and Classical Communication (LQICC). Here we present the first experimental realization of obtaining maximal coherence in assisted distillation protocol based on linear optical system. The results of our work show that the optimal distillable coherence rate can be reached even in one-copy scenario when the overall bipartite qubit state is pure. Moreover, the experiments for mixed states showed that distillable coherence can be increased with less demand than entanglement distillation. Our work might be helpful in the remote quantum information processing and quantum control.
  • Full quantum state tomography (FQST) plays a unique role in the estimation of the state of a quantum system without \emph{a priori} knowledge or assumptions. Unfortunately, since FQST requires informationally (over)complete measurements, both the number of measurement bases and the computational complexity of data processing suffer an exponential growth with the size of the quantum system. A 14-qubit entangled state has already been experimentally prepared in an ion trap, and the data processing capability for FQST of a 14-qubit state seems to be far away from practical applications. In this paper, the computational capability of FQST is pushed forward to reconstruct a 14-qubit state with a run time of only 3.35 hours using the linear regression estimation (LRE) algorithm, even when informationally overcomplete Pauli measurements are employed. The computational complexity of the LRE algorithm is first reduced from $O(10^{19})$ to $O(10^{15})$ for a 14-qubit state, by dropping all the zero elements, and its computational efficiency is further sped up by fully exploiting the parallelism of the LRE algorithm with parallel Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) programming. Our result can play an important role in quantum information technologies with large quantum systems.
  • The precision limit in quantum state tomography is of great interest not only to practical applications but also to foundational studies. However, little is known about this subject in the multiparameter setting even theoretically due to the subtle information tradeoff among incompatible observables. In the case of a qubit, the theoretic precision limit was determined by Hayashi as well as Gill and Massar, but attaining the precision limit in experiments has remained a challenging task. Here we report the first experiment which achieves this precision limit in adaptive quantum state tomography on optical polarization qubits. The two-step adaptive strategy employed in our experiment is very easy to implement in practice. Yet it is surprisingly powerful in optimizing most figures of merit of practical interest. Our study may have significant implications for multiparameter quantum estimation problems, such as quantum metrology. Meanwhile, it may promote our understanding about the complementarity principle and uncertainty relations from the information theoretic perspective.
  • The Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation is a cornerstone of quantum physics. It was recently shown to be not universally valid and two different approaches to reformulate it were proposed.The first one focuses on how error and disturbance of two observables, A and B, depend on a particular quantum state. The second one asks how a joint measurement of A and B affects their eigenstates. Previous experiments focused on the first approach. Here, we focus on the second one. Firstly, we propose and implement an extendible method for quantum walk-based joint measurements of noisy Pauli operators to test the error-disturbance relation for qubits. Then, we formulate and experimentally test a new universally valid relation for the three mutually unbiased observables. We therefore establish a fundamentally new method of testing error-disturbance relations.
  • Adaptive techniques have important potential for wide applications in enhancing precision of quantum parameter estimation. We present a recursively adaptive quantum state tomography (RAQST) protocol for finite dimensional quantum systems and experimentally implement the adaptive tomography protocol on two-qubit systems. In this RAQST protocol, an adaptive measurement strategy and a recursive linear regression estimation algorithm are performed. Numerical results show that our RAQST protocol can outperform the tomography protocols using mutually unbiased bases (MUB) and the two-stage MUB adaptive strategy even with the simplest product measurements. When nonlocal measurements are available, our RAQST can beat the Gill-Massar bound for a wide range of quantum states with a modest number of copies. We use only the simplest product measurements to implement two-qubit tomography experiments. In the experiments, we use error-compensation techniques to tackle systematic error due to misalignments and imperfection of wave plates, and achieve about 100-fold reduction of the systematic error. The experimental results demonstrate that the improvement of RAQST over nonadaptive tomography is significant for states with a high level of purity. Our results also show that this recursively adaptive tomography method is particularly effective for the reconstruction of maximally entangled states, which are important resources in quantum information.
  • Systematic errors are inevitable in most measurements performed in real life because of imperfect measurement devices. Reducing systematic errors is crucial to ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurement results. To this end, delicate error-compensation design is often necessary in addition to device calibration to reduce the dependence of the systematic error on the imperfection of the devices. The art of error-compensation design is well appreciated in nuclear magnetic resonance system by using composite pulses. In contrast, there are few works on reducing systematic errors in quantum optical systems. Here we propose an error-compensation design to reduce the systematic error in projective measurements on a polarization qubit. It can reduce the systematic error to the second order of the phase errors of both the half-wave plate (HWP) and the quarter-wave plate (QWP) as well as the angle error of the HWP. This technique is then applied to experiments on quantum state tomography on polarization qubits, leading to a 20-fold reduction in the systematic error. Our study may find applications in high-precision tasks in polarization optics and quantum optics.
  • We report an experimental implementation of a single-qubit generalised measurement scenario(POVM) based on a quantum walk model. The qubit is encoded in a single-photon polarisation. The photon performs a quantum walk on an array of optical elements, where the polarisation-dependent translation is performed via birefringent beam displacers and a change of the polarisation is implemented with the help of wave-plates. We implement: (i) Trine-POVM, i.e., the POVM elements uniformly distributed on an equatorial plane of the Bloch sphere; (ii) Symmetric-Informationally- Complete (SIC) POVM; and (iii) Unambiguous Discrimination of two non-orthogonal qubit states.
  • Constructing a quantum memory for a photonic entanglement is vital for realizing quantum communication and network. Besides enabling the realization of high channel capacity communication, entangled photons of high-dimensional space are of great interest because of many extended applications in quantum information and fundamental physics fields. Photons entangled in a two-dimensional space had been stored in different system, but there have been no any report on the storage of a photon pair entangled in a high-dimensional space. Here, we report the first experimental realization of storing an entangled orbital angular momentum (OAM) state through a far off-resonant two-photon transition (FORTPT) in a cold atomic ensemble. We reconstruct the matrix density of an OAM entangled state postselected in a two-dimensional subspace with a fidelity of 90.3%+/-0.8% and obtain the Clauser, Horne and Shimony and Holt inequality parameter S of 2.41+/-0.06 after a programmed storage time. All results clearly show the preservation of entanglement during the storage. Besides, we also realize the storage of a true-single-photon via FORTPT for the first time.
  • Successful implementation of several quantum information and communication protocols require distributing entangled pairs of quantum bits in reliable manner. While there exists a substantial amount of recent theoretical and experimental activities dealing with non-Markovian quantum dynamics, experimental application and verification of the usefulness of memory-effects for quantum information tasks is still missing. We combine these two aspects and show experimentally that a recently introduced concept of nonlocal memory effects allows to protect and distribute polarization entangled pairs of photons in efficient manner within polarization-maintaining (PM) optical fibers. The introduced scheme is based on correlating the environments, i.e. frequencies of the polarization entangled photons, before their physical distribution. When comparing to the case without nonlocal memory effects, we demonstrate at least 12-fold improvement in the channel, or fiber length, for preserving the highly-entangled initial polarization states of photons against dephasing.
  • The reversible transfer of the quantum information between a photon, an information carrier, and a quantum memory with high fidelity and reliability is the prerequisite for realizing a long-distance quantum communication and a quantum network. Encoding photons into higher-dimensional states could significantly increase their information-carrying capability and network capacity. Moreover, the large-alphabet quantum key distribution affords a more secure flux of information. Quantum memories have been realized in different physical systems, such as atomic ensembles and solid systems etc., but to date, all quantum memories only realize the storage and retrieval of the photons lived in a two-dimensional space spanned for example by orthogonal polarizations, therefore only a quantum bit could be stored there. Here, we report on the first experimental realization of a quantum memory storing a photon lived in a three-dimensional space spanned by orbital angular momentums via electromagnetically induced transparency in a cold atomic ensemble. We reconstruct the storage process density matrix with the fidelity of 85.3% by the aid of a 4-f imaging system experimentally. The ability to store a high-dimensional quantum state with high fidelity is very promising for building a high-dimensional quantum network.
  • It is widely accepted that the selection of measurement bases can affect the efficiency of quantum state estimation methods, precision of estimating an unknown state can be improved significantly by simply introduce a set of symmetrical measurement bases. Here we compare the efficiencies of estimations with different numbers of measurement bases by numerical simulation and experiment in optical system. The advantages of using a complete set of symmetrical measurement bases are illustrated more clearly.
  • We experimently demonstrate the interference of dephasing quantum channel using single photon Mach-Zender interferometer. We extract the information inaccessible to the technology of quantum tomography. Further, We introduce the application of our results in quantum key distribution.
  • Shared entanglement allows, under certain conditions, the remote implementation of quantum operations. We revise and extend recent theoretical results on the remote control of quantum systems as well as experimental results on the remote manipulation of photonic qubits via linear optical elements.
  • Quamtum remote rotation allows implement local quantum operation on remote systems with shared entanglement. Here we report an experimental demonstration of remote rotation on single photons using linear optical element. And the local dephase is also teleported during the process. The scheme can be generalized to any controlled rotation commutes with $\sigma_{z}$.
  • We present a practical and general scheme of remote preparation for pure and mixed state, in which an auxiliary qubit and controlled-NOT gate are used. We discuss the remote state preparation (RSP) in two important types of decoherent channel (depolarizing and dephaseing). In our experiment, we realize RSP in the dephaseing channel by using spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC), linear optical elements and single photon detector.
  • We propose a scheme for quantum teleportation of an atomic state based on the detection of cavity decay. The internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be disembodiedly transferred to another atom trapped in a distant cavity by measuring interference of polarized photons through single-photon detectors. In comparison with the original proposal by S. Bose, P.L. Knight, M.B. Plenio, and V. Vedral [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 5158 (1999)], our protocol of teleportation has a high fidelity of almost unity, and inherent robustness, such as the insensitivity of fidelity to randomness in the atom's position, and to detection inefficiency. All these favorable features make the scheme feasible with the current experimental technology.