• Entanglement polytopes result in finitely many types of entanglement that can be detected by only measuring single-particle spectra. With high probability, however, the local spectra lie in more than one polytope, hence providing no information about the entanglement type. To overcome this problem, we propose to additionally use local filters. We experimentally demonstrate the detection of entanglement polytopes in a four-qubit system. Using local filters we can distinguish the entanglement type of states with the same single particle spectra, but which belong to different polytopes.
  • We consider the problem of implementing mutually unbiased bases (MUB) for a polarization qubit with only one wave plate, the minimum number of wave plates. We show that one wave plate is sufficient to realize two MUB as long as its phase shift (modulo $360^\circ$) ranges between $45^\circ$ and $315^\circ$. {It can realize} three MUB (a complete set of MUB for a qubit) if the phase shift of the wave plate is within $[111.5^\circ, 141.7^\circ]$ or its symmetric range with respect to 180$^\circ$. The systematic error of the realized MUB using a third-wave plate (TWP) with $120^\circ$ phase is calculated to be a half of that using the combination of a quarter-wave plate (QWP) and a half-wave plate (HWP). As experimental applications, TWPs are used in single-qubit and two-qubit quantum state tomography experiments and the results show a systematic error reduction by $50\%$. This technique not only saves one wave plate but also reduces the systematic error, which can be applied to quantum state tomography and other applications involving MUB. The proposed TWP may become a useful instrument in optical experiments, replacing multiple elements like QWP and HWP.
  • A simple yet efficient method of linear regression estimation (LRE) is presented for quantum state tomography. In this method, quantum state reconstruction is converted into a parameter estimation problem of a linear regression model and the least-squares method is employed to estimate the unknown parameters. The asymptotic mean squared error (MSE) bound of the estimate can be given analytically, which can guide one to choose optimal measurement sets. The LRE is asymptotically optimal in the sense that the MSE may achieve the Cram\'{e}r-Rao bound asymptotically. The computational complexity of LRE is O(d^4), where d is the dimension of the quantum state. Numerical examples show that LRE is much faster than maximum-likelihood estimation for quantum state tomography.