• We present a computational study of the hydrodynamic coarsening in 3D of a critical mixture using the Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes model. The topology of the resulting intricate bicontinuous microstructure is analyzed through the principal curvatures to prove self-similar morphological evolution. We find that the self similarity exists for both systems: iso-viscous and with variable viscosity. However the two system have distinct topological character. Our simulations confirm that the predicted viscous growth regime exists in both cases. Moreover the coarsening rate is inversely proportional to an \textit{effective viscosity} that is the geometrical average of the viscosities of the two phases.
  • Structural aspects of crystal nucleation in undercooled liquids are explored using a nonlinear hydrodynamic theory of crystallization proposed recently [G. I. Toth et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 055001 (2014)], which is based on combining fluctuating hydrodynamics with the phase-field crystal theory. We show that in this hydrodynamic approach not only homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation processes are accessible, but also growth front nucleation, which leads to the formation of new (differently oriented) grains at the solid-liquid front in highly undercooled systems. Formation of dislocations at the solid-liquid interface and interference of density waves ahead of the crystallization front are responsible for the appearance of the new orientations at the growth front that lead to spherulite-like nanostructures.
  • A multigrid scheme is proposed for the pressure equation of the incompressible unsteady fluid flow equations, allowing efficient implementation on clusters of modern CPUs, many integrated core devices (MICs), and graphics processing units (GPUs). It is shown that the total number of the synchronization events can be significantly reduced when a deep, 2h grid hierarchy is replaced with a two-level scheme using 16h-32h restriction, fitting to the the width of the SIMD engine of modern CPUs and GPUs. In addition, optimal memory transfer is also ensured, since no strided memory access is required. We report increasing arithmetic intensity of the smoothing steps when compared to the conventional additive correction multigrid (ACM), however it is counterbalanced in runtime by the decreasing number of the expensive restriction steps. A systematic construction methodology for the coarse grid stencil is also presented that helps in moderating the excess arithmetic intensity associated with the aggressive coarsening. Our higher order interpolated stencil improves convergence rate via minimizing spurious interference between the coarse and the fine scale solutions. The method is demonstrated on solving the pressure equation for 2D incompressible fluid flow: The benchmark setups cover shear driven laminar flow in cavity, and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent jet. We have compared our scheme to the ACM in terms of the arithmetic intensity of the iterations and the number of the synchronization calls required. Also the strong scaling is plotted for our scheme when using a hybrid OpenCl/MPI based parallelization.
  • Crystallization of supersaturated liquids usually starts by heterogeneous nucleation. Mounting evidence shows that even homogeneous nucleation in simple liquids takes place in two steps; first a dense amorphous precursor forms, and the crystalline phase appears via heterogeneous nucleation in/on the precursor cluster. Herein, we review recent results by a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal model, for (precursor-mediated) homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of nanocrystals. It will be shown that the mismatch between the lattice constants of the nucleating crystal and the substrate plays a decisive role in determining the contact angle and nucleation barrier, which were found to be non-monotonic functions of the lattice mismatch. Time dependent studies are essential as investigations based on equilibrium properties often cannot identify the preferred nucleation pathways. Modeling of these phenomena is essential for designing materials on the basis of controlled nucleation and/or nano-patterning.
  • We present an isothermal fluctuating nonlinear hydrodynamic theory of crystallization in molecular liquids. A dynamic coarse-graining technique is used to derive the velocity field, a phenomenology, which allows a direct coupling between the free energy functional of the classical Density Functional Theory and the Navier-Stokes equation. Contrary to the Ginzburg-Landau type amplitude theories, the dynamic response to elastic deformations is described by parameter-free kinetic equations. Employing our approach to the free energy functional of the Phase-Field Crystal model, we recover the classical spectrum for the phonons and the steady-state growth fronts. The capillary wave spectrum of the equilibrium crystal-liquid interface is in a good qualitative agreement with the molecular dynamics simulations.
  • Here, we review the basic concepts and applications of the phase-field-crystal (PFC) method, which is one of the latest simulation methodologies in materials science for problems, where atomic- and microscales are tightly coupled. The PFC method operates on atomic length and diffusive time scales, and thus constitutes a computationally efficient alternative to molecular simulation methods. Its intense development in materials science started fairly recently following the work by Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002), p. 245701]. Since these initial studies, dynamical density functional theory and thermodynamic concepts have been linked to the PFC approach to serve as further theoretical fundaments for the latter. In this review, we summarize these methodological development steps as well as the most important applications of the PFC method with a special focus on the interaction of development steps taken in hard and soft matter physics, respectively. Doing so, we hope to present today's state of the art in PFC modelling as well as the potential, which might still arise from this method in physics and materials science in the nearby future.
  • Dynamical density functional simulations reveal structural aspects of crystal nucleation in undercooled liquids: the first appearing solid is amorphous, which promotes the nucleation of bcc crystals, but suppresses the appearance of the fcc and hcp phases. These findings are associated with features of the effective interaction potential deduced from the amorphous structure.
  • We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3d, and determine the line free energy in 2d, the height of the nucleation barrier in 2d and 3d for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from sphere to the specific faceted shapes: rhombic-dodecahedron (bcc), truncated-octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic, which anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggrega-tion in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simula-tions. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.
  • We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field-crystal (PFC) model, to describe homogeneous and heterogeneous crystal nucleation in 2d monodisperse colloidal systems and crystal nucleation in highly compressed Fe liquid. External periodic potentials are used to approximate inert crystalline substrates in addressing heterogeneous nucleation. In agreement with experiments in 2d colloids, the PFC model predicts that in 2d supersaturated liquids, crystalline freezing starts with homogeneous crystal nucleation without the occurrence of the hexatic phase. At extreme supersaturations crystal nucleation happens after the appearance of an amorphous precursor phase both in 2d and 3d. We demonstrate that contrary to expectations based on the classical nucleation theory, corners are not necessarily favourable places for crystal nucleation. Finally, we show that adding external potential terms to the free energy, the PFC theory can be used to model colloid patterning experiments.
  • Many structural materials (metal alloys, polymers, minerals, etc.) are formed by quenching liquids into crystalline solids. This highly non-equilibrium process often leads to polycrystalline growth patterns that are broadly termed "spherulites" because of their large-scale average spherical shape. Despite the prevalence and practical importance of spherulite formation, only rather qualitative concepts of this phenomenon exist. The present work explains the growth and form of these fundamental condensed matter structures on the basis of a unified field theoretic approach. Our phase field model is the first to incorporate the essential ingredients for this type crystal growth: anisotropies in both the surface energy and interface mobilities that are responsible for needle-like growth, trapping of local orientational order due to either static heterogeneities (impurities) or dynamic heterogeneities in highly supercooled liquids, and a preferred relative grain orientation induced by a misorientation-dependent grain boundary energy. Our calculations indicate that the diversity of spherulite growth forms arises from a competition between the ordering effect of discrete local crystallographic symmetries and the randomization of the local crystallographic orientation that accompanies crystal grain nucleation at the growth front (growth front nucleation or GFN). The large-scale isotropy of spherulitic growth arises from the predominance of GFN.