• The potential existence of a giant planet orbiting within a few AU of a stellar remnant has profound implications for both the survival and possible regeneration of planets during post-main sequence stellar evolution. This paper reports Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor and U.S. Naval Observatory relative astrometry of GD 66, a white dwarf thought to harbor a giant planet between 2 and 3 AU based on stellar pulsation arrival times. Combined with existing infrared data, the precision measurements here rule out all stellar-mass and brown dwarf companions, implying that only a planet remains plausible, if orbital motion is indeed the cause of the variations in pulsation timing.
  • We present a model atmosphere analysis of optical VRI and infrared JHK photometric data of about two dozen ZZ Ceti stars. We first show from a theoretical point of view that the resulting energy distributions are not particularly sensitive to surface gravity or to the assumed convective efficiency, a result which suggests a parameter-free effective temperature indicator for ZZ Ceti stars. We then fit the observed energy distributions with our grid of model atmospheres and compare the photometric effective temperatures with the spectroscopic values obtained from fits to the hydrogen line profiles. Our results are finally discussed in the context of the determination of the empirical boundaries of the ZZ Ceti instability strip.
  • We report a late M-type, common proper motion companion to a nearby young visual binary HIP 115147 (V368 Cep), separated by 963 arcseconds from the primary K0 dwarf. This optically dim star has been identified as a candidate high proper motion, nearby dwarf LSPM J2322+7847 by L{\'e}pine in 2005. The wide companion is one of the latest post-T Tauri low mass stars found within 20 pc. We obtain a trigonometric parallax of $51.6\pm0.8$ mas, in good agreement with the Hipparcos parallax of the primary star ($50.7\pm0.6$ mas). Our $BVRI$ photometric data and near-infrared data from 2MASS are consistent with LSPM J2322+7847 being brighter by 1 magnitude in $K_s$ than field M dwarfs at $V-K_s=6.66$, which indicates its pre-main sequence status. We conclude that the most likely age of the primary HIP 115147 and its 11-arcsecond companion HIP 115147B is 20-50 Myr. The primary appears to be older than its close analog PZ Tel (age 12-20 Myr) and members of the TWA association (7 Myr).
  • We present a detailed analysis of a large spectroscopic and photometric sample of DZ white dwarfs based on our latest model atmosphere calculations. We revise the atmospheric parameters of the trigonometric parallax sample of Bergeron, Leggett, & Ruiz (12 stars) and analyze 147 new DZ white dwarfs discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The inclusion of metals and hydrogen in our model atmosphere calculations leads to different atmospheric parameters than those derived from pure helium models. Calcium abundances are found in the range from log (Ca/He) = -12 to -8. We also find that fits of the coolest objects show peculiarities, suggesting that our physical models may not correctly describe the conditions of high atmospheric pressure encountered in the coolest DZ stars. We find that the mean mass of the 11 DZ stars with trigonometric parallaxes, <M> = 0.63 Mo, is significantly lower than that obtained from pure helium models, <M> = 0.78 Mo, and in much better agreement with the mean mass of other types of white dwarfs. We determine hydrogen abundances for 27% of the DZ stars in our sample, while only upper limits are obtained for objects with low signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic data. We confirm with a high level of confidence that the accretion rate of hydrogen is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that of metals (and up to five in some cases) to be compatible with the observations. We find a correlation between the hydrogen abundance and the effective temperature, suggesting for the first time empirical evidence of a lower temperature boundary for the hydrogen screening mechanism. Finally, we speculate on the possibility that the DZA white dwarfs could be the result of the convective mixing of thin hydrogen-rich atmospheres with the underlying helium convection zone.
  • A reanalysis of the strongly metal-blanketed DZ white dwarf G165-7 is presented. An improved grid of model atmospheres and synthetic spectra is used to analyze BVRI, JHK, and ugriz photometric observations as well as a high quality Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum covering the energy distribution from 3600 to 9000 A. The detection of splitting in several lines of Ca, Na, and Fe, suggesting a magnetic field of Bs~650 kG, is confirmed by spectropolarimetric observations that reveal as much as +/- 7.5% circular polarization in many of the absorption lines, most notably Na, Mg, and Fe. Our combined photometric and spectroscopic fit yields Teff = 6440 K, log g=7.99, log H/He=-3.0 and log Ca/He=-8.1. The other heavy elements have solar ratios with respect to calcium, with the exception of Na and Cr that had to be reduced by a factor of two and three, respectively. A crude polarization model based upon the observed local spectral flux gradient yields a longitudinal field of 165 kG, consistent with the mean surface field inferred from the Zeeman splitting. The inclusion of this weak magnetic field in our synthetic spectrum calculations, even in an approximate fashion, is shown to improve our fit significantly.
  • This article presents a measurement of the proper motion of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy determined from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in the imaging mode.
  • An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15<g<20 is found to be ~2.2 deg^{-2} at Galactic latitudes 29-62 deg. Spectra are obtained for roughly half of these hot stars. The spectra show that, for 15<g<17, 40% of hot stars are WDs and the fraction of WDs rises to ~90% at g=20. The remainder are hot sdB and sdO stars.
  • Trigonometric parallax determinations are presented for 28 late type dwarfs and brown dwarfs, including eight M dwarfs with spectral types between M7 and M9.5, 17 L dwarfs with spectral types between L0 and L8, and three T dwarfs. Broadband photometry at CCD wavelengths (VRIz) and/or near-IR wavelengths (JHK) are presented for these objects and for 24 additional late-type dwarfs. Supplemented with astrometry and photometry from the literature, including ten L and two T dwarfs with parallaxes established by association with bright, usually HIPPARCOS primaries, this material forms the basis for studying various color-color and color-absolute magnitude relations. The I-J color is a good predictor of absolute magnitude for late-M and L dwarfs. M_J becomes monotonically fainter with I-J color and with spectral type through late-L dwarfs, then brightens for early-T dwarfs. The combination of zJK colors alone can be used to classify late-M, early-L, and T dwarfs accurately, and to predict their absolute magnitudes, but is less effective at untangling the scatter among mid- and late-L dwarfs. The mean tangential velocity of these objects is found to be slightly less than that for dM stars in the solar neighborhood, consistent with a sample with a mean age of several Gyr. Using colors to estimate bolometric corrections, and models to estimate stellar radii, effective temperatures are derived. The latest L dwarfs are found to have T_eff ~ 1360 K.
  • Early data taken during commissioning of the SDSS have resulted in the discovery of a very cool white dwarf. It appears to have stronger collision induced absorption from molecular hydrogen than any other known white dwarf, suggesting it has a cooler temperature than any other. While its distance is presently unknown, it has a surprisingly small proper motion, making it unlikely to be a halo star. An analysis of white dwarf cooling times suggests that this object may be a low-mass star with a helium core. The SDSS imaging and spectroscopy also recovered LHS 3250, the coolest previously known white dwarf, indicating that the SDSS will be an effective tool for identifying these extreme objects.
  • Preliminary trigonometric parallaxes and BVI photometry are presented for two dwarf carbon stars, LP765-18 (= LHS1075) and LP328-57 (= CLS96). The data are combined with the literature values for a third dwarf carbon star, G77-61 (= LHS1555). All three stars have very similar luminosities (9.6<M_V<10.0) and very similar broadband colors across the entire visual-to-near IR (BVIJHK) wavelength range. Their visual (BVI) colors differ from all known red dwarfs, subdwarfs, and white dwarfs. In the M_V versus V-I color-magnitude diagram they are approximately 2 magnitudes subluminous compared with normal disk dwarfs with solar-like metallicities, occupying a region also populated by O-rich subdwarfs with -1.5<[m/H]<-1.0. The kinematics indicate that they are members of the Galactic spheroid population. The subluminosity of all three stars is due to an as-yet-unknown combination of (undoubtedly low) metallicity, possibly enhanced helium abundance, and unusual line-blanketing in the bandpasses considered. The properties of the stars are compared with models for the production of dwarf carbon stars.