• Asteroids can be classified into several groups based on their spectral reflectance. Among these groups, the one belonging to the L-class in the taxonomic classification based on visible and near-infrared spectra exhibit several peculiar properties. First, their near-infrared spectrum is characterized by a strong absorption band interpreted as the diagnostic of a high content of the FeO bearing spinel mineral. This mineral is one of the main constituents of Calcium-Aluminum-rich Inclusions (CAI) the oldest mineral compounds found in the solar system. In polarimetry, they possess an uncommonly large value of the inversion angle incompatible with all known asteroid belonging to other taxonomical classes. Asteroids found to possess such a high inversion angle are commonly called Barbarians based on the first asteroid on which this property was first identified, (234)~Barbara. In this paper we present the results of an extensive campaign of polarimetric and spectroscopic observations of L-class objects. We have derived phase-polarization curves for a sample of 7 Barbarians, finding a variety of inversion angles ranging between 25 and 30$^{\circ}$. Spectral reflectance data exhibit variations in terms of spectral slope and absorption features in the near-infrared. We analyzed these data using a Hapke model to obtain some inferences about the relative abundance of CAI and other mineral compounds. By combining spectroscopic and polarimetric results, we find evidence that the polarimetric inversion angle is directly correlated with the presence of CAI, and the peculiar polarimetric properties of Barbarians are primarily a consequence of their anomalous composition.
  • The Cybele and Hilda dynamical groups delimit the outer edge of the asteroid belt. Their compositional distribution is a key element to constrain evolutionary models of the Solar System. In this paper, we present a compositional analysis of these populations using spectroscopic observations, SDSS and NEOWISE data. As part of the PRIMASS (Primitive Asteroids Spectroscopic Survey), we acquired visible spectra of 18 objects in Hilda or Cybele groups with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer at the 4.1m SOAR telescope and 20 near-IR spectra of Hilda objects with Near Infrared Camera Spectrograph at the 3.56m TNG. The sample is enlarged with spectra taken from the literature in order to increase our statistical analysis. The spectra were inspected for aqueous alteration bands and other spectral features that can be linked to compositional constraints. The analysis shows a continuous distribution of compositions from the main-belt to the Cybele, Hilda and Trojan regions. We also identify a population in the Trojans group not present in Hilda or Cybele objects.
  • Themis is an old and statistically robust asteroid family populating the outer main belt, and resulting from a catastrophic collision that took place 2.5$\pm$1.0 Gyr ago. Within the old Themis family a young sub-family, Beagle, formed less than 10 Myr ago, has been identified. We present the results of a spectroscopic survey in the visible and near infrared range of 22 Themis and 8 Beagle families members. The Themis members investigated exhibit a wide range of spectral behaviors, while the younger Beagle family members look spectrally bluer with a smaller spectral slope variability. The best meteorite spectral analogues found for both Themis and Beagle families members are carbonaceous chondrites having experienced different degrees of aqueous alteration, prevalently CM2 but also CV3 and CI, and some of them are chondrite samples being unusual or heated. We extended the spectral analysis including the data available in the literature on Themis and Beagle families members, and we looked for correlations between spectral behavior and physical parameters using the albedo and size values derived from the WISE data. The analysis of this larger sample confirm the spectral diversity within the Themis family and that Beagle members tend to be bluer and to have an higher albedo. The differences between the two family may be partially explained by space weathering processes, which act on these primitive surfaces in a similar way than on S-type asteroids, i.e. producing reddening and darkening. However we see several Themis members having albedos and spectral slopes similar to the young Beagle members. Alternative scenarios are proposed including heterogeneity in the parent body having a compositional gradient with depth, and/or the survival of projectile fragments having a different composition than the parent body.
  • We present results from SEPPCoN, an on-going Survey of the Ensemble Physical Properties of Cometary Nuclei. In this report we discuss mid-infrared measurements of the thermal emission from 89 nuclei of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). All data were obtained in 2006 and 2007 with the Spitzer Space Telescope. For all 89 comets, we present new effective radii, and for 57 comets we present beaming parameters. Thus our survey provides the largest compilation of radiometrically-derived physical properties of nuclei to date. We conclude the following. (a) The average beaming parameter of the JFC population is 1.03+/-0.11, consistent with unity, and indicating low thermal inertia. (b) The known JFC population is not complete even at 3 km radius, and even for comets with perihelia near ~2 AU. (c) We find that the JFC nuclear cumulative size distribution (CSD) has a power-law slope of around -1.9. (d) This power-law is close to that derived from visible-wavelength observations, suggesting that there is no strong dependence of geometric albedo with radius. (e) The observed CSD shows a hint of structure with an excess of comets with radii 3 to 6 km. (f) Our CSD is consistent with an intrinsic distribution that lacks many sub-kilometer objects.
  • Near-Earth binary asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 is the current backup target of the ESA MarcoPolo-R mission, selected for the study phase of ESA M3 missions. It is a primitive (C-type) asteroid that shows significant variation in its visible and near-infrared spectra. Here we present new spectra of 1996 FG3 and we compare our new data with other published spectra, analysing the variation in the spectral slope. The asteroid will not be observable again over the next three years at least. We obtained the spectra using DOLORES and NICS instruments at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), a 3.6m telescope located at El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in La Palma, Spain. To compare with other published spectra of the asteroid, we computed the spectral slope S', and studied any plausible correlation of this quantity with the phase angle (alpha). In the case of visible spectra, we find a variation in spectral slope of Delta S' = 0.15 +- 0.10 %/10^3 A/degree for 3 < alpha < 18 degrees, in good agreement with the values found in the literature for the phase reddening effect. In the case of the near-infrared, we find a variation in the slope of Delta S' = 0.04 +- 0.08 %/10^3 A/degree for 6 < alpha < 51 degrees. Our computed variation in S' agrees with the only two values found in the literature for the phase reddening in the near-infrared. The variation in the spectral slope of asteroid 1996 FG3 shows a trend with the phase angle at the time of the observations, both in the visible and the near-infrared. It is worth noting that, to fully explain this spectral variability we should take into account other factors, like the position of the secondary component of the binary asteroid 1999 FG3 with respect to the primary, or the spin axis orientation at the time of the observations. More data are necessary for an analysis of this kind.
  • Context. Primitive asteroids contain complex organic material and ices relevant to the origin of life on Earth. These types of asteroids are the target of several-sample return missions to be launched in the next years. 1999 JU3 is the target of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa 2 mission. Aims. 1999 JU3 has been previously identified as a C-class asteroid. Spectroscopic observations at longer wavelengths will help to constrain its composition. Methods. We obtained spectroscopy of 1999 JU3 from 0.85 to 2.2 microns, with the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo using the low resolution mode of the Near Infrared Camera Spectrograph. Results. We present a near-infrared spectrum of 1999 JU3 from 0.85 to 2.2microns that is consistent with previously published spectra and with its C-type classification. Conclusions. Our spectrum confirms the primitive nature of 1999 JU3 and its interest as target of the sample-return mission Hayabusa 2.
  • We present a study of the radial distribution of dust species in young brown dwarf disks. Our work is based on a compositional analysis of the 10 and 20 micron silicate emission features for brown dwarfs in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. A fundamental finding of our work is that brown dwarfs exhibit stronger signs of dust processing in the cold component of the disk, compared to the higher mass T Tauri stars in Taurus. For nearly all of our targets, we find a flat disk structure, which is consistent with the stronger signs of dust processing observed in these disks. For the case of one brown dwarf, 2M04230607, we find the forsterite mass fraction to be a factor of ~3 higher in the outer disk compared to the inner disk region. Simple large-scale radial mixing cannot account for this gradient in the dust chemical composition, and some local crystalline formation mechanism may be effective in this disk. The relatively high abundance of crystalline silicates in the outer cold regions of brown dwarf disks provides an interesting analogy to comets. In this context, we have discussed the applicability of the various mechanisms that have been proposed for comets on the formation and the outward transport of high-temperature material. We also present Chandra X-ray observations for two Taurus brown dwarfs, 2M04414825 and CFHT-BD-Tau 9. We find 2M04414825, which has a ~12% crystalline mass fraction, to be more than an order of magnitude brighter in X-ray than CFHT-BD-Tau 9, which has a ~35% crystalline mass fraction. Combining with previous X-ray data, we find the inner disk crystalline mass fractions to be anti-correlated with the X-ray strength.
  • Context. Near-Earth asteroid-comet transition object 107P/ (4015) Wilson-Harrington is a possible target of the joint European Space Agency (ESA) and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Marco Polo sample return mission. Physical studies of this object are relevant to this mission, and also to understanding its asteroidal or cometary nature. Aims. Our aim is to obtain significant new constraints on the surface thermal properties of this object. Methods. We present mid-infrared photometry in two filters (16 and 22 microns) obtained with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope on February 12, 2007, and results from the application of the Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM).We obtained high S/N in two mid-IR bands allowing accurate measurements of its thermal emission. Results. We obtain a well constrained beaming parameter (eta = 1.39 +/- 0.26) and obtain a diameter and geometric albedo of D = 3.46 +/- 0.32 km, and pV = 0.059 +/- 0.011. We also obtain similar results when we apply this best-fitting thermal model to single-band mid-IR photometry reported by Campins et al. (1995), Kraemer et al. (2005) and Reach et al. (2007). Conclusions. The albedo of 4015 Wilson-Harrington is low, consistent with those of comet nuclei and primitive C-, P-, D-type asteorids. We establish a rough lower limit for the thermal inertia of W-H of 60 Jm^-2s^(-0.5)K^-1 when it is at r=1AU, which is slightly over the limit of 30 Jm^-2s^(-0.5)K-1 derived by Groussin et al. (2009) for the thermal inertia of the nucleus of comet 22P/Kopff.
  • Near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999 JU3) is the primary target of the Hayabusa-2 sample return mission, and a potential target of the Marco Polo sample return mission. Earth-based studies of this object are fundamental to these missions. We present a mid-infrared spectrum (5-38 microns) of 1999 JU3 obtained with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope in May 2008. These observations place new constraints on the surface properties of this asteroid. To fit our spectrum we used the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and the more complex thermophysical model (TPM). However, the position of the spin-pole, which is uncertain, is a crucial input parameter for constraining the thermal inertia with the TPM; hence, we consider two pole orientations. In the extreme case of an equatorial retrograde geometry we derive a lower limit to the thermal inertia of 150 J/m^2/K/s^0.5. If we adopt the pole orientation of Abe et al. (2008a) our best-fit thermal model yields a value for the thermal inertia of 700+/-200 J/m^2/K/s^0.5 and even higher values are allowed by the uncertainty in the spectral shape due to the absolute flux calibration. The lower limit to the thermal inertia, which is unlikely but possible, would be consistent with a fine regolith similar to wthat is found for asteroid 433 Eros. However, the thermal inertia is expected to be higher, possibly similar to or greater than that on asteroid 25143 Itokawa. Accurately determining the spin-pole of asteroid 162173 will narrow the range of possible values for its thermal inertia.
  • We present an analysis of thermal emission from comet 162P/Siding Spring (P/2004 TU12) measured during its discovery apparition in 2004 December. The comet showed no dust coma at this time, so we have sampled emission from the comet's nucleus. Observations using the Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) were performed at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, where the peak of the comet's spectral energy distribution was observed between 8 and 25 microns. In combination with the three near-IR spectra presented by Campins et al. (2006, Astron. J. 132, 1346) that show the Wien-law tail of the thermal emission, the data provide powerful constraints on surface properties of the nucleus. We find that the nucleus's effective radius is 6.0+/-0.8 km. This is one of the largest radii known among Jupiter-family comets, which is unusual considering that the comet was discovered only recently. Its geometric albedo is 0.059+/-0.023 in the H band, 0.037+/-0.014 in the R band, and 0.034+/-0.013 in the V band. We also find that the nucleus of 162P has little IR beaming, and this implies that the nucleus has low thermal inertia. Including all near-IR spectra yields a beaming parameter of 1.01+/-0.20. This result is in agreement with others showing that cometary nuclei have low thermal inertia and little IR beaming. If confirmed for many nuclei, the interpretation of radiometry may not be as problematic as feared.
  • Comet Hale-Bopp was observed five times with ISOPHOT, the photometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Each time broadband photometry was performed using 4 different detectors, 5 apertures and, 10 filters covering the range between 3.6 to 175 $\mu$m. Calibration measurements using the internal Fine Calibration Source were done together with each individual measurement. Background observations were performed with identical instrument settings at the same positions on the sky several days after the comet observations. The observation strategy and the initial data reduction steps are described in some detail and the resulting in-band power values of the Hale-Bopp observations and their uncertainties are derived. Initial reduction of these measurements was performed in 3 steps: (1) processing of raw data by removing instrumental and energetic particle effects, (2) averaging of the individual signals, and (3) determination of the detector responsivities and their uncertainties. The detector signal is determined by two different methods and the best value is chosen. At the present level of processing uncertainties range from 10% to a factor of 3 for the low power levels at short wavelengths. The in-band power levels at different wavelengths varied over 3 orders of magnitude.