• By performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we address the topological phase of CaAgP and investigate the topological phase transition in CaAg(P1-xAsx). We reveal that in CaAgP, the bulk band gap and surface states with a large bandwidth are topologically trivial, in agreement with hybrid density functional theory calculations. The calculations also indicate that application of "negative" hydrostatic pressure can transform trivial semiconducting CaAgP into an ideal topological nodal-line semimetal phase. The topological transition can be realized by partial isovalent P/As substitution at x = 0.38.
  • Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study superconductivity that emerges in two extreme cases, from a Fermi liquid phase (LiFeAs) and an incoherent bad-metal phase (FeTe0.55Se0.45). We find that although the electronic coherence can strongly reshape the single-particle spectral function in the superconducting state, it is decoupled from the maximum superconducting pairing amplitude, which shows a universal scaling that is valid for all FeSCs. Our observation excludes pairing scenarios in the BCS and the BEC limit for FeSCs and calls for a universal strong coupling pairing mechanism for the FeSCs.
  • The nanometer scale lattice deformation brought about by the dopants in high temperature superconducting cuprate La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$(x=0.08) was investigated by measuring the associated X-ray diffuse scattering around multiple Bragg peaks. A characteristic diffuse scattering pattern was observed, which can be well described by continuum elastic theory. With the fitted dipole force parameters, the acoustic type lattice deformation pattern was re-constructed and found to be of similar size to lattice thermal vibration at 7 K. Our results address the long-term concern of dopant introduced local lattice inhomogeneity, and show that the associated nanometer scale lattice deformation is marginal and cannot, alone, be responsible for the patched variation in the spectral gaps observed with scanning tunneling microscopy in the cuprates.
  • Ultrafast pump-probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behavior like changes in its electronic configuration in real time. So far, such measurements have widely relied on high harmonic generation (HHG) with ultrashort laser pulses, limiting the achievable wavelength range to the extreme ultraviolet regime. However, to directly excite site-specific core states of molecules or more complex systems, photon energies in the water window and above are required. Novel light sources based on laser-driven electron accelerators have demonstrated bright radiation production over a wide energy range. Given the phase space of the electron bunches could be shaped in an adequate way, these sources would also be suitable for high-energy ultrafast pump-probe experimentation. Here, we report for the first time on the simultaneous generation of two monoenergetic electron bunches with individually tunable energy up to several hundred MeV. Due to the underlying injection physics, the lengths of the bunches as well as their temporal separation inherently amount to femtoseconds. In combination with established beam-handling and insertion devices, these results pave the way to laboratory-scale multi-beam experiments with unprecedented scope in energy tuning and time resolution.
  • Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons represents a basis for several types of novel X-ray sources based on Thomson scattering or betatron radiation. The latter provides a high photon flux and a small source size, both being prerequisites for high-quality X-ray imaging. Furthermore, proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated its application for tomographic imaging. So far this required several hours of acquisition time for a complete tomographic data set. Based on improvements to the laser system, detectors and reconstruction algorithms, we were able to reduce this time for a full tomographic scan to 3 minutes. In this paper, we discuss these results and give a prospect to future imaging systems.
  • We utilized X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the crystal surface of Weyl semimetal NbAs. XPEEM images present white and black contrast in both the Nb 3d and As 3d core level spectra. Surface-sensitive XPS spectra indicate that the entire surface of the sample contains both surface states of Nb 3d and As 3d, in form of oxides, and bulk states of NbAs. Estimated atomic percentage values nNb/nAs suggest that the surface is Nb-rich and asymmetric for white and black areas.
  • Laser-driven X-ray sources are an emerging alternative to conventional X-ray tubes and synchrotron sources. We present results on microtomographic X-ray imaging of a cancellous human bone sample using synchrotron-like betatron radiation. The source is driven by a 100-TW-class titanium-sapphire laser system and delivers over $10^8$ X-ray photons per second. Compared to earlier studies, the acquisition time for an entire tomographic dataset has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Additionally, the reconstruction quality benefits from the use of statistical iterative reconstruction techniques. Depending on the desired resolution, tomographies are thereby acquired within minutes, which is an important milestone towards real-life applications of laser-plasma X-ray sources.
  • While recent advances in band theory and sample growth have expanded the series of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) semimetals in transition metal dipnictides $TmPn_2$ ($Tm$ = Ta, Nb; $Pn$ = P, As, Sb), the experimental study on their electronic structure and the origin of XMR is still absent. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations and magnetotransport measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on MoAs$_2$, which is isostructural to the $TmPn_2$ family and also exhibits quadratic XMR. We resolve a clear band structure well agreeing with the predictions. Intriguingly, the unambiguously observed Fermi surfaces (FSs) are dominated by an open-orbit topology extending along both the [100] and [001] directions in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. We further reveal the trivial topological nature of MoAs$_2$ by bulk parity analysis. Based on these results, we examine the proposed XMR mechanisms in other semimetals, and conclusively ascribe the origin of quadratic XMR in MoAs$_2$ to the carriers motion on the FSs with dominant open-orbit topology, innovating in the understanding of quadratic XMR in semimetals.
  • Topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals not only host quasiparticles analogous to the elementary fermionic particles in high-energy physics, but also have nontrivial band topology manifested by exotic Fermi arcs on the surface. Recent advances suggest new types of topological semimetals, in which spatial symmetries protect gapless electronic excitations without high-energy analogy. Here we observe triply-degenerate nodal points (TPs) near the Fermi level of WC, in which the low-energy quasiparticles are described as three-component fermions distinct from Dirac and Weyl fermions. We further observe the surface states whose constant energy contours are pairs of Fermi arcs connecting the surface projection of the TPs, proving the nontrivial topology of the newly identified semimetal state.
  • We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of BaCr$_2$As$_2$, which has the same crystal structure as BaFe$_2$As$_2$, a parent compound of Fe-based superconductors. We determine the Fermi surface of this material and its band dispersion over 5 eV of binding energy. Very moderate band renormalization (1.35) is observed for only two bands. We attribute this small renormalization to enhanced direct exchange as compared to Fe in BaFe$_2$As$_2$, and to a larger contribution of the $e_g$ orbitals in the composition of the bands forming the Fermi surface, leading to an effective valence count that is reduced by Fe $d$ - As $p$ hybridization.
  • We performed a Raman scattering study of thin films of LiTi$_2$O$_4$ spinel oxide superconductor. We detected four out of five Raman active modes, with frequencies in good accordance with our first-principles calculations. Three T$_{2g}$ modes show a Fano lineshape from 5 K to 295 K, which suggests an electron-phonon coupling in LiTi$_2$O$_4$. Interestingly, the electron-phonon coupling shows an anomaly across the negative to positive magnetoresistance transition at 50 K, which may be due to the unset of other competing orders. The strength of the electron-phonon interaction estimated from the Allen's formula and the observed lineshape parameters suggests that the three T$_{2g}$ modes contribute little to superconductivity.
  • The intriguing role of nematicity in iron-based superconductors, defined as broken rotational symmetry below a characteristic temperature, is an intensely investigated contemporary subject. Nematicity is closely connected to the structural transition, however, it is highly doubtful that the lattice degree of freedom is responsible for its formation, given the accumulating evidence for the observed large anisotropy. Here we combine molecular beam epitaxy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy together to study the nematicity in multilayer FeSe films on SrTiO3. Our results demonstrate direct connection between electronic anisotropy in momentum space and standing waves in real space at atomic scale. The lifting of orbital degeneracy of dxz/dyz bands gives rise to a pair of Dirac cone structures near the zone corner, which causes energy-independent unidirectional interference fringes, observed in real space as standing waves by scattering electrons off C2 domain walls and Se-defects. On the other hand, the formation of C2 nematic domain walls unexpectedly shows no correlation with lattice strain pattern, which is induced by the lattice mismatch between the film and substrate. Our results establish a clean case that the nematicity is driven by electronic rather than lattice degrees of freedom in FeSe films.
  • By employing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we performed a systematic investigation on the electronic structure of LaBi, which exhibits extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR), and is theoretically predicted to possess band anticrossing with nontrivial topological properties. Here, the observations of the Fermi-surface topology and band dispersions are similar to previous studies on LaSb [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 127204 (2016)], a topologically trivial XMR semimetal, except the existence of a band inversion along the $\Gamma$-$X$ direction, with one massless and one gapped Dirac-like surface state at the $X$ and $\Gamma$ points, respectively. The odd number of massless Dirac cones suggests that LaBi is analogous to the time-reversal $Z_2$ nontrivial topological insulator. These findings open up a new series for exploring novel topological states and investigating their evolution from the perspective of topological phase transition within the family of rare-earth monopnictides.
  • We report a polarized Raman scattering study of non-symmorphic topological insulator KHgSb with hourglass-like electronic dispersion. Supported by theoretical calculations, we show that the lattice of the previously assigned space group $P6_3/mmc$ (No. 194) is unstable in KHgSb. While we observe one of two calculated Raman active E$_{2g}$ phonons of space group $P6_3/mmc$ at room temperature, an additional A$_{1g}$ peak appears at 99.5 ~cm$^{-1}$ upon cooling below $T^*$ = 150 K, which suggests a lattice distortion. Several weak peaks associated with two-phonon excitations emerge with this lattice instability. We also show that the sample is very sensitive to high temperature and high laser power, conditions under which it quickly decomposes, leading to the formation of Sb. Our first-principles calculations indicate that space group $P6_3mc$ (No. 186), corresponding to a vertical displacement of the Sb atoms with respect to the Hg atoms that breaks the inversion symmetry, is lower in energy than the presumed $P6_3/mmc$ structure and preserves the glide plane symmetry necessary to the formation of hourglass fermions.
  • The Weyl semimetal phase is a recently discovered topological quantum state of matter characterized by the presence of topologically protected degeneracies near the Fermi level. These degeneracies are the source of exotic phenomena, including the realization of chiral Weyl fermions as quasiparticles in the bulk and the formation of Fermi arc states on the surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that these two key signatures show distinct evolutions with the bulk band topology by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, supported by first-principle calculations, on transition-metal monophosphides. While Weyl fermion quasiparticles exist only when the chemical potential is located between two saddle points of the Weyl cone features, the Fermi arc states extend in a larger energy scale and are robust across the bulk Lifshitz transitions associated with the recombination of two non-trivial Fermi surfaces enclosing one Weyl point into a single trivial Fermi surface enclosing two Weyl points of opposite chirality. Therefore, in some systems (e.g. NbP), topological Fermi arc states are preserved even if Weyl fermion quasiparticles are absent in the bulk. Our findings not only provide insight into the relationship between the exotic physical phenomena and the intrinsic bulk band topology in Weyl semimetals, but also resolve the apparent puzzle of the different magneto-transport properties observed in TaAs, TaP and NbP, where the Fermi arc states are similar.
  • We discover a pair of spin-polarized surface bands on the (111) face of grey arsenic by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In the occupied side, the pair resembles typical nearly-free-electron Shockley states observed on noble-metal surfaces. However, pump-probe ARPES reveals that the spin-polarized pair traverses the bulk band gap and that the crossing of the pair at $\bar\Gamma$ is topologically unavoidable. First-principles calculations well reproduce the bands and their non-trivial topology; the calculations also support that the surface states are of Shockley type because they arise from a band inversion caused by crystal field. The results provide compelling evidence that topological Shockley states are realized on As(111).
  • Using polarization-resolved electronic Raman scattering we study under-doped, optimally-doped and over-doped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ samples in the normal and superconducting states. We show that low-energy nematic fluctuations are universal for all studied doping range. In the superconducting state, we observe two distinct superconducting pair breaking peaks corresponding to one large and one small superconducting gaps. In addition, we detect a collective mode below the superconducting transition in the B$_{2g}$ channel and determine the evolution of its binding energy with doping. Possible scenarios are proposed to explain the origin of the in-gap collective mode. In the superconducting state of the under-doped regime, we detect a re-entrance transition below which the spectral background changes and the collective mode vanishes.
  • The unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in $^3$He($e,e^{\prime}\pi^{\pm}$)$X$ have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 performed with a $5.9\,$GeV $e^-$ beam on a $^3$He target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range $0.12 < x_{bj} < 0.45$, $1 < Q^2 < 4 \, \textrm{(GeV/c)}^2$, $0.45 < z_{h} < 0.65$, and $0.05 < P_t < 0.55 \, \textrm{GeV/c}$. The extracted SIDIS differential cross sections of $\pi^{\pm}$ production are compared with existing phenomenological models while the $^3$He nucleus approximated as two protons and one neutron in a plane wave picture, in multi-dimensional bins. Within the experimental uncertainties, the azimuthal modulations of the cross sections are found to be consistent with zero.
  • We performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of BaMn$_2$As$_2$ and BaMn$_2$Sb$_2$, which are isostructural to the parent compound BaFe$_2$As$_2$ of the 122 family of ferropnictide superconductors. We show the existence of a strongly $k_z$-dependent band gap with a minimum at the Brillouin zone center, in agreement with their semiconducting properties. Despite the half-filling of the electronic 3$d$ shell, we show that the band structure in these materials is almost not renormalized from the Kohn-Sham bands of density functional theory. Our photon energy dependent study provides evidence for Mn-pnictide hybridization, which may play a role in tuning the electronic correlations in these compounds.
  • Condensed matter systems can host quasiparticle excitations that are analogues to elementary particles such as Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac fermions. Recent advances in band theory have expanded the classification of fermions in crystals, and revealed crystal symmetry-protected electron excitations that have no high-energy counterparts. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate the existence of a triply degenerate point in the electronic structure of MoP crystal, where the quasiparticle excitations are beyond the Majorana-Weyl-Dirac classification. Furthermore, we observe pairs of Weyl points in the bulk electronic structure coexisting with the 'new fermions', thus introducing a platform for studying the interplay between different types of fermions.
  • We report single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on Na$_2$Ti$_{2}Pn_{2}$O ($Pn$ = As, Sb) which reveal a charge superstructure that appears below the density wave transitions previously observed in bulk data. From symmetry-constrained structure refinements we establish that the associated distortion mode can be described by two propagation vectors, ${\bf q}_{1} = (1/2, 0, l)$ and ${\bf q}_{2} = (0, 1/2, l)$, with $l=0$ (Sb) or $l = 1/2$ (As), and primarily involves in-plane displacements of the Ti atoms perpendicular to the Ti--O bonds. The results provide direct evidence for phonon-assisted charge density wave order in Na$_2$Ti$_{2}Pn_{2}$O and identify a proximate ordered phase that could compete with superconductivity in doped BaTi$_{2}$Sb$_{2}$O.
  • MoTe$_2$ is an exfoliable transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) which crystallizes in three symmetries, the semiconducting trigonal-prismatic $2H-$phase, the semimetallic $1T^{\prime}$ monoclinic phase, and the semimetallic orthorhombic $T_d$ structure. The $2H-$phase displays a band gap of $\sim 1$ eV making it appealing for flexible and transparent optoelectronics. The $T_d-$phase is predicted to possess unique topological properties which might lead to topologically protected non-dissipative transport channels. Recently, it was argued that it is possible to locally induce phase-transformations in TMDs, through chemical doping, local heating, or electric-field to achieve ohmic contacts or to induce useful functionalities such as electronic phase-change memory elements. The combination of semiconducting and topological elements based upon the same compound, might produce a new generation of high performance, low dissipation optoelectronic elements. Here, we show that it is possible to engineer the phases of MoTe$_2$ through W substitution by unveiling the phase-diagram of the Mo$_{1-x}$W$_x$Te$_2$ solid solution which displays a semiconducting to semimetallic transition as a function of $x$. We find that only $\sim 8$ \% of W stabilizes the $T_d-$phase at room temperature. Photoemission spectroscopy, indicates that this phase possesses a Fermi surface akin to that of WTe$_2$.
  • We synthesized a series of V-doped LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As single crystals. The superconducting transition temperature $T_c$ of LiFeAs decreases rapidly at a rate of 7 K per 1\% V. The Hall coefficient of LiFeAs switches from negative to positive with 4.2\% V doping, showing that V doping introduces hole carriers. This observation is further confirmed by the evaluation of the Fermi surface volume measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), from which a 0.3 hole doping per V atom introduced is deduced. Interestingly, the introduction of holes does not follow a rigid band shift. We also show that the temperature evolution of the electrical resistivity as a function of doping is consistent with a crossover from a Fermi liquid to a non-Fermi liquid. Our ARPES data indicate that the non-Fermi liquid behavior is mostly enhanced when one of the hole $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ Fermi surfaces is well nested by the antiferromagnetic wave vector to the inner electron Fermi surface pocket with the $d_{xy}$ orbital character. The magnetic susceptibility of LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As suggests the presence of strong magnetic impurities following V doping, thus providing a natural explanation to the rapid suppression of superconductivity upon V doping.
  • By combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum oscillation measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on the electronic structure of LaSb, which exhibits near-quadratic extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) without any sign of saturation at magnetic fields as high as 40 T. We clearly resolve one spherical and one intersecting-ellipsoidal hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center $\Gamma$ and one ellipsoidal electron FS at the BZ boundary $X$. The hole and electron carriers calculated from the enclosed FS volumes are perfectly compensated, and the carrier compensation is unaffected by temperature. We further reveal that LaSb is topologically trivial but share many similarities with the Weyl semimetal TaAs family in the bulk electronic structure. Based on these results, we have examined the mechanisms that have been proposed so far to explain the near-quadratic XMR in semimetals.
  • By using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we reveal that the topmost unit cell of ZrSnTe crystal hosts two-dimensional (2D) electronic bands of topological insulator (TI) state, though such a TI state is defined with a curved Fermi level instead of a global band gap. Furthermore, we find that by modifying the dangling bonds on the surface through hydrogenation, this 2D band structure can be manipulated so that the expected global energy gap is most likely to be realized. This facilitates the practical applications of 2D TI in heterostructural devices and those with surface decoration and coverage. Since ZrSnTe belongs to a large family of compounds having the similar crystal and band structures, our findings shed light on identifying more 2D TI candidates and superconductor-TI heterojunctions supporting topological superconductors.