• Novel high efficiency fast-neutron detectors were suggested for fan-beam tomography applications. They combine multi-layer polymer converters in gas medium, coupled to thick gaseous electron multipliers (THGEM). In this work we discuss the results of a systematic study of the electron transport inside a narrow gap between successive converter foils, which affects the performance of the detector, both in terms of detection efficiency and localization properties. The efficiency of transporting ionization electrons was measured along a 0.6 mm wide gas gap in 6 and 10 mm wide polymer converters Computer simulations provided conceptual understanding of the observations. For a drift lengths of 6 mm electrons were efficiently transported along the narrow gas gap, with minimal diffusion-induced losses; an average collection efficiency of 95% was achieved for the ionization electrons induced by a primary electron of a few keV initial energy. The 10 mm height converter yielded considerably lower efficiency due to electrical and mechanical flaws of the converter foils. The results indicate that detection efficiencies of around 7% can be expected for 2.5 MeV neutrons with 300 foils converters, of 6 mm height, 0.4 mm thick foils and 0.6 mm gas gap.
  • Super B factories that will further probe the flavor sector of the Standard Model and physics beyond will demand excellent charged particle identification (PID), particularly K/pi separation, for momenta up to 4 GeV/c, as well as the ability to operate under beam backgrounds significantly higher than current B factory experiments. We describe an Imaging Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector which shows significant potential to meet these requirements. Photons emitted from charged particle interactions in a Cerenkov radiator bar are internally reflected to the end of the bar, where they are collected on a compact image plane using photodetectors with fine spatial segmentation in two dimensions. Precision measurements of photon arrival time are used to enhance the two dimensional imaging, allowing the system to provide excellent PID capabilities within a reduced detector envelope. Results of the ongoing optimization of the geometric and physical properties of such a detector are presented, as well as simulated PID performance. Validation of simulations is being performed using a prototype in a cosmic ray test stand at the University of Hawaii.
  • Recently, the last two modules (out of seven) of the ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification detector (HMPID) were assembled and tested. The full detector, after a pre-commissioning phase, has been installed in the experimental area, inside the ALICE solenoid, at the end of September 2006. In this paper we review the status of the ALICE/HMPID project and we present a summary of the series production of the CsI photo-cathodes. We describe the key features of the production procedure which ensures high quality photo-cathodes as well as the results of the quality assessment performed by means of a specially developed 2D scanner system able to produce a detailed map of the CsI photo-current over the entire photo-cathode surface. Finally we present our recent R&D efforts toward the development of a novel generation of imaging Cherenkov detectors with the aim to identify, in heavy ions collisions, hadrons up to 30 GeV/c.